Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Hypernym for “audio podcast”, “radio drama”, and “audiobook”

I'm setting up my media library to contain music, movies, shows, audio podcasts, radio dramas, and audiobooks. I would like audio podcasts, radio dramas, and audiobooks to be in the same category, ...
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7answers
1k views

Me and my ancestors - single word

I'd like to find a single noun that relates to me and which corresponds to the list of people including me and each of my ancestors. I've already rejected the following words: genealogy : means a ...
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21 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
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16 views

“His dishonesty” vs “His being dishonest”

My question is - which of the two phrases above sound better/worse? His dishonesty OR His being dishonest Actually, the question is not only about this particular noun/adjective pair, but ...
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26 views

Do noun clauses need subjects?

"Homework is what I hate to do." "Homework is what makes me sad." In the first sentence, "what I hate the most" is clearly a noun clause. It functions as a subject complement. And it begins with a ...
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104 views

Simplicity is elegance? or elegant?

As the title asks, which is grammatically correct? Simplicity is elegance? Or simplicity is elegant? If both are correct,in which cases they are correct?
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Binding of adjectives to two consequtive nouns

Lets say I have a phrase a valid geometry pointer (which might be a little technical but the focus is on adjectives and nouns). How does the word valid bind to geometry pointer? Does it mean a (valid ...
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1answer
56 views

Is it common to refer to the person steering a ship as 'pilot'? [on hold]

According to its M-W entry (supported by some other dictionaries), a pilot (used of a person) can mean, among other things: a : one employed to steer a ship : helmsman b : a person who is ...
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Common term or single word for someone who is embarrassingly over-complimentary

Does English have a word for someone who compliments another person in a way which is awkward or even embarrassing? Someone who uses compliments which are overly-familiar and all but inappropriate, ...
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189 views

Why is the plural of “aircraft” not “aircrafts”?

I came along this sentence: Today, we have used a large number of assets, comprising of 34 aircraft, 40 ships, hundreds of men, thousands of man-hours has been deployed I consulted dictionaries ...
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256 views

What do you call the period between having sex?

If a couple are having a romantic or sexy get away where they're staying in bed and having sex and otherwise hanging out - is there a term use for the periods where they're not actually in the act of ...
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A synonym for the prefix intro~

Good afternoon, While working on a philosophical paper I came across a slight problem and while I searched for an answer on my own, I seem predisposed to not find any, at least not in the sense of an ...
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Can the word “imperative” be a noun? [closed]

Here's an example: It is our imperative to bomb the volcano early, thus preventing a much larger eruption later. Is "imperative" correct there? It seems to be synonymous with "duty", or maybe ...
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Is “reservee” an acceptable word like employee?

I see one reference from an old version of Webster but not much else. Word says it is misspelled. Which is it? Our list of reservees include Beyonce, Cher, Bono...
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32 views

When did 'street', 'road', etc. start being capitalised?

Old newspapers and books seem to very rarely capitalise (and often hyphenate) phrases like "High street", "Herbert-road", and "Trusting lane". These days, we capitalise "Street", "Road", and "Lane". ...
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4answers
68 views

What do you call someone who has a disease or mental condition?

I'm looking for a noun to suffix to a condition to refer to the person who has that condition. Existing words are like: Cancer patients are subject to chemotherapy which causes them to lose ...
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57 views

which is wrong? 1. “What is your suggest?” 2. “What is your suggestion?” [closed]

which is wrong? 1. "What is your suggest?" 2. "What is your suggestion?"
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501 views

What is the word for stories/movies/poems that have a moral lesson [closed]

I am reading this book - and I have been trying to remember the word but it's eluding me. What is the word for stories/movies/poems that provide a moral lesson.
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6answers
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Verb or noun for - when I am not short of words but unable to speak lucidly

A situation when I am not short of words but confused by the setting. the situation does not let me speak properly/lucidly. I kind of trip over my words. I don't know what to do. The silence was ...
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What do you call it when it's not raining, but the atmosphere causes everything to be wet?

I'm currently having a discussion with colleagues about what this is. Basically it's kind of a cloud has rolled into to ground level. It's not raining in the sense that there are no drops of water ...
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3answers
146 views

How can you tell which noun a clause modifies?

I'm a ESOL teacher, and I'm having trouble answering a question that a student asked me recently. We were going over long sentences, and found this one from the New York Times: Saudi Arabia said ...
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2answers
91 views

What do you call a person doing a task that a computer can do better?

Is there a term for a person performing a task that a computer could perform faster/better, but the reason the person is doing it is because of a failure in a company to improve processes/systems?
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34 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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Line Art: A word like Scrimshaw or Filligree?

I'm looking for a word that refers to a fine, decorative line-work illustration that is used for accenting signage or letterhead. It's similar in usage to scrimshaw (except not a picture) or filigree ...
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2answers
65 views

What's the name of this boat?

Is there a more appropriate name for a boat like the one below? Other than fishing boat, wood boat, rowboat, canoe. Thank you
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When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
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A person who is trying to impress somebody

What do we call a person who is trying to impress somebody (not necessarily to gain any advantage). For example, he buys them expensive products, always talking in a sweet manner etc. To describe an ...
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47 views

Should corporations be referred to in the singular or plural? [duplicate]

I keep coming across articles, especially technology related ones, where corporations are referred to in the plural. Example, "Oracle have decided to make G1 the standard ..." or "Google have become ...
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52 views

Where a name related to a noun should be placed?

Say I have three kinds of items that I call A, B, and C. Now, I want to ask someone to create one. Which form is the correct one? Create an item A. or Create an A item. ?
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what article should go before specific games?

I came across an article in the below link about general and specific nouns General and specific Nouns My question is which article (grammar article) should go before these general, more specific, ...
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402 views

Is there a word for a person who is not rich, but nevertheless acts as if he's wealthy in front of strangers?

My neighbor is just like that person, so, I think to write a poem on him and desire to break his self-forgetfulness by narrating his pride to him!
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59 views

Why do we have “anxiousness”, but not “frightenness”?

Why do we have the word "anxiousness", but not the word "frighteness"? Both would mean something similar: "Being anxious" respectively Being frightened" ps: To make it even more analogous, I could ...
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223 views

Indefinite articles used with plural nouns: It was AN amazing TWO DAYS

The indefinite article a(n), derives from the old English word an meaning "one". Generally this word only occurs in determiner function before noun phrases which are singular. However, there seem to ...
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OK to use “capstone” as an adjective?

The term "capstone project" is common. Google tells me there's also something called "Capstone Classroom." The dictionary -- whatever dictionary you might look in -- says "capstone" is only ever a ...
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Term for someone who feel the need to learn

Is there any specific term for someone who feel the need of constantly learning something new ? like a learning disease. What should the appropriate term be?
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What do you call psychological diseases that affect many people at once (or many people of a society)?

I am talking about diseases such as the Jerusalem syndrome, the Paris syndrome, and the Dancing Plague of 1518. Is there a general name for such diseases?
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51 views

Any rule for using nationality as a noun? [duplicate]

As you know there are times when using a nationality (without any modification) is a correct way to refer to a person of that nationality and there are times when it is incorrect. For example "He is a ...
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What do you call the headings along the top of a newspaper that reference later page articles?

Often newspapers have a header on the front page where they feature headlines, as well as the page number, for feature articles in later pages of the newspaper. What do you call these?
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Incisive: Noun use

Incisiveness is the noun of the incisive adjective, but in this sentence: Communication has to be incisive. It seems to me that Incisiveness doesn't work here, and incisive sounds correct, ...
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83 views

coffee vs. some coffee

I want coffee. vs. I want some coffee. Does these two sentences completely identical? In general, is it possible to delete the word "some" from every instance of "some coffee", and to keep ...
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What is a noun that means “the skill of being able to use technology efficiently?”

What is a noun that means "the skill of being able to use technology efficiently or easily?" Thanks
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Is this a noun clause or an adverbial?

I'm interested in the following question: I want to visit where my grandmother was born. To me it seems like a noun clause because I could replace the clause with a noun. For example: I want to ...
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1answer
69 views

It hurts my “feeling” vs “feelings” [closed]

One can see both variants used. Are both correct? And what the difference, if so? I suppose, when word "feeling" is used in this this context, the phrase must be extended with the mention of ...
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94 views

Fire meet gasoline: is it correct?

Is it grammatically correct to say "Fire meet gasoline", as in the Sia's song, or just poetic license?? "Flame and candle meet, fire meet gasoline Fire meet gasoline, I'm burnin' alive ...
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48 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
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142 views

Single word to define a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement

I am looking for a word that defines a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement. Just like the term "perfectionist" that defines a person who always looks for perfection. Is ...
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0answers
27 views

Use of collective nouns and verbs

I see the British normally use plural form of the verbs associated with collective nouns. An example, "The team have fired its coach" versus "The team has fired its coach". I have been told this is ...
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Opposite of a requiem [closed]

The definition of a requiem is a song which plays on one's funeral. I was wondering, is there a word which means the opposite - a song which is used as a celebration of one's birth? Thank you!
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Does orchestra need “the” before it?

Does the sentence It requires full orchestra and progressively adds each of the four brass bands need the between "requires" and "full"?
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Word for someone who can't keep up with the times?

Is there a word that means roughly 'someone who refuses to accept change and insists that things should be done in the old established way'? I'm looking for something like behind the times or has ...