A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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4answers
218 views

What is a verb that means “is possible”?

These phrases have the same meaning: an existing X / X is existing / X exists As do these: a possible X / X is possible / X [sought word] Is there a verb that corresponds to 'exists', but ...
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2answers
86 views

impediment-y what's the meaning of this

The sentence I'm trying to figure out is: Unfortunately, the distance, etc are impediment-y enough for me Is it a typo or a neologism? Edit: a little bit more of context: Unfortunately, the ...
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3answers
175 views

Is there a word for the new date of a postponement?

Is there a word to describe the new date of a postponement? I was in conversation with someone and I said to her: "The show was postponed, and I'm worried I won't be able to make it to the ...
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1answer
313 views

Breaking the set - meaning

Breaking the set What does this expression mean? I hear this expression often used in the context of alternative media reports and debates. Here's the link, right at the beginning the host uses that ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
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1answer
567 views

Proper usage of the term 'hmmmmm' [closed]

In his 2006 book The Singing Neanderthals, the palaeontologist Steve Mithen has developed a theory to suggest that language developed from song, and that the Neanderthals were the first to make that ...
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2answers
64 views

“Memberify” or “membrify”? [closed]

Which is the correct form when adding the -ify suffix to member? memberify membrify I know it's not a regular word, I want to use it in a context for something like "make me a member".
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1answer
41 views

Are any senses of the word 'candidate' acceptable for attributive-noun usage?

I've just used 'candidate' attributively to mean '[worth considering as] a real possibility [for the purpose stated, or implied by context] (eg a candidate term or construction). I've not been able ...
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1answer
67 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [closed]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
-1
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1answer
76 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
-1
votes
1answer
775 views

What does “blanding” mean?

What does blanding mean in any culture or language?
-1
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1answer
277 views

What does “boo-boo face” mean, and how did it originate? [closed]

What does "boo-boo face" mean? I've found it many times before but can't understand it. Is it a recent expression? What is the etymology of boo-boo face?
-1
votes
1answer
154 views

Is 'verse' (or a homonym of 'verse') another word for 'versus'?

I have heard a television news figure say what sounds like verse when it seems he means to say versus. Is this an alternate pronunciation, or is it a different word? If it's a different word, what is ...
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votes
1answer
66 views

To B or not 2 B [closed]

I am far from being a doctrinaire stickler opposing all neologisms; Twitter alerts one to the merit of abbreviations like "2" for "too", "4" for "for" etc. But many new usages fail to gain my assent. ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

How is a word coined? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? What if I want to use the term supertibi somewhere accompanying superego? We have superego ...
-3
votes
2answers
506 views

Is this a morphological error? or an instance of neologism? [closed]

A learner's error of translation: Hand me the pincers. (for pliers) Is this an error of morphology; or is it, as I think, a neologism, in that the learner substitutes a term he already knows ...