A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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Can “womenomics” be considered a neologism?

It is not the first time I come cross the term womenomics used to refer to a wider presence of women in the economic activities of a country. In this case it refers to Japan, a country where women ...
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126 views

“heart advice” - jarring or beautiful?

I'm translating a Tibetan text written in verse into English. The style is one of direct advice rather than learned philosophy. My aim is for the translation to have the same down-to-earth quality as ...
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56 views

Neoclassical Neologisms [closed]

Could anybody give me a few interesting examples of neologisms of Latin or Greek origin, or containing affixes from Latin or Greek which are popular nowadays but haven't entered the dictionaries yet? ...
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95 views

-gate, and gamergate

I have always understood the phrase ____-gate to refer to a controversy or conflict. For example, deflate-gate was the hubbub around whether the Patriots intentionally deflated balls during the AFC ...
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82 views

Term for Making a New Word that is the Same Part of Speech as its Root

Recently, I've been noticing that in casual speech people often unwittingly create new words from standard English words that are (a) of the same part of speech as the standard word and (b) meant to ...
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190 views

Is 'againsting' a [new] word?

The wikipedia article on linguistic competence says: Againsting the syntax-centered view of generative grammar(syntactocentrism), he specifically treats phonology, syntax and semantics as ...
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0answers
57 views

How do I invent a word targeted to english speakers? [closed]

I'm looking for rules, guidance, and structure that will allow me to invent a word (or series of words) that would be easy for an English speaker to pronounce and remember. The intent is to generate ...
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2answers
69 views

Sapiosexual without the sexual connotation

I have been hearing the word "sapiosexual" referring to a person attracted to another because of the mental abilities, but attracted not in a sexual way, and I believe "sapiosexual" isn't the most ...
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3answers
1k views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
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97 views

Word or phrase for a scam-like enterprise based on ignorance

I've noticed a spate of schemes to raise money on Kickstarter, Indiegogo and through more traditional avenues that involve claims that are essentially physically impossible. A rudimentary due ...
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2answers
150 views

What's a synonym for a passionate person?

What's a word for a passionate person? Like a "passionista", but that of course already has another meaning. Someone that generally has strong desires, goals, or convictions, and works hard to make ...
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4answers
327 views

What is a verb that means “is possible”?

These phrases have the same meaning: an existing X / X is existing / X exists As do these: a possible X / X is possible / X [sought word] Is there a verb that corresponds to 'exists', but ...
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2answers
96 views

impediment-y what's the meaning of this

The sentence I'm trying to figure out is: Unfortunately, the distance, etc are impediment-y enough for me Is it a typo or a neologism? Edit: a little bit more of context: Unfortunately, the ...
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3answers
184 views

Is there a word for the new date of a postponement?

Is there a word to describe the new date of a postponement? I was in conversation with someone and I said to her: "The show was postponed, and I'm worried I won't be able to make it to the ...
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1answer
512 views

Breaking the set - meaning

Breaking the set What does this expression mean? I hear this expression often used in the context of alternative media reports and debates. Here's the link, right at the beginning the host uses that ...
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1answer
63 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
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1answer
980 views

Proper usage of the term 'hmmmmm' [closed]

In his 2006 book The Singing Neanderthals, the palaeontologist Steve Mithen has developed a theory to suggest that language developed from song, and that the Neanderthals were the first to make that ...
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2answers
66 views

“Memberify” or “membrify”? [closed]

Which is the correct form when adding the -ify suffix to member? memberify membrify I know it's not a regular word, I want to use it in a context for something like "make me a member".
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97 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [closed]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
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82 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
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858 views

What does “blanding” mean?

What does blanding mean in any culture or language?
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1answer
460 views

What does “boo-boo face” mean, and how did it originate? [closed]

What does "boo-boo face" mean? I've found it many times before but can't understand it. Is it a recent expression? What is the etymology of boo-boo face?
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1answer
180 views

Is 'verse' (or a homonym of 'verse') another word for 'versus'?

I have heard a television news figure say what sounds like verse when it seems he means to say versus. Is this an alternate pronunciation, or is it a different word? If it's a different word, what is ...
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1answer
69 views

To B or not 2 B [closed]

I am far from being a doctrinaire stickler opposing all neologisms; Twitter alerts one to the merit of abbreviations like "2" for "too", "4" for "for" etc. But many new usages fail to gain my assent. ...
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1k views

How is a word coined? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? What if I want to use the term supertibi somewhere accompanying superego? We have superego ...
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592 views

Is this a morphological error? or an instance of neologism? [closed]

A learner's error of translation: Hand me the pincers. (for pliers) Is this an error of morphology; or is it, as I think, a neologism, in that the learner substitutes a term he already knows ...