A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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5answers
285 views

It's not 'suicide'. What is it? [closed]

It's not suicide 'Suicide' means suicide, n.1 a. One who dies by his own hand; one who commits self-murder. Also, one who attempts or has a tendency to commit suicide. suicide, n.2 a. The ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Compounds in works of fiction [closed]

I'm a non-native speaker. Recently, I read Child Of God by Cormac McCarthy. McCarthy seems to have a habit of making up "new words" when it suits him. E.g. The pipe crashed into the room in a ...
3
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3answers
161 views

What is a “foreign fighter”?

I was inspired to ask this question (on ELL) because of something in a CNN article that didn't sound right to me. Per capita, Belgium has the highest number of foreign fighters in Syria of any ...
-6
votes
1answer
62 views

New word “patrogony” [closed]

I have searched years, picking some very bright brains. So far, no one I know or can google has a satisfactory name for the sexual reversal of "misogyny*". I nominate either of two: 1. ...
24
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7answers
3k views

What is a one-word synonym for “religious symbol”?

What is a one-word synonym for "religious symbol"? Examples: The Cross, Star of David, Khanda, etc. Alternatively, if such a word does not exist, a neologism would suffice. Here is a casual ...
9
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3answers
567 views

What do you call two consecutive months; a sixth of a year?

Half a year is a semester, i.e. (literally) 6 months. Since it’s often wrongly thought to derive from semi- ‘half’, there’re contradicting definitions of similar terms: Both a trimester and a (rare) ...
3
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4answers
218 views

Word for someone ignorant of, but not expected to be knowledgeable about, something

A discussion arose in our office which brought about remembrance of an old term used by William F. Buckley, Jr. — from his old National Review days — in his "Word of the Day." We can't find the term ...
3
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1answer
47 views

Is there a term for the point in time when a product can begin to use itself?

I know there is the term "dogfooding" and have even found other variations on the phrase "... eat our own dog food": "drinking our own champaign" "eating our own cooking" "ice cream our customers ...
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6answers
4k views

Is there a pre-Internet term for “gamification”?

Gamification is a relatively new term which was coined and has been made highly popular in the Internet era. From the related Wikipedia article: Though the term "gamification" was coined in 2002 ...
5
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3answers
3k views
7
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5answers
887 views

Is “scurryfunge” a new word?

Recently I found the following definition for the word "scurryfunge": (Verb) Old English; to rush around cleaning when company is on their way over. Usage: I scurryfunge when I see my ...
7
votes
1answer
112 views

On throwing alligators through windows

Over at the excellent Lowering the Bar there is a discussion on throwing alligators through windows:- Let’s apply that definition to our infenestrated alligator. Absolutely, but first let’s ...
-1
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1answer
29 views

Live or living wich is common error? [duplicate]

(a) I am living in London for a few months (b) I have been living in London for a few months what is the difference? Is (a) a common error?
7
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4answers
1k views

Exact adjective of “conundrum”

I am about to coin the word 'conundrous' because I needed it (and I think it deserves a place in the dictionary)! I would like comments on what you think about that (in the context of a serious ...
2
votes
7answers
11k views

What do you call someone who is obsessed with video games?

I need a slang word which means someone addicted to playing video or computer games. Could gameaholic work? It can't be nerd or geek because although those expressions denote someone who is ...
2
votes
5answers
3k views

What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
3
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2answers
141 views

What is the English term, when someone provides truthful 'extra' information in support to promote own propaganda?

Though the title asks the main question, I will give an example. Imagine a tabloid, which wants to defame a famous personality, say Abraham Lincoln or Michael Jackson. The writers know that, just ...
6
votes
1answer
106 views

Origin of the term 'truther' as applied to conspiracy theorists

Today's Oakland [California] Tribune has a story from the Palm Beach [Florida] Post carrying the headline, "Sandy Hook truther fired by college." The story is evidently quite similar to one that ...
4
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4answers
302 views

Why is it always women and not men in: “Soccer mom,” “Tiger mom,” “Helicopter mom,” “Wal-Mart mom,” and “Security mom”?

In connection with my question about the meaning and currency of “Security mom,” I was drawn to the fact that all the following labels; “Soccer mom,” “Wal-Mart mom,” “Security mom” are combined with ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Part Two: When was “googleable” or “googlable” first used?

Part One Part one is here, and cites references and dates about the verb ‘to google’, and asks about the syllabification and spelling of googl(e)able. Part Two This was originally my second ...
6
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2answers
63 views

Where is “tofu” for “font fallback box glyph” coming from?

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noto_fonts#Origin_of_Noto_name: sometimes there will be characters in the text that can not be displayed, because no font that supports them is available to the ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

An antonym for 'sought-after'

Whenever describing something that is seldom looked for or desired I often verbalise it with "ill sought after" without hesitating. (ignore that ill is its own word, the trouble I'm having writing it ...
5
votes
1answer
169 views

Kingsman vs King's man

When you look up the word kingsman in Wiktionary, its etymology shows that it is compounded with king + s + man in the same way as Klansman (Ku Klux Klan's member), huntsman (a man who hunts) or ...
6
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4answers
383 views

Meaning of “win-the-cycle crap”

In the CBS TV political drama Madam Secretary, Season 1 Episode 17, Secretary of State comes back from Iran after successfully stopping a coup secretly plotted by some Iranian anti-government ...
6
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2answers
155 views

What is the term for finding your own question?

So, I have a technical problem and I Google for an answer. The first result I find is on Stack Exchange, and the person is asking the same question. So I immediately try to like the question... and am ...
7
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4answers
1k views

Is “Englishnization” an acceptable term?

There's a company named Rakuten in Japan, which introduced "Englishnization" a couple of years ago. They adopted an internal policy where all the employees are expected to speak English as an official ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

The Opposite of Truth (in the broad sense of the term; not “lies”)

If you say something that isn't true, you are broadcasting a lie. But I'm searching for a term that can be used in a broader, largely political context. To put it in perspective, we might ask what ...
3
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3answers
212 views

Suggest a collective term for the “shadow people”

In politics, the term controlled opposition describes people who appear to be leaders but who are actually working for the dark side (e.g. corrupt governments or corporate interests). However, there ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

“IoT”: How well understood is this abbreviation, especially when heard, not read? [closed]

How well understood is the abbreviation “IoT” for “Internet of things”? A company has a product, let’s call it the “IoT Refrigerator.” At first glance, I personally had no idea what this “IoT” is. ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Is there a specific word that could be used to describe the leader of a planet?

Mayor is a word that specifically means the leader of a town. Chief means the leader of a tribe. Governor means the leader of a state or province. Words like Emperor or King imply the head of a ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Is “packetize” a word? [closed]

In the RF communications world, firmware takes data and "packetizes" it into frames. Is this really a word?
8
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10answers
597 views

Non-pejorative word/phrase for “social justice warrior”

The term "social justice warrior" appears to have been coined as a pejorative term, and Urban Dictionary defines it thus: A pejorative term for an individual who repeatedly and vehemently ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

How does your orange peel?

Increasingly over the last few years, UK supermarkets and grocers have offered us things called 'Easy Peelers' (also easy-peelers, and in one case I've seen, easypeelers). It's a generic term that ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

Answering a multiple choice question with “yes”

Is there a word and/or neologism that describes the act of answering a multiple choice question with "YES" or "NO" to imply both(none) or either(neither)? Example: Q: Do you like Ice Cream or Frozen ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

Are there any real-world examples of malamanteau?

I know that Randall (from xkcd) invented this word as a joke, but now I'm wondering. Are there any examples of real words that are "A portmanteau created by incorrectly combining a malapropism with ...
3
votes
2answers
905 views

What does 'YouTuber' mean?

The most famous video sharing website YouTube has generated a neologism youtuber. Curiously the term, which has become very popular in recent years, is not yet present in dictionaries apart from few ...
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votes
1answer
53 views

What is a good word for the permission of a complementary state of affairs?

Suppose that it is permitted to do not-p. What would be a good word for characterising p? Would it be reasonable to say that p is "contramitted"? Could we, alternatively, perhaps say that p is ...
16
votes
15answers
24k views

What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?

Not necessarily a virgin, but someone that has consciously chosen to stay single for life (and is content with that decision). Hopefully, there is a single word for it. Example: Ralph Nader UPDATE: ...
4
votes
8answers
2k views

Is there a word for the tangible equivalent of visualization?

The word visualization is often used to describe an image or interactive piece of media that represents a data set. I am trying to think if there is an equivalent for something that is not only ...
7
votes
1answer
89k views

What does “instagram” mean?

I'm talking about the name of the popular internet photograph service. I guess the first part of the word (insta) means instant, but I couldn't figure out what it means when it's colligated with gram. ...
1
vote
0answers
141 views

What is the name of the era for Queen Elizabeth II?

Given the Elizabethan era and the Victorian era, and the duration of Queen Elizabeth II's reign of Great Britain, it seems likely that there will be an era named for her. What is that name? Is there ...
0
votes
0answers
186 views

What does “uber-word” mean?

This question came up at Is "act like a mensch" too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)? Uber-word came up in this exchange: English has always welcomed foreign ...
4
votes
7answers
5k views

Is there a word for the phrase “I don't know what I don't know”?

In my current job, I'm constantly trying to figure out when the next thing I don't know that I don't know is going to bite me in the butt and cause me to have to rework my code. I've been working on ...
2
votes
2answers
181 views

-gate, and gamergate

I have always understood the phrase ____-gate to refer to a controversy or conflict. For example, deflate-gate was the hubbub around whether the Patriots intentionally deflated balls during the AFC ...
10
votes
8answers
2k views

Single word for a self-confessed traveler who constantly talks about his travels regardless of the audience interest, circumstance or relevence?

What would be a good single word for a self-confessed traveler who constantly talks about his travels, rattling off place names ("Oh that one time in Timbaktu....", "Thank you for the coffee! Speaking ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

How to use the word “magistricide”?

I’m having a bit of trouble using the word magistricide in context. I’m leaning towards using the word suicide as reference, but I’m still not sure if it’s correct. So given the model of “a failed ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Where did the word “proc” originate?

The word "proc" is used to describe an event that occurs at various intervals and seems to be a term unique to programming and gaming: When does that event proc? If that trigger procs it will ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Ending a sentence with “because [noun].”

I've noticed an interesting usage where "because [noun]." is used at the end of a sentence to mean "because [...everything that word implies. Nothing more needs to be said]". It often has a wry or ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

Is there a word for people who have shared the same locality?

A "contemporary" is someone who has lived at the same time (more-or-less, anyway) as another person. e.g., Bret Harte (1836-1902) can be said to have been a contemporary of Mark Twain (1835-1910). ...