Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Why is the plural of “aircraft” not “aircrafts”?

I came along this sentence: Today, we have used a large number of assets, comprising of 34 aircraft, 40 ships, hundreds of men, thousands of man-hours has been deployed I consulted dictionaries ...
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7answers
239 views

What do you call the period between having sex?

If a couple are having a romantic or sexy get away where they're staying in bed and having sex and otherwise hanging out - is there a term use for the periods where they're not actually in the act of ...
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0answers
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A synonym for the prefix intro~

Good afternoon, While working on a philosophical paper I came across a slight problem and while I searched for an answer on my own, I seem predisposed to not find any, at least not in the sense of an ...
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2answers
37 views

Can the word “imperative” be a noun? [on hold]

Here's an example: It is our imperative to bomb the volcano early, thus preventing a much larger eruption later. Is "imperative" correct there? It seems to be synonymous with "duty", or maybe ...
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3answers
30 views

Is “reservee” an acceptable word like employee?

I see one reference from an old version of Webster but not much else. Word says it is misspelled. Which is it? Our list of reservees include Beyonce, Cher, Bono...
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0answers
31 views

When did 'street', 'road', etc. start being capitalised?

Old newspapers and books seem to very rarely capitalise (and often hyphenate) phrases like "High street", "Herbert-road", and "Trusting lane". These days, we capitalise "Street", "Road", and "Lane". ...
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4answers
64 views

What do you call someone who has a disease or mental condition?

I'm looking for a noun to suffix to a condition to refer to the person who has that condition. Existing words are like: Cancer patients are subject to chemotherapy which causes them to lose ...
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3answers
57 views

which is wrong? 1. “What is your suggest?” 2. “What is your suggestion?” [closed]

which is wrong? 1. "What is your suggest?" 2. "What is your suggestion?"
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7answers
482 views

What is the word for stories/movies/poems that have a moral lesson [closed]

I am reading this book - and I have been trying to remember the word but it's eluding me. What is the word for stories/movies/poems that provide a moral lesson.
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6answers
111 views

Verb or noun for - when I am not short of words but unable to speak lucidly

A situation when I am not short of words but confused by the setting. the situation does not let me speak properly/lucidly. I kind of trip over my words. I don't know what to do. The silence was ...
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12answers
5k views

What do you call it when it's not raining, but the atmosphere causes everything to be wet?

I'm currently having a discussion with colleagues about what this is. Basically it's kind of a cloud has rolled into to ground level. It's not raining in the sense that there are no drops of water ...
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0answers
27 views

Proper names as adjectives? [closed]

I went a corporate authority to register a new company (Matilda's Recipes), and unfortunately, no apostrophe-s is allowed in company names. So now I'm thinking of changing it to "Matilda Recipes", ...
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1answer
114 views

How can you tell which noun a clause modifies?

I'm a ESOL teacher, and I'm having trouble answering a question that a student asked me recently. We were going over long sentences, and found this one from the New York Times: Saudi Arabia said ...
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2answers
87 views

What do you call a person doing a task that a computer can do better?

Is there a term for a person performing a task that a computer could perform faster/better, but the reason the person is doing it is because of a failure in a company to improve processes/systems?
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0answers
33 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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2answers
428 views

Line Art: A word like Scrimshaw or Filligree?

I'm looking for a word that refers to a fine, decorative line-work illustration that is used for accenting signage or letterhead. It's similar in usage to scrimshaw (except not a picture) or filigree ...
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2answers
64 views

What's the name of this boat?

Is there a more appropriate name for a boat like the one below? Other than fishing boat, wood boat, rowboat, canoe. Thank you
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2answers
141 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
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2answers
50 views

A person who is trying to impress somebody

What do we call a person who is trying to impress somebody (not necessarily to gain any advantage). For e.g., he buys them expensive products, always talking in a sweet manner etc. To describe an act ...
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1answer
47 views

Should corporations be referred to in the singular or plural? [duplicate]

I keep coming across articles, especially technology related ones, where corporations are referred to in the plural. Example, "Oracle have decided to make G1 the standard ..." or "Google have become ...
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2answers
52 views

Where a name related to a noun should be placed?

Say I have three kinds of items that I call A, B, and C. Now, I want to ask someone to create one. Which form is the correct one? Create an item A. or Create an A item. ?
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2answers
142 views

what article should go before specific games?

I came across an article in the below link about general and specific nouns General and specific Nouns My question is which article (grammar article) should go before these general, more specific, ...
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3answers
397 views

Is there a word for a person who is not rich, but nevertheless acts as if he's wealthy in front of strangers?

My neighbor is just like that person, so, I think to write a poem on him and desire to break his self-forgetfulness by narrating his pride to him!
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3answers
58 views

Why do we have “anxiousness”, but not “frightenness”?

Why do we have the word "anxiousness", but not the word "frighteness"? Both would mean something similar: "Being anxious" respectively Being frightened" ps: To make it even more analogous, I could ...
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3answers
217 views

Indefinite articles used with plural nouns: It was AN amazing TWO DAYS

The indefinite article a(n), derives from the old English word an meaning "one". Generally this word only occurs in determiner function before noun phrases which are singular. However, there seem to ...
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1answer
40 views

OK to use “capstone” as an adjective?

The term "capstone project" is common. Google tells me there's also something called "Capstone Classroom." The dictionary -- whatever dictionary you might look in -- says "capstone" is only ever a ...
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4answers
69 views

Term for someone who feel the need to learn

Is there any specific term for someone who feel the need of constantly learning something new ? like a learning disease. What should the appropriate term be?
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4answers
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What do you call psychological diseases that affect many people at once (or many people of a society)?

I am talking about diseases such as the Jerusalem syndrome, the Paris syndrome, and the Dancing Plague of 1518. Is there a general name for such diseases?
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1answer
50 views

Any rule for using nationality as a noun? [duplicate]

As you know there are times when using a nationality (without any modification) is a correct way to refer to a person of that nationality and there are times when it is incorrect. For example "He is a ...
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1answer
45 views

What do you call the headings along the top of a newspaper that reference later page articles?

Often newspapers have a header on the front page where they feature headlines, as well as the page number, for feature articles in later pages of the newspaper. What do you call these?
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2answers
25 views

Incisive: Noun use

Incisiveness is the noun of the incisive adjective, but in this sentence: Communication has to be incisive. It seems to me that Incisiveness doesn't work here, and incisive sounds correct, ...
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3answers
80 views

coffee vs. some coffee

I want coffee. vs. I want some coffee. Does these two sentences completely identical? In general, is it possible to delete the word "some" from every instance of "some coffee", and to keep ...
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7answers
883 views

What is a noun that means “the skill of being able to use technology efficiently?”

What is a noun that means "the skill of being able to use technology efficiently or easily?" Thanks
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Is this a noun clause or an adverbial?

I'm interested in the following question: I want to visit where my grandmother was born. To me it seems like a noun clause because I could replace the clause with a noun. For example: I want to ...
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1answer
67 views

It hurts my “feeling” vs “feelings” [closed]

One can see both variants used. Are both correct? And what the difference, if so? I suppose, when word "feeling" is used in this this context, the phrase must be extended with the mention of ...
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3answers
90 views

Fire meet gasoline: is it correct?

Is it grammatically correct to say "Fire meet gasoline", as in the Sia's song, or just poetic license?? "Flame and candle meet, fire meet gasoline Fire meet gasoline, I'm burnin' alive ...
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1answer
48 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
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5answers
138 views

Single word to define a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement

I am looking for a word that defines a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement. Just like the term "perfectionist" that defines a person who always looks for perfection. Is ...
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0answers
27 views

Use of collective nouns and verbs

I see the British normally use plural form of the verbs associated with collective nouns. An example, "The team have fired its coach" versus "The team has fired its coach". I have been told this is ...
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1answer
81 views

Opposite of a requiem [closed]

The definition of a requiem is a song which plays on one's funeral. I was wondering, is there a word which means the opposite - a song which is used as a celebration of one's birth? Thank you!
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1answer
49 views

Does orchestra need “the” before it?

Does the sentence It requires full orchestra and progressively adds each of the four brass bands need the between "requires" and "full"?
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5answers
136 views

Word for someone who can't keep up with the times?

Is there a word that means roughly 'someone who refuses to accept change and insists that things should be done in the old established way'? I'm looking for something like behind the times or has ...
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1answer
190 views

What is a person living in a hostel called?

I have heard some people say the word hostelite or hostelide but just not sure if they are proper words. P.S. I couldn't find it in any dictionary when I googled. Hosteler might be the closest. But I ...
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1answer
102 views

Is there a term for adjectives that don't, at face value, seem to apply to the noun modified?

There's a verse in Bob Seger's song Mainstreet that has this wonderful little seemingly-nonsensical word pairing: There was this long, lovely dancer in a little club downtown; I loved to watch ...
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1answer
81 views

Is “Zionist” an offensive term? [closed]

Is asking someone if they are a Zionist considered offensive? Is it equivalent to asking someone about their religious or political affiliations?
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10answers
336 views

What's an idiom or word or name for an initial tester?

What would be an idiom or word or name for someone that is an initial tester (like a beta tester). I am writing a speech for my younger brother's engagement and want to say how I have always been the ...
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14answers
1k views

Is there a single word to describe a solution that hasn't been optimized?

I am working with some code, and I would like to describe the difference in its performance when it is optimized versus when it is not optimized. Unfortunately, I can't find a word to describe the ...
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2answers
167 views

Is there a synonym for “schadenfreude” that sounds more colloquial?

Is there a more colloquial synonym for "schadenfreude"? I'm specifically looking for a noun that denotes a pleasure derived from other people's misfortunes or sufferings. Sadly, I couldn't find any ...
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7answers
3k views

Why “be king”, not “be a king”? [duplicate]

I've heard people say "be king" (as in "I can't wait to be king") in movies and TV. Why don't they say "be a king"? Which is correct?
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What is the correct possessive form of “Drs. Smith”

I want to address two Doctor Smiths via the abbreviation Drs. Smith; what is correct the possessive form of that (plural) noun phrase? Is it Drs. Smith's? An example sentence: Drs. Smith's house is ...