2
votes
5answers
107 views

Is 'lightning' here a noun or an adjective or even an adverb?

Oxford Dictionaries has this example under ADJECTIVE 'lightning': (1) Roman is lightning quick and improving every day in practice, and Bean showed playmaking ability in the preseason. The ...
3
votes
4answers
82 views

Could “shingled” mean “pebbly”?

One of the definition of shingle is a mass of small rounded pebbles, especially on a seashore. You can say a shingle beach (more common usage in UK than US perhaps) Is it also correct ...
0
votes
2answers
138 views

How do you convert a noun into an adjective? [closed]

What would be the adjectives for nouns like shopkeeper, country, wife, earring, teacher, father — and so on and so forth?
3
votes
5answers
299 views

What is a noun or adjective to describe somebody who juggles work, study, hobbies, family and more?

I'm trying to describe someone who burns the candle at both ends. They work full-time, they study full-time, they have creative projects on the go, they raise their family and manage their property - ...
3
votes
2answers
99 views

Word to Warn of Danger of Usage

I need a term or word to refer to something which is very powerful but if used naïvely will cause great harm. I could say: "This is a [noun], use with care." or: "Use this with care it is ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

“Not only one of the most talented actors of our age but kind.” — what does 'kind' mean here?

I was searching for information about the original novel "House of Cards" and from following site, in the middile of the page, there's sentence which compliment Kevin Spicey as shown ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
1
vote
3answers
66 views

a word for an unfamiliar situation

Is there a single word for an unfamiliar situation or a better way of wording this? If a situation is unfamiliar to you.
0
votes
3answers
73 views

Single word for person entitled to receive a sales commission

I need a fairly specific single word for a person who is entitled to receive a sales commission. "Agent" for example isn't specific enough. A short phrase is also usable. Adjectives ditto. The ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

As a noun, “abandon” is almost always preceded by the word “reckless”. [duplicate]

Feel free to correct me if you don't share the same experience, but in my own experience, usage of the word "abandon" as a noun without being apart of the phrase "reckless abandon" is extremely rare. ...
7
votes
9answers
2k views

Is there a word for “people who are computer illiterate”?

Just as there is "computerate" to describe those who show familiarity with, and ability to use computers, is there a word to describe the opposite, those who are computer illiterate? The word I'm ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Using adjectives as nouns

What is the term for using an adjective in the place of a noun? It seems to come up a lot in fantasy fiction, generally used as a proper noun to describe a group ("the Twisted", "the Hunted"), but it ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
4
votes
0answers
106 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

Part of speech of “that”?

In this sentence: Its shape resembles that of a kangaroo’s hind foot. What part of speech would that be?
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Non-aerodynamic meanings of 'vane'

I tried to look for other meanings of 'vane' not related to aerodynamics (weather vane, vane of a feather, etc), and I wasn't really successful. Oxforddictionaries.com gives an example of adjective as ...
7
votes
7answers
1k views

Is there any word available for an incident occurred and vanished in front of eyes?

I was confused, when one of my friends was writing his name on a lead from vapor of mouth: I saw his name for a few seconds and after that it automatically disappeared. So what can I call this ...
14
votes
3answers
813 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Cartesian”?

While working on an essay for my English class I included this sentence: The best solution is to take a page out of Cartesian theory and take a proven approach. However, my teacher corrected it ...
2
votes
2answers
307 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
1
vote
2answers
190 views

How to describe humanities students in one word

In several languages, there is a specific, usually rather derogatory word for students of the humanities. Would it be necessary to stick to 'arts students' or 'humanities students' to point out these ...
4
votes
8answers
2k views

Negative counterpart for the word “rave” in the sense “favorable criticism”

What is the one-word for a piece — art piece etc., maybe topic, subject — that has gained popularity through negative reviews or appraisals? In other words, I am looking for a one-word noun or ...
2
votes
4answers
392 views

Is there a word for exceptional writing?

Is there a word to describe the gift of exceptional writing? Or, what would you call someone whose writing is well above average?
3
votes
7answers
687 views

What's the word to describe work that is a waste of effort?

I am looking for a word to describe projects, work that is insignificant? I can't remember that. It has to be just a word that describes "work that is a waste of effort".
-1
votes
2answers
49 views

Punctuation help

I need help with the correct punctuation for the following: Every empty box symbolizes a child's wish unanswered, and a dream unfulfilled. I think the construction of the sentence is more ...
0
votes
1answer
126 views

What do you call a second try at a test?

At uni you can do the final test of a course twice, what do you call the second test ? Is it a second term ? No that's the second semester isn't it ?
1
vote
2answers
85 views

In the word “quantum mechanics”, is quantum a noun or an adjective?

In the phrases containing the word quantum, like quantum mechanics, quantum information, quantum computation, quantum field theory,etc. is quantum a noun or an adjective? I mean, is it really ...
6
votes
2answers
381 views

using noun as adjective; does position matter?

I'm doing some programming and I'm analyzing text written in English. I'm identifying parts of speech and I run into cases where I have something like vacuum cleaner. I, as a human, know that the word ...
0
votes
2answers
254 views

“Sexy” and “sexiness”

When did the noun sex acquire its corresponding adjective and abstract noun? I would really like to know a few things about the history of these two word formations. As far as I know, these lexical ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

Are there any rules I can follow to make my own derived adjectives from a noun in English? E.g. xenogamy to xenogamic

I'm currently looking through dictionaries (both online and "offline") for an adjective of the word xenogamy. Basically I want to translate the Dutch phrase "De kruibestuivende onderneming". What I ...
0
votes
1answer
159 views

An adjective or a noun?

In the collocation "baby girl" is "baby" an adjective or a noun?
2
votes
1answer
868 views

Compound noun or adjective + noun?

Substitute teacher is an adjective and a noun, where substitute is an adjective as defined in the dictionary. However, what about replacement teacher? Replacement is defined as a noun in the ...
0
votes
2answers
143 views

What is the correct usage of the word “milquetoast”? [duplicate]

The google definition of this word states that it is a noun however in its own example of usage it is used as an adjective: "a frail, milquetoast character". I haven't found any reliable sources to ...
2
votes
2answers
228 views

determiner “the” followed by adjective - parts of speech

In English, adjectives usually cannot function as noun or pronouns, at least not to the degree it is possible in German where you can do it without thinking. The old car sucked. The new is better. ...
-1
votes
2answers
98 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
0
votes
1answer
144 views

Referring to a person, should I use the capital letter for “Fascist”?

As I understand, the word Fascism must be capitalised, while the adjective fascist should not. But what if "Fascist" is used as a noun? Eg: "The headmaster was enlisted in the National Fascist Party ...
1
vote
2answers
127 views

Is it grammatically incorrect to say that someone desires ambiguous brevity?

Brevity is a noun, is it not? So, ambiguous, being an adjective, should be able to modify it, correct? That was the first thought I had regarding the subject, but for some reason it just doesn't sound ...
2
votes
1answer
497 views

Can “some” be a noun and a subject?

What is the noun in this sentence: Some of our greatest innovations were launched during tough times. I know that of our greatest innovations is a prepositional phrase and as such cannot contain ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

“Two separate nouns + based” as the attribute?

In scientific writing, it is correct to write something like The filter-based method is good. But what if I have two nouns before -based? Something like The lowpass filter-based method is ...
1
vote
3answers
314 views

To talk angrily and provoked in a low voice

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person continuously talking angrily as if fighting with someone, for example over a phone, but in a low and whispering manner.
0
votes
4answers
137 views

Growing abruptly and aggressively - words

How to describe a sudden increasing in size, volume. For example when fires grow suddenly and rapidly. What does that fire do?
5
votes
4answers
191 views

Word for “getting careless and slacking”

Can you suggest some words which can describe a person who is starting to get careless and who slacks, or the very action of becoming careless? A person who was efficiently and elaborately doing their ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Word for a person who lives in the past

Someone who is highly nostalgic and is stuck in the past, better days
-1
votes
3answers
190 views

The state of not progressing [closed]

What is the state of not progressing called? Going in circles. When the person is not progressing despite the active trying.
1
vote
2answers
875 views

Words that describe the repetitive sound of machine [closed]

I'm looking for words that can describe the repetitive sounds that machine produces (For example an engine). Those droning, looped and long-lasting sounds. Patterned sounds of various parts of an ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
1
vote
2answers
171 views

“Prodigal” vs. “spendthrift”

What are the differences between the words prodigal and spendthrift? They seem to mean the same. When does one choose to use one over the other?
-2
votes
1answer
163 views

explain the structure of “Ears Polite”? [closed]

"Ears Polite". How do you justify this construction?
5
votes
4answers
879 views

What is the noun form of “erratic”?

Erratic doesn't have a meaning related to error. It means eccentric, or unsteady instead. Error has its adjective form as erroneous and errant. So what is the noun of erratic?
4
votes
9answers
427 views

What can you call someone who does not have a say in choices that completely affect him? [closed]

Something to call someone who doesn't have a say in the choices that affect him the most? Think 'a major stakeholder who has no voting rights,' ha!