Phrases which, as a unit, act as a noun; and whose heads are nouns or pronouns. English noun phrases can include (among many other possibilities) articles or determiners such as "the" and "a" and one or more adjectives or other nouns used attributively followed by the head noun itself.

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219
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4answers
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What is the rule for adjective order?

I remember being taught that the correct order of adjectives in English was something along the lines of "Opinion-Size-Age-Color-Material-Purpose." However, it's been a long time and I'm pretty sure ...
89
votes
6answers
83k views

“My wife and I's seafood collaboration dinner”

I just stumbled upon a Reddit post titled: My wife and I's seafood collaboration dinner. How does it look? Sure enough, the top comment immediately points out that it should be "my wife's and ...
12
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4answers
1k views

“This box of matches is empty”

There are several Japanese books teaching Japanese students how to write in English. I found this example in 『英作文参考書の誤りを正す』 (Correcting Errors in English Composition Manuals) by Michio Kawakami and ...
10
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2answers
236 views

Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?

In Chapter 4 of the book A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar, written by Rodney Huddleston of the University of Queensland and Geoffrey K. Pullum of the University of Edinburgh and published ...
9
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1answer
921 views

When can a noun be used attributively?

Nouns can modify nouns: cat food, coffee cup, gold ring, laser surgery, flood insurance. It seems to me there are even cases where a noun sounds better than the corresponding adjective: sociology ...
9
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3answers
642 views

*all of us's friend

There's this funny gap I tried to write a paper once upon a time when I studied linguistics, and I'd like to know if anyone has insight into it. The construction in question is the possessive ...
7
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7answers
838 views

“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
6
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2answers
2k views

Why are “colleagues” becoming “work colleagues”?

I've noticed over the last few years that people who were formerly my colleagues have become my work colleagues. Does anyone know why this should be so? (Perhaps I should also mention that the ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
5
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5answers
1k views

“In person” equivalent for inanimate objects

This is much easier to explain by example. So you might hear someone say this photo of her is ok, but she looks much better in person. I am looking for the equivalent of "in person" that applies to ...
5
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2answers
2k views

If a noun phrase is made of two noun-like words that conjugate differently, then which conjugation do you use? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Neither Michael nor Albert is correct” or “Neither Michael nor Albert are correct”? Is “either you or [third-person]” followed by a ...
4
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3answers
429 views

Parsing of a compound noun with many words

How should I understand this phrase: "threat analysis model", which means: An analysis model of threat, or put in parentheses: (threat(analysis model) A model of threat analysis: (threat analysis ...
4
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3answers
747 views

apostrophe that goes with a noun which precedes a phrase

Suppose you wanted to place a possessive apostrophe in this sentence: Billy, who goes to my school, favorite game is tag. I know it's not standard, but I can hear kids (or older) saying an s sound ...
4
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2answers
74 views

When parsing the noun phrase…which is modifying which?

Closest feeling to death is pain. The noun phrase is "closest feeling to death". But I don't know how to parse this sentence...there seem to be two ways to parse this sentence. A. ...
3
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4answers
2k views

Is there a word or a special phrase in English to describe the curvy upper lip that some people like Rio Ferdinand have?

I don't think many have people have that kind of upper lip (probably 10% of the population). To me personally, that kind of upper lip definitely makes a person more attractive regardless of gender. ...
3
votes
1answer
326 views

Is “the many” grammatical? [closed]

The homework is as following As it stands, our rule allows just one determiner in an NP. NP → (D) (AdjP+) N (PP+) (CP) (PP+) How can we revise this rule to account for the following data: ...
3
votes
3answers
777 views

Englishman and British man

Why is it Englishman, Frenchman, etc. (one word) but British man (two words)?
3
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2answers
568 views

Is “hanging bats” a participial phrase, gerund phrase, or simple noun phrase?

In the sentence "Hanging bats populate most of the caves in North America," what is the role of "hanging bats"? I believe it is a simple noun phrase containing the participle "hanging" (which ...
3
votes
2answers
554 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
3
votes
2answers
204 views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around ...
2
votes
2answers
159 views

Is it right to use 'Statesman' to modify an organization and corporation?

I found a case of using statesman in modifying AOL Inc. in the following sentence of New York Times (February 8). Statesman to me means a leading politician_ and I understand the word here was used ...
2
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1answer
183 views

Fashionable photographers

I saw somewhere this quote from Wodehouse's Meet Mr. Mulliner (1927): "Statistics show that the two classes of the community which least often marry are milkmen and fashionable photographers – ...
2
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1answer
31 views

Plural of noun and concept takes singular verb?

Why does a pairing of a noun and phrase about it, specifically with a question word, take a singular verb? Generically: [Noun] and [idea about noun] [singular verb].† Example: Language ...
2
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2answers
69 views

What's the difference between “Speakers of English” and “English speakers”?

What's the difference between "Speakers of English" and "English speakers"?
2
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1answer
95 views

What kind of phrase is this? [manically across the stage]

In the sentence: At the beginning of the play, the entire cast dances maniacally across the stage. What kind of phrase is [manically across the stage]? Is it an adverb phrase, prepositional phrase or ...
2
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3answers
150 views

“He was neither seer nor prophet” How would you explain the absence of an article?

Here's a fragment from Jack London's Star Rover: Wordsworth knew. He was neither seer nor prophet, but just ordinary man like you or any man. What he knew you know, any man knows. But he most ...
2
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1answer
2k views

When adding prefixes to noun phrases, should you hyphenate? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase When adding a prefix to a noun, I've been taught to usually ...
2
votes
2answers
37 views

Difference between an adverb modifying an NP consisting a single noun, and an adverb modifying a noun

Consider the following examples: The work is mostly Kim's. Only Kim resigned. A question some of us had (e.g. here and here) was, aren't these examples of adverbs modifying nouns (which they are not ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

A phrase consisting of a “floating” noun and some verbiage following it

The question is on phrases like the ones that begin the following sentences. (a) Her chin on the tabletop, she looked at me. (b) His back turned to the door, he was writing a letter. (c) ...
2
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1answer
136 views

Who came up with “mascara lights” on cars?

Mascara lights are LED daytime running lights or lamps, typically in a wavy or curved pattern: This photo shows DRLs on an Audi A4-B8: When and where did this term originate? Is it an Audi ...
1
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3answers
2k views

Noun-adjective-noun: Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle?

Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle as in the following examples? car new tires salad high-calorie dressing house external wall nitrogen fine droplets These examples ...
1
vote
2answers
344 views

“Whomever runs it's” or “whomever runs its”?

I know that "its" is the possessive form of "it", but does this rule apply to the possessive form of phrases ending in "it"? Should I say, "the program runs on whomever runs its computer" or "the ...
1
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2answers
159 views

Do these two sentences use the possessive case of gerunds properly?

Gerunds have proven to be adequate forms of "annoyances" to me and have thus led me to inquire their properties and uses. I would appreciate it if anyone could provide me with assistance in this ...
1
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2answers
766 views

Why is “thought” (verb III) a noun in “Nice thought”? [closed]

I often hear someone says, "Wow, that's such a nice thought!" Movies and books often have that kind of dialogue as well. As I figure it out, "a nice thought" is a noun phrase. Which means "nice" is ...
1
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2answers
422 views

Noun phrase after “show”

The following sentences all involve the verb "show" followed by a noun phrase. Number 6 sounds a bit weird, and the last one is just wrong — but why is that? The video shows the ...
1
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1answer
58 views

What is the head noun in 'the number of' phrases?

What is the head noun in the noun phrase 'the number of koalas'? My concern is with the non-defining relative clause and the assignment of 'which' to one of the nouns in the NP. My sentences read: ...
1
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2answers
169 views

What do we call this noun phrase?

"My dear Professor, surely a sensible person like yourself can call him by his name? All this 'You-Know-Who' nonsense - for eleven years I have been trying to persuade people to call him by his ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

What is the difference between those two sentences (grammatically and in meaning)?

An inappropriate TV show for children should be banned on any type of channels. A TV show inappropriate for children should be banned on any type of channels. It seems to me that there is ...
1
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1answer
48 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok ...
1
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2answers
317 views

Usage of definite articles in noun phrases

I am writing a research paper and English is my second language. I am fully confused with the usage of a/an/the in the noun phrases with the structure (noun of noun). for example, consider this ...
1
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2answers
27 views

The demand for the stock /The demand for stock or Demand for the stock?

Context: a stock (traded in a stock exchange) was defined prior to the appearance of the following sentence: The demand for the stock/the demand for stock/demand for the stock decreases ...
1
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1answer
157 views

Plural modifying noun

Where can I learn about the English rules for noun phrases in which a modifying noun is semantically plural? We say "Horse trainer," not "horses trainer", even though there is usually more than one ...
1
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1answer
89 views

Coordination of nouns with determiners

These sentences are from some data set used for evaluating programs that automatically process languages, but I am doubtful about their grammaticality. (1) A man and woman are talking (2) The boy and ...
1
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1answer
94 views

I have difficulty using long subject

It is hard to use long noun phrase subject. I hope to make it easy to read. For example, The relation between luminance and pupil area under dynamic condition will be computed. In this case, ...
1
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3answers
1k views

Meaning of 'sky high'?

China is a rich country, yet food prices are sky high. The word 'sky' seems an adjective.
0
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2answers
245 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“The powers above”

I found the following comment left in a website: There was an offer to merge, but the API was completely different and I gave up with the negative feedback. The attached zips were as far as I got, ...
0
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2answers
58 views

how long can a noun phrase be?

The ruby in the hand of the devil at the top of the mountain in the country conquered by the army of devils existing until now does not make any sense. Like this sentence, is it allowed to ...
0
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2answers
420 views

How to associate a participle with an exact word in a sentence like 'List of items'?

I have a problem with a sentence "A list of items grouped by category". There are two possible ways to understand this sentence: (A list of items) that is grouped by category A list of (items that ...
0
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1answer
16 views

What do I capitalize in this sentence?

I'm writing a paper about the lives of aristocratic women during the Heian period in Japan and I'm wondering about how to capitalize certain nouns in this sentence: "In Heian japan, there were many ...