Questions concerning the devising or choosing of names for things.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
6answers
3k views

Evoking more power than “Titan” [closed]

EVE Online is a multiplayer game that takes place across a fictional galaxy called New Eden. Players pilot spaceships and fight for territory in large collaborative corporations. Here is a simplified ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

When should I capitalise eucalyptus or other genuses?

I'm reasonably familiar with the capitalisation and italicisation rules that govern scientific names, but am a bit confused about capitalising, or not, the name of a genus, e.g. Eucalyptus when used ...
-2
votes
3answers
321 views

Tourism nomenclature help [closed]

I'm working in a software company working on an information system for travel agencies. Because we've grown big, we've decided to rename our internal project nomenclatore from Czech to English. I ...
3
votes
2answers
353 views

Is there a term for the device of titling named chapters in a work of fiction?

Does anyone know if there's a term that describes the device of titling chapters in a work of fiction? That is, chapters not simply called "Chapter 1", "Chapter 2", etc., but chapters with unique ...
2
votes
2answers
817 views

A word to mention a set of products sold together with a bundle price?

Is there a word to refer to a set of products sold together, with a specific price? For example: Product A is sold 10 dollars Product B is sold 10 dollars Product A and B are sold together for 18 ...
1
vote
1answer
140 views

What does one call terms like “astroturfing”?

Astroturfing is a word used to describe a fake or counterfeit grassroots campaign. The clever term is derived from the notion that one kind of fake grass is astroturf. Another more niche example is ...
1
vote
2answers
577 views

“Institution”, “body” or “organ”

I'm a non-native speaker active in a labor union that does not use English internally. The union has a representative assembly (made up of representatives of branches), whose existence is mandated by ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

Why are bacteria referred to using botanic terms (flora, blooming)?

I've seen a lot of information lately about intestinal flora or gut flora but I was under the impression that flora refers exclusively to plant life. So how did bacteria come to be called flora? I ...
19
votes
13answers
3k views

What do you call the time period between notification of an event and the event?

I'm in the situation where I have an event, and I want to notify some people 15 minutes before that event happens (but it could be 30 minutes, or 1 day, or any amount of time). What do you call that ...
6
votes
9answers
17k views

What is another word for “boss” for a company with a flatter hierarchy?

In today's more modern companies (especially IT startups etc.) that have a flatter hierarchy, the word "boss" seems to be outdated and doesn't describe the job role of someone who takes care of a ...
8
votes
2answers
4k views

Why do they call it a “movement” in music? Is this a metaphor?

I can't understand this. In symphony you hear the word "movement" to refer to independent sections. But it seems that it's not really that relevant. Movement almost everywhere has something to do with ...
3
votes
2answers
503 views

“Flowers” card suit?

Is there some time or place where the clubs card suit is called "flowers" in English? This is their usual name in such languages as Italian ("fiori"), but has it ever been the case in English? I ...
2
votes
5answers
6k views

Meaning and etymology of the “ite” and “ine/ene” endings of mineral names

I’ve noticed that a very large proportion of the names of mineral species and mineral groups end in -ite and (less commonly,) -ine or -ene. Here are some examples off the top of my head: -ite: ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the opposite of the perfect aspect?

Most tenses exist in a perfect and non-perfect form, e.g. present vs. present perfect and past continuous vs. past perfect continuous. What is the group of tenses that are not perfect called?
12
votes
2answers
9k views

“Semitic” and “anti-Semitic”

Why does Semitic refer to several groups of people, including Babylonians, Assyrians, Arabs and Jews, whereas anti-Semitic only refers to Jews?
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why are not all grains called “grains”?

In most languages, the word used for a single caryopsis seed is a good equivalent of grain — it is not only the translation for this kind of seeds, but also the translation for other meanings of the ...
9
votes
9answers
82k views

What do I call a person who is participating in a survey?

I am writing about a survey I wrote to evaluate the usability of a program. When describing the methodology of the survey, I refer to the person conducting the survey as the investigator. What should ...
3
votes
2answers
309 views

“maple tree” or “maple”?

Is it correct to say maple tree, or would maple be both correct and enough to mean a tree (not just its fruit)?
1
vote
2answers
202 views

Is single usage of “personality” in “Multiple Personality” jargon or correct English?

Should not the "personality" have been pluralized in "Multiple Personality Disorder"? Is the single usage of "personality" with prepending "multiple" a professional jargon or it is the correct ...
7
votes
1answer
790 views

What is the origin of “kiwifruit”?

What is the origin of kiwifruit? Is there any relation between the fruit and New Zealand?
2
votes
5answers
285 views

Is there one word that clearly describes the difference in kind for these four types?

I am stuck on a word choice problem. I have a large amount of response related data, which were previously stored such that each datum lay within one of the following realms: law enforcement ...
4
votes
5answers
6k views

What word best describes a small store that sells only glasses (spectacles)?

What word would or combination of words would best describe a small store, in which only glasses (spectacles) are sold? Here are some of my guesses, but I think they are all wrong: Eye ware Glass ...
5
votes
5answers
12k views

What is a word called that has more than one syllable?

You can say e.g.: The word "on" is a monosyllable. but it seems that the word "multisyllable" has been outdated since 1913. What is the correct term for a word that has two or more syllables, ...
13
votes
6answers
1k views

Why did the word “Internet” change from a noncount to count noun?

I remember a time back in 1993 - 1994 for a couple months at our university the Internet was used as a noncount noun, so we would say: Do you have Internet at your university? In fact, the ...