Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
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0answers
52 views

The best time to go out for (a) dinner [duplicate]

I'm not sure why in some situations articles are not going before a noun. E.g. I found this sentence: The best time to go out for dinner. Why is not here a dinner? This link says that we don't ...
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1answer
74 views

Difference between “ditch”, “trench” and “gutter” [closed]

I have been trying to understand the difference between the three, is this a usage difference between American English and British English? What is the difference?
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1answer
47 views

Why are names considered proper nouns?

Names are supposed to be proper nouns because they refer to a unique entity, right? But what about when the condition of specificity is not applicable? Take the word "Albert". It's supposed to be a ...
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1answer
207 views

Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?

Growing up in Nebraska, I only knew the word "appetizing" as a adjective. Not until I converted to Judaism and married a nice Jewish girl from Flushing, Queens, did I learn that "appetizing" is a ...
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3answers
71 views

“Security was a privilege of expensive locks” [closed]

Can I say "security was a privilege of expensive locks"? I am rechecking a translation, and the use of privilege in this context seems too weird to me. Isn't "privilege" used only with people?
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2answers
81 views

Is there word for person who committed suicide? [closed]

A person who committed a theft is a thief. A person who committed murder is a killer(or murderer?). What is a person who committed suicide?
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1answer
41 views

slope-up or slope-down

Could the words slope-up or slope-down be nouns? I found them just as verbs in the dictionary, and slope as a noun. But then I see sentences such as "That slope-up was amazing." Is it correct to ...
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0answers
27 views

Clause and noun as subject in a sentence

Can I use both a clause and a noun as the subject of a sentence? For example: How the factors interact and their compound impact are not well understood. I find the meaning is clear but the ...
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1answer
66 views

Plural of “is” — “ises” or “isses”?

If I had many is words, how would I refer to them in the form of a plural? Could I use ises or isses? Example: You use entirely too many isses in your sentences.
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1answer
111 views

Difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”

What is the difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”? I found these questions: Difference between “aim” and “purpose” Difference between “purpose” and ...
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2answers
902 views

Why is the plural of “deer” the same as the singular?

Why is the plural version of deer identical to the singular version? If mouse became mice, then why did the singular deer not change to something else in the plural?
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4answers
77 views

Could “shingled” mean “pebbly”?

One of the definition of shingle is a mass of small rounded pebbles, especially on a seashore. You can say a shingle beach (more common usage in UK than US perhaps) Is it also correct ...
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0answers
37 views

Order of “noun + describing noun”

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
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2answers
68 views

What do you call a person who conducts seminar workshops?

If a resource speaker or guest speaker is someone who makes usually formal public speeches; a trainer is someone who trains; how about someone who conducts seminar workshops?
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3answers
34 views

What is the correct usage of “trailblazer”? [closed]

Let’s say I’ve invented a robot which moves a couple of meters front of me by looking to my direction. It kind of “guesses” where I’m going. So, if I call it a trailblazer, will this be a correct ...
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2answers
42 views

What do variations in “a variety/varieties” of “flower/flowers” mean?

What's the difference between these four phrases: a variety of flowers varieties of flowers a variety of flower varieties of flower I can't quite distinguish the difference between variety and ...
2
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2answers
46 views

Lobbyist's Counterpart

A lobbyist is a person tries to influence the votes of legislators on behalf of a special interest. What would the correct term be for the legislators being lobbied? Lobbyee might be a logical ...
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2answers
65 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
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2answers
193 views

Are peas countable or non-countable?

Frequently in my childhood a conversation would arise at the dinner table that went something like this; "How many peas would you like?" "About sixty please". (Laughter ensues). The question befits a ...
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4answers
140 views

Apartment building - flat building?

Does anyone in the UK say 'flat building'? I live in the US, mind, so I have no clue. It sounds a bit funny saying that. Do they say 'apartment building' instead, maybe? Or is there another word for a ...
2
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7answers
633 views

What is an official collection of laws/books/etc. called?

What do you call an official collection of passages, laws, books, etc.? I'm thinking of a very official-sounding word, like "The ___crux" "The Index" or "The Axiom" or something sounding like that... ...
4
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2answers
447 views

“Prices of” vs “prices for”

I came across two different sentences, from The Wall Street Journal, both containing the word "prices" but with different prepositions, "of" and "for". Here are the two sentences. Audi Cuts ...
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11answers
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Art and Culture are to “Philistine” as Feeling and Compassion are to what?

I'm looking for a noun to embody the adjectives "unfeeling" and "heartless" the same way Philistine embodies "uncivilized" and "crude". I'm looking for something a bit more tactful than say, "a ...
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2answers
92 views

How do you convert a noun into an adjective? [closed]

What would be the adjectives for nouns like shopkeeper, country, wife, earring, teacher, father — and so on and so forth?
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1answer
48 views

What principle guides word combinations with “almost”?

I am trying to explain to non-native speakers how to use "almost." I can't formulate (a) rule(s) to follow with regard to nouns/pronouns. So far, my only ideas are that almost can be collocated only ...
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1answer
108 views

the noun form of 'we are under the department of XXX'

The meaning I want to deliver is: We need to tell the school that we are from the department of education when we approach them. But since I want to present it in a proper way, I plan to write ...
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11answers
2k views

Are there any English one-word equivalents for “je ne sais quoi”?

Wiktionary defines je ne sais quoi as An intangible quality that makes something distinctive or attractive. She has a certain je ne sais quoi about her. Is there a single-word equivalent?
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1answer
64 views

What's a single word for the context a word is used in (used to differentiate similar words)?

I saw a question on this site asking about the difference between two similar words and one of the answers said it was the specific context each word was used in, except they used a single word that ...
3
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1answer
154 views

Terminology for “New Yorker” vs “lives in New York”

What are the terms that can be used to differentiate between these two nouns? New Yorker versus one who lives in New York A "New Yorker" would be someone who self-identifies as a practitioner ...
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2answers
54 views

Is there a good word for “unsurpassability”?

I hope that this is a good forum to post the query below, and please excuse me if it is not -- this is my first visit. I am looking for a noun that describes a state of not being surpassable or ...
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3answers
91 views

Why is the word 'Poke' obsolete?

I heard somewhere there was a word that in english translated to 3 words: pocket (small bag), pouch (regular-sized bag), and poke (large bag). I also heard that poke is now obsolete. This seems to be ...
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3answers
74 views

Difference between “novice” and “newbie” [closed]

I can say "I am a novice in English" or "I am a newbie in English". Is there any difference between these?
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1answer
54 views

Can parents “educate” their children? Or only teachers? [closed]

Many of my Asian students who are learning English say that parents can "educate" their children. However I'm not sure if this is a correct collocation in English. My understanding of "education" is ...
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5answers
155 views

What is a noun or adjective to describe somebody who juggles work, study, hobbies, family and more?

I'm trying to describe someone who burns the candle at both ends. They work full-time, they study full-time, they have creative projects on the go, they raise their family and manage their property - ...
3
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2answers
91 views

Word to Warn of Danger of Usage

I need a term or word to refer to something which is very powerful but if used naïvely will cause great harm. I could say: "This is a [noun], use with care." or: "Use this with care it is ...
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1answer
37 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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2answers
71 views

“Stadiums” vs. “stadia” [duplicate]

I'm not that old, but when I was a child/teen, stadia was the common term. As in: Wembley, the Nou Camp, and the Santiago Bernabeu are football stadia. The MCG and Lord's are cricket stadia. ...
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2answers
6k views

Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
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4answers
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“A fallacy in its own right” [closed]

Would it be correct to say or write that an "organisation is a fallacy in its own right" — by failing utterly in doing what it's supposed to do?
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1answer
94 views

“Not only one of the most talented actors of our age but kind.” — what does 'kind' mean here?

I was searching for information about the original novel "House of Cards" and from following site, in the middile of the page, there's sentence which compliment Kevin Spicey as shown ...
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12answers
2k views

Word for a person being used

I'm looking for a word to describe someone who is being used. This person would be the subject (a noun) not a verb or or adjective. Maybe like a pushover.
4
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1answer
53 views

quotes and brackets

I'm programming a parser for a new language, and need a word which references all kinds of quotes and brackets: "" '' <> () [] {} Up to now I always used "quotes and brackets", but is there ...
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1answer
35 views

Is this sentence “There are highly-compact places such as inside a vehicle” grammatically acceptable?

Or do I have to say "There are highly-compact places such as the inside of a vehicle"? Can "inside a vehicle" together be regarded as a noun? Please explain.
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1answer
71 views

Should I use “a” or “an” before nouns starting with W [duplicate]

I have seen people saying "I am an Web developer", but by googling it, we can see that "A web developer" is much more common, and probably the right way. What is the rule here, since the W from "Web" ...
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1answer
45 views

croak vs croaks vs croaking

I want to write: Do you remember the pond full of frog croaking at night? Or should it be Do you remember the pond full of frogs croaking at night? Or Do you remember the pond of frog ...
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2answers
48 views

Is the following the correct usage for the word “read”: “Read a dictionary”

Is it correct to state: "Read a dictionary". Similarly can you "Read an encyclopedia",
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2answers
42 views

A common word that describes the first level relation

A common word that describes the first level relation. First level relation: Parent for an unmarried. Spouse for a married
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2answers
53 views

Should this sentence have a singular or plural object?

Is the correct version this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as a genuine part of the book. OR this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as genuine ...
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7answers
173 views

What's a good replacement to “cookbook” as referring to general-purpose manual-like computer books?

O'Reilly published a series of "cookbooks" which are general-purpose manual-like computer books that usually have wide but shallow coverage of a topic. What's a good word that's less rhetorical than ...