A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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How long have people been swearing in English?

I was looking through my old A-Level English set books from 1989 at the weekend. We had to study the Canterbury Tales and I can still remember our delight when we discovered that 'queynte' was the ...
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10k views

Verbing, or turning nouns into verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is it called when a non-verb is used as a verb? The phenomenon of turning a noun into a verb is very common. Some are more well known, like "shouldering the blame" ...
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How should one pronounce the “rofl” in “roflstomp” or “roflcopter”?

"ROFL" stands for rolling on the floor laughing but has been mushed into other words with their own meanings. Two examples: Ouch, that was a roflstomp. I'm on a roflcopter! While these are ...
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5answers
482 views

Is there a word for the tangible equivalent of visualization?

The word visualization is often used to describe an image or interactive piece of media that represents a data set. I am trying to think if there is an equivalent for something that is not only ...
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2answers
498 views

Are the words 'innuendo' and 'insinuation' different in meaning?

According to the dictionary the two words are synonymous to each other but I think there is a subtle difference in meaning between the two words that I do not find in the dictionary. I thought of ...
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153 views

How to form a word to represent “drawing quote ideas”?

I'm a graphic designer. I have a project at hand in which I want to draw the underlying concepts in famous quotes. I want to name this project, and I thought of something similar to "quote-drawing". ...
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1answer
157 views

“Shakespearean English” - What English or American writers have adjectives coined after their names?

Shake·spear·ean - adjective \shāk-ˈspir-ē-ən: of or relating to William Shakespeare or his writings. Almost every English speaking person has heard or read something about Shakespearean English. ...
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296 views

Has the word “Birtherism” gotten the currency or ‘citizenship’ as the received English?

I found the article titled “Birtherism isn’t dead” in today’s Washington Post. It begins with the following sentence: “Discussion of President Obama’s place of birth died down significantly when he ...
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87 views

A phrase or neologism which describes obsolete technology-related neologisms

Neologisms and slang that are inspired by technology are increasingly commonplace, e.g.: 'Why don't you just google it?' or 'Text me.' Some of these neologisms leave our lexicon as quickly as ...
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667 views

Is there a technical term for the two halves of an email address? [closed]

Is there a technical name for the two halves of an email address? I mean the parts before and after the @ sign. As a kind of example of what I mean, for UK postcodes, I believe the two halves are ...
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1answer
132 views

Origin and usage of “nu-” (e.g. nu-metal)

Not every dictionary I checked has "nu-" but here are a few examples: nu- dictionary.com — indicating an updated or modern version of something: nu-metal music Bing — new: ...
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238 views

Whatever happened to “eyeglasses”, “facial tissues”, and “video game consoles”?

Now-a-days, we tend to ask:"Have you seen my glasses anywhere?" "Do you have any spare tissues to lend me?" and "How many consoles do you own?" It's just quicker to say and any native speaker will ...
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163 views

The Jackass Syndrome

Some years ago, I watched an episode of the show Just Shoot Me! where one of characters used the phrase "The Jackass Syndrome" to describe the situation were two people who are quite similar in some ...
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1answer
177 views

What are the implicit rules for creating new portmanteaux in English?

Wikipedia defines a portmanteau1 as: “Portmanteau word” is used to describe a linguistic blend, namely “a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their ...
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1answer
699 views

Ending a sentence with “because [noun].”

I've noticed an interesting usage where "because [noun]." is used at the end of a sentence to mean "because [...everything that word implies. Nothing more needs to be said]". It often has a wry or ...
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152 views

What is the origin of “dox” and “doxing”?

Wikipedia has a solid description of what "doxing" is: Doxing is the Internet-based practice of researching and publishing personally identifiable information about an individual. They also make ...
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229 views

Is Administratium an actual word?

We commonly use this word in office, and the definitions point to its meaning. But is this an actual word? It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary.
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5answers
3k views

What do you call someone who is obsessed with video games?

A slang word which means someone addicted to playing video or computer games. A gameholic? It can't be nerd or geek because those expressions denote the person may indeed be eccentric, a loner, and ...
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3answers
601 views

What is the English word for “one who composes prayers”?

I remember meeting a priest from Rome who described himself as a [missing word here] which he defined as one who writes prayers. I cannot for the life of me recall or find this word, and I'm starting ...
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3answers
154 views

What terminology is used for English words coined by EFL speakers?

A neologism is a newly coined word. Is there a term for a new English-language word coined by people in another country for whom English is a foreign language? While visiting China a few years ago, ...
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3answers
1k views

Is there a better, existing word for “antifragility”?

Nassim Taleb, on a recent episode of Econtalk, talks about his upcoming book that aims to coin the word antifragility. The essential meaning is close to the phrase “What doesn’t kill you makes you ...
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183 views

Better English equivalent for “set of methods”

In the philosophy of science, there are three terms which are used to describe three different related notions. In both Polish (pl) and German (de), these three terms are unique such that there is no ...
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71 views

Where did the word “proc” originate?

The word "proc" is used to describe an event that occurs at various intervals and seems to be a term unique to programming and gaming: When does that event proc? If that trigger procs it will ...
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4answers
495 views

Is 'she-woman' an acceptable counterpart of 'he-man'?

If this is, as it is, a real English example, I wanted to know what role his women played in persuading him that he was this incredible he-man. can this I wanted to know what role her men ...
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Is there a word for 'love letter'?

Some types of letters — i.e., messages that you write on a piece of paper and send to someone — have their own name. In fact, for example, we call 'note' a short letter to someone, ...
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154 views

difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
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How did 'arching' come into use as a verb meaning 'to thwart'?

I have seen the word 'arch' used as a verb in the context of a villain causing trouble for a hero, or a hero thwarting a villain. It is also used when a villain is actively trying to become a hero's ...
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3answers
50 views

'Communication" as a verb

I've seen the word 'communication' as a verb. Going by the provenance of the document, I'm reasonably sure that the author meant to use it in this context and that it wasn't a typo. E.g.: How ...
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477 views

prefix for “possible”, “supposed”, “potential” etc.?

I am looking for a prefix to express the meaning of something possibly belonging to a class / category, or being a candidate for the concept in question. For instance, a "[...]-solution" would be ...
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2k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
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3answers
454 views

Is there a term for French words adopted by the English language, such as “hors d'oeuvres” or “objet d'art”

I would call them "Frenchisms" or some such -ism, but I figured I'd at least ask first. So is there a name for such adopted foreign phrases? Also, how about those adopted from languages other than ...
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75 views

What would be an apt technical term for the fear of eating cat food?

If there were a technical term for the condition in which a person is irrationally and intensely afraid of inadvertently eating cat food, what would that term be?
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201 views

How would you describe an operator which has no fixity? [closed]

Traditionally mathematical operators are either prefix, postfix or infix. All the three forms of notation are equivalent and can be converted from one to another. Formal systems such as programming ...
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160 views

'Cromulent' Etymology

Given its first use: "I don't know why, it's a perfectly cromulent word." The verb is "is" (=> it's) and the noun is "word". Since cromulent links them both and directly addresses the noun, ...
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523 views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he ...
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577 views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
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1answer
102 views

Term for misused diacritics

Is there a word which describes intentionally misusing or abusing diacritics, in contexts where they are neither needed nor appropriate, for purely stylistic reasons. For example: I submittéd my ...
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1answer
65 views

Can “womenomics” be considered a neologism?

It is not the first time I come cross the term womenomics used to refer to a wider presence of women in the economic activities of a country. In this case it refers to Japan, a country where women ...
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1answer
112 views

“heart advice” - jarring or beautiful?

I'm translating a Tibetan text written in verse into English. The style is one of direct advice rather than learned philosophy. My aim is for the translation to have the same down-to-earth quality as ...
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1answer
40 views

Is 'againsting' a [new] word?

The wikipedia article on linguistic competence says: Againsting the syntax-centered view of generative grammar(syntactocentrism), he specifically treats phonology, syntax and semantics as ...
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829 views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
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82 views

Word or phrase for a scam-like enterprise based on ignorance

I've noticed a spate of schemes to raise money on Kickstarter, Indiegogo and through more traditional avenues that involve claims that are essentially physically impossible. A rudimentary due ...
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4answers
207 views

What is a verb that means “is possible”?

These phrases have the same meaning: an existing X / X is existing / X exists As do these: a possible X / X is possible / X [sought word] Is there a verb that corresponds to 'exists', but ...
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2answers
83 views

impediment-y what's the meaning of this

The sentence I'm trying to figure out is: Unfortunately, the distance, etc are impediment-y enough for me Is it a typo or a neologism? Edit: a little bit more of context: Unfortunately, the ...
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3answers
173 views

Is there a word for the new date of a postponement?

Is there a word to describe the new date of a postponement? I was in conversation with someone and I said to her: "The show was postponed, and I'm worried I won't be able to make it to the ...
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1answer
268 views

Breaking the set - meaning

Breaking the set What does this expression mean? I hear this expression often used in the context of alternative media reports and debates. Here's the link, right at the beginning the host uses that ...
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1answer
59 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
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120 views

Is or “verse” or a homonym of “verse” another word for versus?

I have heard a television news figure say what sounds like verse when it seems he means to say versus. Is this an alternate pronunciation, or is it a different word? If it's a different word, what is ...
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499 views

Proper usage of the term 'hmmmmm' [closed]

In his 2006 book The Singing Neanderthals, the palaeontologist Steve Mithen has developed a theory to suggest that language developed from song, and that the Neanderthals were the first to make that ...
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63 views

“Memberify” or “membrify”? [closed]

Which is the correct form when adding the -ify suffix to member? memberify membrify I know it's not a regular word, I want to use it in a context for something like "make me a member".