Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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the noun form of 'we are under the department of XXX'

The meaning I want to deliver is: We need to tell the school that we are from the department of education when we approach them. But since I want to present it in a proper way, I plan to write ...
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11answers
873 views

Are there any English one-word equivalents for “je ne sais quoi”?

Wiktionary defines je ne sais quoi as An intangible quality that makes something distinctive or attractive. She has a certain je ne sais quoi about her. Is there a single-word equivalent?
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1answer
59 views

What's a single word for the context a word is used in (used to differentiate similar words)?

I saw a question on this site asking about the difference between two similar words and one of the answers said it was the specific context each word was used in, except they used a single word that ...
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1answer
84 views

Terminology for “New Yorker” vs “lives in New York” [on hold]

What are the terms that can be used to differentiate between these two nouns? New Yorker versus one who lives in New York
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2answers
46 views

Is there a good word for “unsurpassability”?

I hope that this is a good forum to post the query below, and please excuse me if it is not -- this is my first visit. I am looking for a noun that describes a state of not being surpassable or ...
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3answers
85 views

Why is the word 'Poke' obsolete?

I heard somewhere there was a word that in english translated to 3 words: pocket (small bag), pouch (regular-sized bag), and poke (large bag). I also heard that poke is now obsolete. This seems to be ...
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3answers
62 views

Difference between “novice” and “newbie” [closed]

I can say "I am a novice in English" or "I am a newbie in English". Is there any difference between these?
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1answer
50 views

Can parents “educate” their children? Or only teachers? [closed]

Many of my Asian students who are learning English say that parents can "educate" their children. However I'm not sure if this is a correct collocation in English. My understanding of "education" is ...
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0answers
39 views

Are children considered part of “society”? [closed]

According to the English definition of society, are children considered a part of it? In many Asian cultures it is believed that one only "enters society" once one becomes an adult and finishes ...
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5answers
80 views

What is a noun or adjective to describe somebody who juggles work, study, hobbies, family and more?

I'm trying to describe someone who burns the candle at both ends. They work full-time, they study full-time, they have creative projects on the go, they raise their family and manage their property - ...
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2answers
81 views

Word to Warn of Danger of Usage

I need a term or word to refer to something which is very powerful but if used naïvely will cause great harm. I could say: "This is a [noun], use with care." or: "Use this with care it is ...
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1answer
28 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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52 views

What's the meaning of the word “kidney” in this context? [closed]

In this article, there is the sentence: Every extension proposal should be required to be accompanied by a kidney. What's the meaning of the word kidney in this context?
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2answers
68 views

“Stadiums” vs. “stadia” [duplicate]

I'm not that old, but when I was a child/teen, stadia was the common term. As in: Wembley, the Nou Camp, and the Santiago Bernabeu are football stadia. The MCG and Lord's are cricket stadia. ...
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2answers
6k views

Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
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4answers
92 views

“A fallacy in its own right” [closed]

Would it be correct to say or write that an "organisation is a fallacy in its own right" — by failing utterly in doing what it's supposed to do?
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1answer
88 views

“Not only one of the most talented actors of our age but kind.” — what does 'kind' mean here?

I was searching for information about the original novel "House of Cards" and from following site, in the middile of the page, there's sentence which compliment Kevin Spicey as shown ...
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12answers
2k views

Word for a person being used

I'm looking for a word to describe someone who is being used. This person would be the subject (a noun) not a verb or or adjective. Maybe like a pushover.
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1answer
51 views

quotes and brackets

I'm programming a parser for a new language, and need a word which references all kinds of quotes and brackets: "" '' <> () [] {} Up to now I always used "quotes and brackets", but is there ...
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1answer
35 views

Is this sentence “There are highly-compact places such as inside a vehicle” grammatically acceptable?

Or do I have to say "There are highly-compact places such as the inside of a vehicle"? Can "inside a vehicle" together be regarded as a noun? Please explain.
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0answers
32 views

Should this sentence use “is ambitious” or “is ambition”? [migrated]

Which of these two is better, and why: the first one with the adjective or the second one with the noun? I think the characteristic that best describes me is ambitious. I think the characteristic ...
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1answer
52 views

Should I use “a” or “an” before nouns starting with W [duplicate]

I have seen people saying "I am an Web developer", but by googling it, we can see that "A web developer" is much more common, and probably the right way. What is the rule here, since the W from "Web" ...
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34 views

croak vs croaks vs croaking

I want to write: Do you remember the pond full of frog croaking at night? Or should it be Do you remember the pond full of frogs croaking at night? Or Do you remember the pond of frog ...
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2answers
45 views

Is the following the correct usage for the word “read”: “Read a dictionary”

Is it correct to state: "Read a dictionary". Similarly can you "Read an encyclopedia",
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2answers
35 views

A common word that describes the first level relation

A common word that describes the first level relation. First level relation: Parent for an unmarried. Spouse for a married
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2answers
47 views

Should this sentence have a singular or plural object?

Is the correct version this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as a genuine part of the book. OR this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as genuine ...
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7answers
166 views

What's a good replacement to “cookbook” as referring to general-purpose manual-like computer books?

O'Reilly published a series of "cookbooks" which are general-purpose manual-like computer books that usually have wide but shallow coverage of a topic. What's a good word that's less rhetorical than ...
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2answers
83 views

Term for someone who lost something [duplicate]

Is there any specific term for someone who has lost something? The person who finds something can be called a finder but what about the person who has lost something? What should the appropriate term ...
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1answer
64 views

Is there a term to describe the tendency to do what's minimum?

I will try my best to describe. Some times, I have found that people tend to do the minimum procedures to finish what they do, and find improving unnecessary. I understand different people have ...
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1answer
62 views

In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
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3answers
60 views

a word for an unfamiliar situation

Is there a single word for an unfamiliar situation or a better way of wording this? If a situation is unfamiliar to you.
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2answers
506 views

What is “the culinary chops”?

The article of Time magazine (June 23, 2014) titled “Don’t blame fat” says “New science reveals fat isn’t what hurting our health, and wraps up with the following sentence. How we eat –whether we ...
2
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2answers
64 views

Is “vernissage” in common use in American English?

I'm translating a novel from Swedish to English. The book is slightly above the level of chick-lit, so I don't want it to sound too fancy. In Swedish vernissage is a common word. I have personally ...
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1answer
77 views

'Animus' — negative connotation?

The Oxford Dictionaries entry for animus reads: [mass noun] Hostility or ill feeling: [mass noun] Motivation to do something: Owing to definition 1 above, I suspect that a negative ...
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41 views

Formatting for having one noun used twice in a sentence— once, implied

I was writing some definitions for a summer project, and I came up with this sentence: In The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, the protagonist is Gregor Samsa, with events being centered around- , ...
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7answers
900 views

English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”

Is there an English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日), which means the sunshine filtering through the leaves of a tree (or trees)? It is made up of three kanji and the hiragana particle れ. The first ...
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4answers
147 views

What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?

The answer isn't off-keyness, although I wish it were. I am interested in the secondary meaning of something being off-key, in the sense that it is irregular or incongruous, for example: "An off-key ...
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0answers
18 views

Hypernym for cash flow directions [duplicate]

Is there a specific accounting-oriented hypernym for the directions of cash flow, i.e. debit and credit?
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2answers
54 views

Single word for person entitled to receive a sales commission

I need a fairly specific single word for a person who is entitled to receive a sales commission. "Agent" for example isn't specific enough. A short phrase is also usable. Adjectives ditto. The ...
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1answer
70 views

Verbal noun of pure copula - logical implications?

In her emendation of her earlier work on antilogism here, Christine Ladd-Franklin wrote ... That no human beings are immortal and no angels are mortal precludes any angels being human. [She ...
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42 views

What is the noun to describe the possible responses to the question “How did you hear about us?”

I am modelling the allowed responses for the question "How did you hear about us?" in a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) system. How would you name this type of entity?
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2answers
43 views

Dean Professor or Dean and Professor

If someone, called John, for example, has two titles that include Dean and Professor, which of the following expressions is better? Dean Professor John visits Oxford University. Dean and Professor ...
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1answer
53 views

Plural of input [duplicate]

What is the plural of input ? It proves unclear which is correct, input or inputs --- or both up to context of usage.
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3answers
166 views

Is the word “comparator” widely used outside of IT and computing — say, in statistics?

I came across the word “comparator” in the report of International Monetary Fund under the title, “Can women save Japan?” (WP/12/248) co-authored by Chad Steinberg and Masao Nakane “Japan has FLP ...
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2answers
93 views

Is “panko” a common word?

I recently found the word panko in a dictionary. It is derived from the Japanese word "パン粉" and means bread crumbs. Is panko a common word in English? For example, can I ask supermarket staff "Where ...
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5answers
329 views

What is one’s mother-in-law’s mother-in-law called?

What is one’s mother-in-law’s mother-in-law called?
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2answers
448 views

“Foxen” versus “oxes”

What is the difference between fox and box versus ox, that the first two are pluralized as foxes and boxes, whereas the last one is pluralized oxen? Note: I know how to pluralize them. What I want ...
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2answers
49 views

Are the nouns “End” and “Ending” interchangeable?

The Free Dictionary says that Ending is "a conclusion or termination, a concluding part; a finale: a happy ending.", among others. And for "End" it says "either extremity of something that has length: ...
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1answer
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Plural forms in noun + noun couple

At first, let's take 2 example expressions: "Books list" and "Book list". As far as I know, the first one is incorrect and I should use the second one - "Book list". And it means "List of books". But ...
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3answers
83 views

What is an antonym for “sin”? [duplicate]

I need to know the opposite of sin, other than virtue which I don't think is right.