Phrases which, as a unit, act as a noun; and whose heads are nouns or pronouns. English noun phrases can include (among many other possibilities) articles or determiners such as "the" and "a" and one or more adjectives or other nouns used attributively followed by the head noun itself.

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2answers
235 views

When does the phrase “Some of us…” include the speaker?

I do not recall ever hearing anyone say "Some of us..." without including themselves. It appears to me that oneself is assumed to be part of the subject. However, some of is usually used to denote an ...
2
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2answers
121 views

Adverbs in noun phrase coordination

Consider the following example sentence: The ball often hit the tree and never the man. I am trying to represent this sentence as a constituency-based parse tree, but I am having a hard time ...
4
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2answers
79 views

Relative clauses: “I did the best I could.”

I did the best I could. The sentence above can be rephrased: I did the best that I could. In these two examples (that) I could is a relative clause. However, I am not sure whether it is ...
10
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3answers
2k views

Why are “colleagues” becoming “work colleagues”?

I've noticed over the last few years that people who were formerly my colleagues have become my work colleagues. Does anyone know why this should be so? (Perhaps I should also mention that the ...
1
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1answer
180 views

Discontinuous noun phrase and apposition involving object complements

I was wondering whether these uses of discontinuity are valid. Here are two uses I would like to question: The use of discontinuous noun phrase: [1a] He made the system useless that could have ...
2
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1answer
280 views

Plural modifying noun [duplicate]

Where can I learn about the English rules for noun phrases in which a modifying noun is semantically plural? We say "Horse trainer," not "horses trainer", even though there is usually more than one ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Is this Clause or falls under some other category

a finding that has shocked most observers. Full sentence: studies have shown that X is 60 percent of Y, a finding that has shocked most observers. What is your opinion. Isn't it that the above is a ...
4
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3answers
856 views

apostrophe that goes with a noun which precedes a relative clause

Suppose you wanted to place a possessive apostrophe in this sentence: Billy, who goes to my school, favorite game is tag. I know it's not standard, but I can hear kids (or older) saying an s sound ...
230
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5answers
87k views

What is the rule for adjective order?

I remember being taught that the correct order of adjectives in English was something along the lines of "Opinion-Size-Age-Color-Material-Purpose." However, it's been a long time and I'm pretty sure ...
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3answers
60 views

Word for academic fields that are aligned with a political movement or position?

Is there a word or phrase for academic fields that are aligned with a political movement or position? For example: Feminist studies is aligned with feminism. African American studies is closely ...
12
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3answers
185 views

a [box [of apples] ] vs [a box] [of apples]

The standard linguistic analysis of the NP a box of apples is that we have a determiner (a) which acts on (modifies?) box of apples. (For an example of standard analysis, see e.g. Fig. 6 here). ...
2
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2answers
83 views

Difference between an adverb modifying an NP consisting a single noun, and an adverb modifying a noun

Consider the following examples: The work is mostly Kim's. Only Kim resigned. A question some of us had (e.g. here and here) was, aren't these examples of adverbs modifying nouns (which they are not ...
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2answers
43 views

Do noun phrases comprise prepositions too?

Do noun phrases comprise prepositions too? For example: The apple in the fridge is mine. Here the noun phrase is "The apple in the fridge" or just "The apple"?
11
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2answers
284 views

Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?

In Chapter 4 of the book A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar, written by Rodney Huddleston of the University of Queensland and Geoffrey K. Pullum of the University of Edinburgh and published ...
0
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1answer
18 views

What do I capitalize in this sentence?

I'm writing a paper about the lives of aristocratic women during the Heian period in Japan and I'm wondering about how to capitalize certain nouns in this sentence: "In Heian japan, there were many ...
1
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1answer
104 views

I have difficulty using long subject

It is hard to use long noun phrase subject. I hope to make it easy to read. For example, The relation between luminance and pupil area under dynamic condition will be computed. In this case, ...
-1
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2answers
397 views

mixed functional and non-functional requirement

Some background. Functional requirement of a web service is concerned with the correctness of the web service's function — say, the service will always return a number that is less than two. The ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Plural of noun and concept takes singular verb?

Why does a pairing of a noun and phrase about it, specifically with a question word, take a singular verb? Generically: [Noun] and [idea about noun] [singular verb].† Example: Language ...
9
votes
1answer
979 views

When can a noun be used attributively?

Nouns can modify nouns: cat food, coffee cup, gold ring, laser surgery, flood insurance. It seems to me there are even cases where a noun sounds better than the corresponding adjective: sociology ...
0
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2answers
188 views

Explaining “despite” as a preposition

My question is provoked by a desire to better explain to my students grammatical conventions regarding "despite." I am finding that my own explanatory resources come up short in this regard. ...
2
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3answers
155 views

“He was neither seer nor prophet” How would you explain the absence of an article?

Here's a fragment from Jack London's Star Rover: Wordsworth knew. He was neither seer nor prophet, but just ordinary man like you or any man. What he knew you know, any man knows. But he most ...
4
votes
2answers
89 views

When parsing the noun phrase…which is modifying which?

Closest feeling to death is pain. The noun phrase is "closest feeling to death". But I don't know how to parse this sentence...there seem to be two ways to parse this sentence. A. {Closest [...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

A phrase consisting of a “floating” noun and some verbiage following it

The question is on phrases like the ones that begin the following sentences. (a) Her chin on the tabletop, she looked at me. (b) His back turned to the door, he was writing a letter. (c) ...
1
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1answer
159 views

What is the difference between those two sentences (grammatically and in meaning)?

An inappropriate TV show for children should be banned on any type of channels. A TV show inappropriate for children should be banned on any type of channels. It seems to me that there is a ...
3
votes
2answers
634 views

Is “hanging bats” a participial phrase, gerund phrase, or simple noun phrase?

In the sentence "Hanging bats populate most of the caves in North America," what is the role of "hanging bats"? I believe it is a simple noun phrase containing the participle "hanging" (which ...
0
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2answers
96 views

how long can a noun phrase be?

The ruby in the hand of the devil at the top of the mountain in the country conquered by the army of devils existing until now does not make any sense. Like this sentence, is it allowed to modify ...
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3answers
1k views

Meaning of 'sky high'?

China is a rich country, yet food prices are sky high. The word 'sky' seems an adjective.
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2answers
191 views

Do these two sentences use the possessive case of gerunds properly?

Gerunds have proven to be adequate forms of "annoyances" to me and have thus led me to inquire their properties and uses. I would appreciate it if anyone could provide me with assistance in this ...
7
votes
7answers
936 views

“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Is there a word or a special phrase in English to describe the curvy upper lip that some people like Rio Ferdinand have?

I don't think many have people have that kind of upper lip (probably 10% of the population). To me personally, that kind of upper lip definitely makes a person more attractive regardless of gender. ...
1
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1answer
53 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok when I ...
3
votes
2answers
421 views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around here?...
95
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6answers
103k views

“My wife and I's seafood collaboration dinner”

I just stumbled upon a Reddit post titled: My wife and I's seafood collaboration dinner. How does it look? Sure enough, the top comment immediately points out that it should be "my wife's and my"...
12
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4answers
1k views

“This box of matches is empty”

There are several Japanese books teaching Japanese students how to write in English. I found this example in 『英作文参考書の誤りを正す』 (Correcting Errors in English Composition Manuals) by Michio Kawakami and J....
2
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2answers
71 views
1
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2answers
453 views

Usage of definite articles in noun phrases

I am writing a research paper and English is my second language. I am fully confused with the usage of a/an/the in the noun phrases with the structure (noun of noun). for example, consider this ...
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1answer
63 views

What is the head noun in 'the number of' phrases?

What is the head noun in the noun phrase 'the number of koalas'? My concern is with the non-defining relative clause and the assignment of 'which' to one of the nouns in the NP. My sentences read: ...
9
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3answers
674 views

*all of us's friend

There's this funny gap I tried to write a paper once upon a time when I studied linguistics, and I'd like to know if anyone has insight into it. The construction in question is the possessive ...
1
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1answer
95 views

Coordination of nouns with determiners

These sentences are from some data set used for evaluating programs that automatically process languages, but I am doubtful about their grammaticality. (1) A man and woman are talking (2) The boy and ...
1
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0answers
328 views

Stress on noun + noun phrases

When two nouns are combined, the stress is usually on the first noun, as in MILK bottle, DOG house, DOORknob, and POTATO salad. However, if the first noun denotes a place, the stress seems to be on ...
2
votes
2answers
606 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

What kind of phrase is this? [manically across the stage]

In the sentence: At the beginning of the play, the entire cast dances maniacally across the stage. What kind of phrase is [manically across the stage]? Is it an adverb phrase, prepositional phrase or (...
3
votes
3answers
820 views

Englishman and British man

Why is it Englishman, Frenchman, etc. (one word) but British man (two words)?
1
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2answers
27 views

The demand for the stock /The demand for stock or Demand for the stock?

Context: a stock (traded in a stock exchange) was defined prior to the appearance of the following sentence: The demand for the stock/the demand for stock/demand for the stock decreases significantly....
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2answers
395 views

“Whomever runs it's” or “whomever runs its”?

I know that "its" is the possessive form of "it", but does this rule apply to the possessive form of phrases ending in "it"? Should I say, "the program runs on whomever runs its computer" or "the ...
0
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2answers
306 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by Nino....
2
votes
1answer
140 views

Who came up with “mascara lights” on cars?

Mascara lights are LED daytime running lights or lamps, typically in a wavy or curved pattern: This photo shows DRLs on an Audi A4-B8: When and where did this term originate? Is it an Audi coinage?...
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2answers
946 views

Why is “thought” (verb III) a noun in “Nice thought”? [closed]

I often hear someone says, "Wow, that's such a nice thought!" Movies and books often have that kind of dialogue as well. As I figure it out, "a nice thought" is a noun phrase. Which means "nice" is ...
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3answers
2k views

Noun-adjective-noun: Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle?

Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle as in the following examples? car new tires salad high-calorie dressing house external wall nitrogen fine droplets These examples ...