A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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3
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2answers
94 views

Are any senses of the word 'candidate' acceptable for attributive-noun usage?

I've just used 'candidate' attributively to mean '[worth considering as] a real possibility [for the purpose stated, or implied by context] (eg a candidate term or construction). I've not been able ...
3
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1answer
162 views

What kind of morphemes do you call -ish and -y? How would you describe their function?

In the context of neologisms and/or teenspeak: e.g. soon-ish, tumblr-y
3
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1answer
386 views

What are the implicit rules for creating new portmanteaux in English?

Wikipedia defines a portmanteau1 as: “Portmanteau word” is used to describe a linguistic blend, namely “a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their ...
3
votes
1answer
267 views

Is “I like!” a recent idiom? What is its origin?

Does it seem to anyone else that in the past few years people have been saying "I like!" in a new, playful, ungrammatical way? I am not plugged in to popular culture so I wonder if some of you could ...
2
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7answers
12k views

What do you call someone who is obsessed with video games?

I need a slang word which means someone addicted to playing video or computer games. Could gameaholic work? It can't be nerd or geek because although those expressions denote someone who is ...
2
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3answers
257 views

Is Administratium an actual word?

We commonly use this word in office, and the definitions point to its meaning. But is this an actual word? It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary.
2
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5answers
3k views

What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
2
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3answers
661 views

What is the English word for “one who composes prayers”?

I remember meeting a priest from Rome who described himself as a [missing word here] which he defined as one who writes prayers. I cannot for the life of me recall or find this word, and I'm starting ...
2
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2answers
90 views

Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda

We are familiar with addendum (and addenda), which we take directly from Latin to mean "something (or things) added" This is used especially in regard to written work such as books. Today I was ...
2
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3answers
281 views

What terminology is used for English words coined by EFL speakers?

A neologism is a newly coined word. Is there a term for a new English-language word coined by people in another country for whom English is a foreign language? While visiting China a few years ago, ...
2
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3answers
2k views

Is there a better, existing word for “antifragility”?

Nassim Taleb, on a recent episode of Econtalk, talks about his upcoming book that aims to coin the word antifragility. The essential meaning is close to the phrase “What doesn’t kill you makes you ...
2
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3answers
292 views

Better English equivalent for “set of methods”

In the philosophy of science, there are three terms which are used to describe three different related notions. In both Polish (pl) and German (de), these three terms are unique such that there is no ...
2
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4answers
841 views

Is 'she-woman' an acceptable counterpart of 'he-man'?

If this is, as it is, a real English example, I wanted to know what role his women played in persuading him that he was this incredible he-man. can this I wanted to know what role her men ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Is there a word for 'love letter'?

Some types of letters — i.e., messages that you write on a piece of paper and send to someone — have their own name. In fact, for example, we call 'note' a short letter to someone, ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

“IoT”: How well understood is this abbreviation, especially when heard, not read? [closed]

How well understood is the abbreviation “IoT” for “Internet of things”? A company has a product, let’s call it the “IoT Refrigerator.” At first glance, I personally had no idea what this “IoT” is. ...
2
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1answer
101 views

Is there a word for people who have shared the same locality?

A "contemporary" is someone who has lived at the same time (more-or-less, anyway) as another person. e.g., Bret Harte (1836-1902) can be said to have been a contemporary of Mark Twain (1835-1910). ...
2
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2answers
181 views

-gate, and gamergate

I have always understood the phrase ____-gate to refer to a controversy or conflict. For example, deflate-gate was the hubbub around whether the Patriots intentionally deflated balls during the AFC ...
2
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1answer
71 views

Is there a specific word that could be used to describe the leader of a planet?

Mayor is a word that specifically means the leader of a town. Chief means the leader of a tribe. Governor means the leader of a state or province. Words like Emperor or King imply the head of a ...
2
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1answer
574 views

Is 'againsting' a [new] word?

The wikipedia article on linguistic competence says: Againsting the syntax-centered view of generative grammar(syntactocentrism), he specifically treats phonology, syntax and semantics as ...
2
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3answers
98 views

'Communication" as a verb

I've seen the word 'communication' as a verb. Going by the provenance of the document, I'm reasonably sure that the author meant to use it in this context and that it wasn't a typo. E.g.: How ...
2
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2answers
1k views

prefix for “possible”, “supposed”, “potential” etc.?

I am looking for a prefix to express the meaning of something possibly belonging to a class / category, or being a candidate for the concept in question. For instance, a "[...]-solution" would be ...
2
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1answer
46 views

One who loves science

Would I be off base if I suggested (or created) the word "sciophile"? Meaning "one who loves science".
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3answers
698 views

Is there a term for French words adopted by the English language, such as “hors d'oeuvres” or “objet d'art”

I would call them "Frenchisms" or some such -ism, but I figured I'd at least ask first. So is there a name for such adopted foreign phrases? Also, how about those adopted from languages other than ...
1
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3answers
6k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
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3answers
2k views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
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2answers
139 views

What would be an apt technical term for the fear of eating cat food?

If there were a technical term for the condition in which a person is irrationally and intensely afraid of inadvertently eating cat food, what would that term be?
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4answers
320 views

How would you describe an operator which has no fixity? [closed]

Traditionally mathematical operators are either prefix, postfix or infix. All the three forms of notation are equivalent and can be converted from one to another. Formal systems such as programming ...
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2answers
262 views

'Cromulent' Etymology

Given its first use: "I don't know why, it's a perfectly cromulent word." The verb is "is" (=> it's) and the noun is "word". Since cromulent links them both and directly addresses the noun, ...
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1answer
2k views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he ...
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2answers
31 views

Is there a word for this opposite reaction you can have when you meet someone after a long time?

These are the feelings/emotion I would like to describe with a word: You have been really a close friend of another person for many many years, and then you stopped hanging out together and even ...
1
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1answer
247 views

Is there a term for coining a phrase for a word that already exists?

Usually a new term emerges and it becomes necessary to add a qualification to an old word for disambiguation. examples: "mono sound" versus "stereo sound" "analog watch" versus "digital ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
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2answers
104 views

An antonym for 'sought-after'

Whenever describing something that is seldom looked for or desired I often verbalise it with "ill sought after" without hesitating. (ignore that ill is its own word, the trouble I'm having writing it ...
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2answers
90 views

Product name for service that manages connections [closed]

Looking for a word or catchy phrase that captures the meaning of "connection management". I work for a web-based company that manages APIs (API's are the connective tissue of the Internet of Things). ...
1
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1answer
116 views

Term for misused diacritics

Is there a word which describes intentionally misusing or abusing diacritics, in contexts where they are neither needed nor appropriate, for purely stylistic reasons. For example: I submittéd my ...
1
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1answer
56 views

The Opposite of Truth (in the broad sense of the term; not “lies”)

If you say something that isn't true, you are broadcasting a lie. But I'm searching for a term that can be used in a broader, largely political context. To put it in perspective, we might ask what ...
1
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1answer
111 views

Can “womenomics” be considered a neologism?

It is not the first time I come cross the term womenomics used to refer to a wider presence of women in the economic activities of a country. In this case it refers to Japan, a country where women ...
1
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1answer
161 views

“heart advice” - jarring or beautiful?

I'm translating a Tibetan text written in verse into English. The style is one of direct advice rather than learned philosophy. My aim is for the translation to have the same down-to-earth quality as ...
1
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2answers
118 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
1
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1answer
36 views

A political ideology that combines ideas of others to solve problems at hand?

I'm looking for an existing word or neologism to name a political ideology that uses principles and ideas of others. The goal of this ideology is mix and combine approaches in order to best reply to ...
1
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1answer
126 views

Term for Making a New Word that is the Same Part of Speech as its Root

Recently, I've been noticing that in casual speech people often unwittingly create new words from standard English words that are (a) of the same part of speech as the standard word and (b) meant to ...
1
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0answers
97 views

Are there any real-world examples of malamanteau?

I know that Randall (from xkcd) invented this word as a joke, but now I'm wondering. Are there any examples of real words that are "A portmanteau created by incorrectly combining a malapropism with ...
1
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0answers
149 views

What is the name of the era for Queen Elizabeth II?

Given the Elizabethan era and the Victorian era, and the duration of Queen Elizabeth II's reign of Great Britain, it seems likely that there will be an era named for her. What is that name? Is there ...
1
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1answer
163 views

Neoclassical Neologisms [closed]

Could anybody give me a few interesting examples of neologisms of Latin or Greek origin, or containing affixes from Latin or Greek which are popular nowadays but haven't entered the dictionaries yet? ...
1
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3answers
416 views

Sapiosexual without the sexual connotation

I have been hearing the word "sapiosexual" referring to a person attracted to another because of the mental abilities, but attracted not in a sexual way, and I believe "sapiosexual" isn't the most ...
0
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5answers
300 views

It's not 'suicide'. What is it? [closed]

It's not suicide 'Suicide' means suicide, n.1 a. One who dies by his own hand; one who commits self-murder. Also, one who attempts or has a tendency to commit suicide. suicide, n.2 a. The ...
0
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2answers
104 views

Word or phrase for a scam-like enterprise based on ignorance

I've noticed a spate of schemes to raise money on Kickstarter, Indiegogo and through more traditional avenues that involve claims that are essentially physically impossible. A rudimentary due ...
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3answers
3k views

What's a synonym for a passionate person?

What's a word for a passionate person? Like a "passionista", but that of course already has another meaning. Someone that generally has strong desires, goals, or convictions, and works hard to make ...
0
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4answers
879 views

What is a verb that means “is possible”?

These phrases have the same meaning: an existing X / X is existing / X exists As do these: a possible X / X is possible / X [sought word] Is there a verb that corresponds to 'exists', but ...