A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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16
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2answers
902 views

If I invent a word, what language is it?

I invented a word using medical terminology, Latin and maybe a bit of Greek. (I'm not honestly sure of the etymology of all the morphemes.) Considering that this word is primarily not of English ...
20
votes
4answers
42k views

Is there a more common phrase that means “preponed”?

I was aware of this and this stackexchange post discuss the same. There is no prepone in English. Ok, then how do I say Our meeting is preponed in correct way? What is the correct word/phrase for ...
0
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3answers
853 views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
9
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3answers
786 views

When does a neologism cease to be a neologism?

What benchmarks or useful signs can be found to declassify neologisms? Obviously, inclusion in a dictionary is as likely as anything to declare a neologism a word but what happens just before that ...
8
votes
4answers
739 views

Is versionize a real word?

Is the word "versionize" a real word or is it a form of bastardization of English? Additional Info: I came across this word in a software feature tracker. The feature called for something in the ...
3
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2answers
2k views

What is the story behind the word “hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia”?

Was someone just trying to be funny by being ironic?
8
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4answers
3k views

Should proper nouns used as verbs be capitalized?

When a proper noun like "Skype" is used as a verb ("Skyping"), should it be capitalized? My thinking is that it should be capitalized because the root is a proper noun. Does anyone know of a rule ...
7
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3answers
2k views

Are there any cases where “prepend” cannot be replaced by “prefix”?

"Prepend" is seeing a fair amount of use, both in programmer jargon and elsewhere. Its use seems to come from a desire to create a word that is a direct parallel to "append." However, such a word ...
7
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4answers
2k views

Is there a word akin to “hungry” or “thirsty” that implies a need to urinate?

Sometimes my brain (maybe because I'm not a native English speaker) tends to come up with logical extensions to common formats; in this case, more than once I caught myself thinking (not out loud, ...
5
votes
3answers
488 views

Good term for a business partner and competitor?

In our line of work we often work with other companies as partners on some jobs, and then compete against them on other jobs. So they are partners and competitors. Is there a good term for this, ...
3
votes
1answer
730 views

Ending a sentence with “because [noun].”

I've noticed an interesting usage where "because [noun]." is used at the end of a sentence to mean "because [...everything that word implies. Nothing more needs to be said]". It often has a wry or ...
3
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5answers
2k views

What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
7
votes
3answers
1k views

What part-of-speech will the new “because” be?

The American Dialect Society has voted because as the Word of the Year owing to its increased use in phrases such as "because happy," "because sad," and "because bored." Since it takes an object, it ...
15
votes
15answers
11k views

What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?

Not necessarily a virgin, but someone that has consciously chosen to stay single for life (and is content with that decision). Hopefully, there is a single word for it. Example: Ralph Nader UPDATE: ...
10
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9answers
1k views

Compressed vs. zipped

Is it correct English to use the term zipped instead of compressed when dealing with computer files? Is it a neologism that is widely accepted as part of modern English?
7
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5answers
226 views

Term shorter than “microblog” as generic equivalent of “tweet”

I search rather than Google and vacuum rather than Hoover. Technically I microblog rather than tweet, but it just doesn't sound as snappy. Is there a short (single syllable?), established, generic ...
5
votes
6answers
399 views

What is a word for “experts' self-serving practice”?

Is there any word to refer to the practice of experts in a given field aiming at maintaining their position as experts, rather than producing anything that could possibly challenge their position? I ...
3
votes
7answers
2k views

Is there a suffix for loathing?

For instance trichomania is a love of hair, and trichophobia is a fear of hair. But what suffix would denote a loathing of hair? Edit: Maybe I'm looking at the wrong end of the word, and I should be ...
6
votes
12answers
2k views

What would you call the object of an activity one does for fun?

For instance, the object related to cooking is a "dish", when playing it is "sport" or "game", when singing it's a "song". Which single term would describe the object for the general act of doing ...
5
votes
3answers
436 views

Which of these two should be preferred: “sinification” or “sinicization”?

Which of these two options would be considered most elegant / correct? Personally I think Sinicization (or Sinicisation) has a more natural ring to it, but I have seen Sinification used also. Also, ...
4
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3answers
3k views

Should it be an “unlike” or “dislike” button on Facebook?

I see an increasing demand for an unlike button on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Unlike-Button/72641866357 Facebook Adds An Unlike Button For Pages May 7, 2010 Facebook "Unlike" ...
3
votes
2answers
11k views

Verbing, or turning nouns into verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is it called when a non-verb is used as a verb? The phenomenon of turning a noun into a verb is very common. Some are more well known, like "shouldering the blame" ...
1
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3answers
2k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
1
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3answers
464 views

Is there a term for French words adopted by the English language, such as “hors d'oeuvres” or “objet d'art”

I would call them "Frenchisms" or some such -ism, but I figured I'd at least ask first. So is there a name for such adopted foreign phrases? Also, how about those adopted from languages other than ...
-1
votes
1answer
68 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [closed]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
-2
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1answer
1k views

How is a word coined? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? What if I want to use the term supertibi somewhere accompanying superego? We have superego ...