Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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I have good vision/sight/eyesight

In my language, Russian, there is only one variant to express the "abilty to see" in its common physiological sence. If I have a good ability (I am born with) I say: У меня хорошее зрение So ...
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1answer
39 views

Using “Hello, boys/girls/men/women”

It appears to me that we say Hello, boys/girls to a group of boys/girls, but do not say Hello, men/women to a group of men/women. Is this the case in your particular variety of English? ...
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1answer
33 views

What is the plural of the abbreviation of “multiplicity automaton”, “MA” or “MAs”?

The "multiplicity automaton (MA)" is a model in compute science and its plural is "multiplicity automata". Should the plural of the abbreviation be MA or MAs? What is the correct way to pluralize ...
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1answer
16 views

“The” before adjectives

I'm a bit confused about this. Which example is the right one? From all the fellow writers, who was the best? From all fellow writers, who was the best? Is there a reason why "the" should be used ...
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17 views

When do you link composite words with dashes? (compounds)

In German (my mother tongue) it is very common to combine several nouns into a new word by linking them together with dashes. After a word has been established in German, you even see it getting ...
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3answers
48 views

Is there a general or collective term for a gathering that involves eating?

For example lunch, dinner, birthday part or food at a wake as opposed to a gathering not may or may not serve food and drink.
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2answers
75 views

What do you call a student who studies extra at home to become proficient?

What is the British English term for someone (a student) who goes home after classes and practices the lesson learned that day, or becomes proficient in the lesson taught? It is not a positive ...
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2answers
37 views

Somebody who comes up with an idea, but needs somebody else to create something from that idea

Here's the situation: Ideas come in two parts: seed and finalized. Some people can create many seed ideas but can't finish them. Some people can't create seed ideas, but can source seeds from ...
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1answer
19 views

Trampoline and stuff belonging to it

Can the word trampoline be used as a possessive noun? Kind of like, the trampoline's elasticity ? Or, ...belonged to the trampoline's frame... ? Got the doubt because my auto-correct ...
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1answer
20 views

“Reflect” as a noun

The song For Marlon by Soko has the lyrics And it's been raining for 3 days straight As a sad reflect of my sorry state Can you use reflect as a noun (instead of reflection) or is Soko ...
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1answer
54 views

What is more appropriate: “weekly meet” or “weekly meeting”? [closed]

We as a group meet once a week, for which we want to create an invite. For that meeting invite, we are confused whether it should be called: "weekly meeting" or "weekly meet".
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2answers
40 views

use of capital C in the word 'Century'

I know if you are referring to 'centuries' in general, you don't use a capital letter. I know that if you are talking about a particular century, like 'the 20th Century', it's a capital letter. If ...
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44 views

What is a word for loving sadness?

I need a word for a love of sadness. A quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, for the feel. "Melancholy," I repeated. I liked the way it sounded, like there was music hidden somewhere inside it. (Kate ...
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3answers
381 views

What's the boundary wall on/of a roof called?

I walked over to the boundary wall of the roof, determined to see over the edge. What word can I use instead of the phrase in bold? EDIT: When roofs DO have boundary walls, usually a few feet high, ...
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1answer
31 views

“Science committee” vs “Scientific committee”

Is Science Committee correct and/or more accurate than Scientific Committee? I'm in a committee at a science lab where we organize events to promote the research done in-house. The committee is a ...
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1answer
34 views

“You are set up” or “you are setup” [closed]

“you are set up” or “you are setup” Which of these forms is correct in the sense of “you (or your account) is ready” ?
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3answers
41 views

A noun to describe an intention not to use humor when not necessary [closed]

I am seeking a noun that would describe a person's attempt to refrain themselves from being "cool" in responding (perhaps to an email message), often contrary to their humorous nature - an intentional ...
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1answer
22 views

Same theme pictures( or paintings) merged

Is there an english word (substantive) that refers to a type of picture or painting where there are merged lot of pieces of a same theme? So far I found 'mural' and 'collage', but not sure if they ...
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3answers
721 views

Ambiguous meaning - two nouns in a row

I'm often confused by the meaning of two nouns in a row. Specifically, I came across this word in a TV show: Demon Hunter Without looking at the context of the show, I feel like this word can ...
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2answers
72 views

Capitalization of some common nouns in English texts

I’m a French web developer who translated a web site in English by a non-native but experienced English speaker (has lived in the US and UK for 15 years, worked in English for 20 years). I just ...
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2answers
36 views

Best word to describe assesing value of a project

I am a web developer, I often work with clients who like to know how much my work will cost them. The problem is - I am not a native English speaker and I need to tell them that I evaluated the price ...
2
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3answers
86 views

Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?

I ngram-viewered 'a fifty-pence piece' and 'a fifty-pence coin' and found 'piece' to be more common than 'coin'. But for 'a one-pound piece' and 'a one-pound coin', it is the opposite. Any idea ...
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1answer
73 views

Noun form for “despise”

What would the noun form for despise be? My current two ideas are despite and derision. According to Google, the etymology of despite is Middle English (originally used as a noun meaning ...
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2answers
141 views

Why do people write “women characters” but not “children actors”?

In certain feminist circles, including major publications, it is politically correct to write "women characters" instead of "female characters". But why is the word "women" pluralized? Why is it ...
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1answer
30 views

What does the word 'candle-skin' mean?

In the book Cider with Rosie, an autobiographical coming-of-age novel written by British author Laurie Lee and published in 1959, I find the word 'candle-skin', which I tried to look up in many online ...
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What is a non derogatory word for the opposite of a Manager? [duplicate]

If the person above me in an organisation, that I report to, is my manager. What would be a term my manager would refer to me, and my peers under them? Minion, lackey, or lieutenant kinda work; but ...
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6answers
617 views

An employee called me “boss”, but I don't like it. How can I colloquially say that? [closed]

I'm a Coordinator at an English course in a small city in Brazil, and one of the teachers called me "boss" today. However, I don't appreciate being called that, therefore I'd like to tell him not to ...
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10answers
1k views

Looking for a word to describe ineffectual people who would like to be effective

I need to create names for four categories of people - people who score either high or low on measures of environmental concern and pro-environmental behaviour. I have three sorted so far: High ...
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0answers
18 views

Is it “Click option Yes; Click button Proceed or ”Click the option Yes; Click the button Proceed"

It's clear that we need an article in cases like these: Click the X option, Click the Y button. But do you write an article in cases where the proper noun follows the regular noun: Click **the** ...
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1answer
44 views

it's not always possible to describe beauty [closed]

Does this sentence only contain Abstract nouns? I'm hoping for a yes. "it's not always possible to describe beauty" it is for an online quiz so I am hoping to get an idea
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1answer
38 views

What is the person who records the sales/winning bids in an Auction called?

In an auction there is a person doing the auction chant (auctioneer) and another person recording the results : who won and for how much. What is that second person called?
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2answers
30 views

Communism/communism and Communist/communist [duplicate]

I have some doubts regarding capitalizing or not the following words: Communism Communist I know that Communism is generally written with capital letter, but sometimes I have this doubt and cannot ...
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2answers
19 views

Singular or Plural Version of a Common Noun of Two Compound Nouns Combined Using “And”?

"Enter your first and last names to get started." or "Enter your first and last name to get started."
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41 views

Gerund vs noun— which to use in title

This issue of gerunds vs noun always puzzled me and in this particular case made me wonder. I actually am translating my thesis title into English and am not sure as to use gerund or noun. So which ...
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10answers
3k views

What is an online “shop” that provides only software available for free?

I have a platform for user created content and applications that can be downloaded from within a launcher for free. I am looking for a term that tells users where they can browse extensions, ...
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1answer
41 views

A word for how much of a sales target has been acomplished

Imagine the user interface of a sales commission management system. You have clearly labeled Goal showing the amount in sales the sales representative has to sell in order to reach it. Then there is ...
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3answers
1k views

English equivalent of 'kuma.'

The kuma is the kid that lingers around you when you're eating ice cream. He/She wants the ice cream for himself/herself. Could be a brother, sister or a complete stranger. Sometimes would make a fuss ...
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1answer
26 views

Name of a specific room in radiology department in hospital where doctors write images' descriptions

What is the proper name (if there is any) of the room where doctors write descriptions of various radiology images. This room typically has a bit different light, some special grey-scale-only-monitors ...
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1answer
41 views

Can “collection” pertain to a single object? [closed]

Can "collection" pertain to a single object? For example, is a library with a single volume a "library"? Suppose the curator aims at acquiring more works of the same type as the one it possesses - ...
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1answer
59 views

What is the noun form of the verb “vocalize”? [closed]

I know, vocalize means "to give voice to". I would like to know the noun form of it. thank you :)
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2answers
68 views

Is there a word for salivating in response to negative stimuli, as opposed to positive stimuli?

Like when you smell a dead rat your mouth produces saliva and makes you spit a lot. Or when you see something gross, doesn't make you vomit, but your mouth waters you spit a lot.
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1answer
54 views

word for a condescending, snarky, yet awkward and jealous, person

i'm looking for a word for a person who is cynical, judgmental, nitpicking, condescending but also flawed, gawky and timid (in an unfamiliar setting), and is harboring some kind of jealousy towards ...
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3answers
43 views

Is there a word like “stato” or 'stathole"?

Recently I've heard it on BBC's Documentary podcast (What Should we Teach Our Kids?, 1:14 min into the programme). It's described as British slang. Apparently it refers to a person who is an expert ...
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1answer
56 views

What do you call it when a spectator distracts a player. [closed]

Like when a member of the audience yells at a player so he misses his shot.
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17 views

Stating the obvious [duplicate]

Stating the obvious has been discussed here before but in the context of a derogatory response to someone who does same. E.g. duh, dur, nss etc. What I would particularly like to know "is there a ...
4
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2answers
123 views

Are pronouns nouns?

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum 2002) and many other grammars, the English pronouns are viewed as a subcategory of the English nouns. In other grammars, such ...
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42 views

“software” vs “a software”? [duplicate]

This is IMO not a duplicate of the other "software" vs. "a software" question (Why don't we use the indefinite article with software) because that question doesn't have stuff (in this case "wonderful ...
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2answers
73 views

Word for someone who feels as if they must atone for something?

It is not that the person has done something that is necessarily wrong; it is more as if a situation occurred and the person feels they may have caused it, or the person feels guilty about it in ...
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1answer
70 views

Chatroom or chat room? [closed]

According to Wikipedia: The term chat room, or chatroom, is primarily used to describe any form of synchronous conferencing, occasionally even asynchronous conferencing. Merriam-Webster lists ...
3
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3answers
134 views

A word meaning to dig land with your nails or fingers

What do you call "to dig land" with fingers? If I say “He desperately dug the soil” it sounds like the person is using a tool such as a shovel or a spade. Which verb means digging with only your ...