Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

-1
votes
0answers
23 views

General rule for name and category, eg. “Variable x” or “x variable”? [on hold]

What's the general rule for name and category? Consider the following examples. If they have a special rule, note it. A variable called "x". --> Variable x equals 5, or Variable "x" equals 5, ...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

“Shipping cost” or “shipping price”?

While building an ecommerce website, I'm writing the labels for the checkout process. I'd like to use the words “price” and “cost” correctly (I understand that a product on the shelf has a price, but ...
2
votes
2answers
97 views

What do you call a person who counts the favor he has done for you?

Sometimes he/she rubs it in your face. What do you call the instance of this action? What do you call this action?
1
vote
2answers
71 views

What do you call a sibling who keeps calling 'mom?'

That younger sibling who shouts 'mom' when you tease them. You hit or about to him/her and he/she yells 'mom' or 'dad.'
1
vote
5answers
146 views

What is a hypernym for the ascending and descending legs of a flight?

If an airline flight is everything that happens in between your starting and ending gates. What is the generic term for each time the plane ascends or descends during an air route? In layman terms, ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

I really need the meaning [on hold]

What is the simplest and perfect word for someone that wants the progress of his school?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Omitting the possessive case correctly

I forgot how exactly the rule in English is called where you can omit the usual possessive case 's and s' if we're speaking about a row of nouns and instead just put them in front of each other (with ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Why does “face” turn to “faced” when used as a compound adjective? [closed]

I ask this question out of curiosity more than anything. We use the word "face" as a noun, but when it is used in a compound adjective, it turns into "faced": The features of his face hardened. ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Is “verifyee” a word?

How could I correctly label the following diagram?
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Multiple nouns and genitive - how to tell whether it applies to all or just the last one?

Having the following definition, as a non-native speaker I find it difficult to tell its correct meaning. A planned and systematic means for assuring management that the defined standards, ...
1
vote
3answers
49 views

Neutral word for something or someone that blocks/overrides/negates/vetos something else?

I am working on a system with numerous filters for data. If some filters are applied they will automatically void other filters. E.g. if the user is searching a unique ID the date range filter will ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Can the word “publications” represent books, papers, journals, magazines, etc.?

The top-voted answer to Is there a noun representing books, papers, magazines, and all the other things one might read? is "documents" and "literature". I want to know how the word "publications" ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

How to call students enrolled one year before/after me?

Suppose student A is enrolled in a university in 2015. I wonder if there are any ways for him to call students enrolled in 2014 or 2016. Specifically, I want to complete the following sentences. ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What is the classifying noun for a person who is both a project term member and a consumer of the final product?

In a scenario where, two people, say a capenter and a plumber, are both working on a shopping mall construction project. The carpenter, lives in a foreign land, will return home when her direct ...
-2
votes
0answers
28 views

Why do they call it proper and common nouns? [closed]

I do not understand this at all, since there's no such thing as a 'non proper noun' i.e a it's either a noun or it isn't, it can't 'sort of be a noun', and a common noun might not be all that common ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Generosity has generous. What is the equivalent for animosity?

A so-called friend of mine once thanked me for my animosity. Animosity is a noun in this usage. What is the adjective associated with animosity? I guess there isn't one. But what is the closest word ...
6
votes
3answers
50 views

Are there different names for a pontoon if it is parallel or extending out from the shore?

Here we see the different terminology for wharf, a pier, a jetty and a quay - which all depend on whether they are built on piles or fill; extending out from shore or parallel to shore. Strangely ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to name on sort project by

I have a list of art and design project I do, some is for client (pay) , some is not (without pay): not start from client invite (like redesign a product exist, concept, or art ... ), or client not ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

What do you call a person who drinks alcohol with someone?

Someone you are drinking beer with. Someone who goes out for drinks with you. Not necessarily a close friend but is present during a drink with you.
4
votes
2answers
62 views

Can a noun function as an adverbial?

As we know, some noun phrases can function as adverbials (especially temporal noun phrases). Here is an example taken from Wikipedia: James answered this morning. Can a single noun function as an ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

What do you call a noun unconventionally acting as a verb?

When one uses a verb as a noun, we call that a gerund (e.g. "I love running."). However, what would we call a noun that's unconventionally being used as a verb? (e.g. "I'm going to go math.", instead ...
0
votes
0answers
90 views

What is the origin of the word 'aphotic'? Is there a noun meaning “the state of being aphotic”?

Some adjectives ending in -ic are derived from nouns. For example, hyperbolic is derived from hyperbole, and parabolic is derived from parabola. Aphotic is an adjective meaning "lightless; dark" (...
3
votes
5answers
53 views

Synonym for “chameleon”

I'm looking for a synonym for the term "chameleon" as applied to a person who easily fits in anywhere by altering their demeanor in a respectful positive and aware way, not with malicious intent. All ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Word for a person that likes to start controversy [duplicate]

Some people enjoy starting a controversy. There must be a word for them.
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Is it “transferrer” or “transferer”?

According to thefreedictionary, "transferrer" is someone who transfers something. However, it also lists the alternate spelling "transferer", with only one r in the middle. For the related "...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

What is the legal term for someone who isn't a romantic partner but lives in the same house as you?

A cohabitator but not a girlfriend or boyfriend or common-law spouse.
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Difference between match fixing and a fixed match? [closed]

Are ''match fixing'' and a ''fixed match'' the same or not? Is the one the result of the other?
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Sought: Term for nominal use of adjective [duplicate]

If this turns out to be duplicative, I apologize. Is there a concise term for the use of an adjective -- without a noun -- AS a noun? For example, instead of "Rich people often eat lobster ...
2
votes
2answers
159 views

In English, are words like 'English,' 'Monday,' and 'January' considered common nouns or proper nouns?

In English, are names of languages (English, French), days of the week (Monday, Sunday) and months of the year (November, January) considered common nouns or proper nouns? I know they're all ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

Nought point five miles. Why is it miles, plural?

I read somewhere that 0.5 mile is nought point five miles. Why is 0.5 counted as plural?
1
vote
0answers
40 views

In terms of poetry, what is the Thomas code?

I was reading a book review of Wittgenstein's Mistress on goodreads, and I came across the sentence, "Without such accessible lecture notes, I may not have ever cracked the Thomas code and may never ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Debris “is” or “are” called toxins

"Debris are called toxins." In this sentence, should I use "is" or "are"? I understand "debris" is an uncountable noun, so normally I would use "is". But I am referring to different kinds of debris. ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Question regarding the usage of “the”

Recently I noticed that one of my foreign friends who is studying English is struggling with the usage of "the". An example of a mistake she makes is "I like to study the English too because it is fun!...
2
votes
3answers
63 views

Hyphenating “process” in the meaning “series of actions” in AmE

Where to break the word "process" at the end of a line in the meaning "a series of actions" in US English? Dictionaries disagree on this (or I am misinterpreting what they say): Merriam-Webster ...
1
vote
2answers
30 views

What should you call a whooping cough or a whoop-like cough and not have it confused with the disease?

How would you tell someone that you have a whooping cough but you don't have pertussis?
0
votes
2answers
56 views

The word for the tipping point. Point of change

Looking for the word that displays the point of change, the apex, that point or event that changed something it was the "" of the day, her thoughts, the game, etc.
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Indefinite article with an abstract noun

I can't get how to use indefinite article with an abstract noun. I often see constructions like this one: indefinite article + adjective + abstract noun. I mean are there any rules when to use or not ...
3
votes
2answers
50 views

Noun for person being observed

I know that the person being interviewed is interviewee, but I cannot find the equivalent for the person being observed! Any help would be greatly appreciated.
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Using “One of the” with “Equipment” or similar mass nouns

As the question has stated, I am having a mild confusion regarding the mass nouns. Is: "Every equipment" correct? The same goes with "One of the equipment". Thank you very much.
4
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the English equivalent of gatasan?

It literally means to milk. It also means a dairy cow. It could be both a noun or verb. v. To use someone for the money he/she can give you. n. Someone (a girlfriend, husband) that you ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

What do you call those small wooden footbridges over water?

Those planks or bamboo bridges you see in some resorts and some sea settlements in Asia?
4
votes
1answer
32 views

Difference in meaning: “diplomacy” and “foreign affairs”?

In a general context, is there any difference in meaning or tone between "diplomacy" and "foreign affairs"? Consider the following case. (at a speech) I will talk about effects the TPP (Trans Pacific ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

What do you call those films with nudity, if not pornographic scenes, but not marketed as porn? [closed]

Probably has the same audience as porn but instead has mainstream studio producers and full-length cinema release.
6
votes
3answers
693 views

“There is to be no drinking beer today” What is the status of “no” and “beer” here?

There's no doubting her sincerity. There's no telling what she's done. There's no guessing which way they'll bolt. There's to be no drinking beer today. There's no telling her. The word no is ...
3
votes
3answers
507 views

The noun form of “well-defined”

What’s the noun of well-defined (meaning that something is defined well in a mathematical sense). Also, could you show me more examples of the same structure/principle (of transforming the adjective ...