A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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Verbing, or turning nouns into verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is it called when a non-verb is used as a verb? The phenomenon of turning a noun into a verb is very common. Some are more well known, like "shouldering the blame" ...
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539 views

Which of these two should be preferred: “sinification” or “sinicization”?

Which of these two options would be considered most elegant / correct? Personally I think Sinicization (or Sinicisation) has a more natural ring to it, but I have seen Sinification used also. Also, ...
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532 views

19th century American English “slang”?

As I was doing a bit of research online I stumbled on this Children's Corner page 311 from the American Farmers' Magazine 1858. And, frankly, there are a lot of words that look totally foreign to me. ...
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450 views

What is a word for “experts' self-serving practice”?

Is there any word to refer to the practice of experts in a given field aiming at maintaining their position as experts, rather than producing anything that could possibly challenge their position? I ...
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Good term for a business partner and competitor?

In our line of work we often work with other companies as partners on some jobs, and then compete against them on other jobs. So they are partners and competitors. Is there a good term for this, ...
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Where did the word “proc” originate?

The word "proc" is used to describe an event that occurs at various intervals and seems to be a term unique to programming and gaming: When does that event proc? If that trigger procs it will ...
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2answers
565 views

What is the best way to convert “tongue-in-cheek” into an adverb?

I was thinking something like "tongue-in-cheekly" but it sounds awkward. Of course, alternatives are welcome, but I couldn't come up with one that conveyed the half-serious playfulness that I ...
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1answer
220 views

Kingsman vs King's man

When you look up the word kingsman in Wiktionary, its etymology shows that it is compounded with king + s + man in the same way as Klansman (Ku Klux Klan's member), huntsman (a man who hunts) or ...
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376 views

Who first used the term “bit rot”?

Wikipedia says: Bit rot, also known as bit decay, data rot, or data decay, is a colloquial computing term used to describe either a gradual decay of storage media or the degradation of a software ...
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745 views

What is the origin of “dox” and “doxing”?

Wikipedia has a solid description of what "doxing" is: Doxing is the Internet-based practice of researching and publishing personally identifiable information about an individual. They also make ...
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626 views

Words Inspired by Television

In 2001, the word "d'oh" was added to the Oxford English Dictionary after years and years of being Homer Simpson's catchphrase on the American TV show The Simpsons. Are there any other words that ...
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659 views

A verb for transforming something into currency

I need a verb that expresses the concept of transforming a raw material into currency, as in this sentence "The bitcoin manufacturing process currenciates digital information." New coinages are fine ...
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Is there a word for the tangible equivalent of visualization?

The word visualization is often used to describe an image or interactive piece of media that represents a data set. I am trying to think if there is an equivalent for something that is not only ...
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Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
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633 views

What should I call someone who has a tendency towards monologues?

What should I call someone who has a tendency towards monologues? Would "monologist" be a logical neologism?
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302 views

Is “An other-other woman (person / thing)” a popular English phrase?

The following paragraph of Maureen Dowd’s article on former CIA chief, David Petraeus’ scandal titled “Reputation, Reputation, Reputation” appearing in November 13 New York Times seems to require ...
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2answers
93 views

Is there a term for the principle governing the efficient spatial arrangement of items within a container?

This question was prompted this morning (and yes, it's silly) when I opened the refrigerator to see (yet again) that someone had placed several short items on the top (tall) shelf, usurping space from ...
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4answers
308 views

Why is it always women and not men in: “Soccer mom,” “Tiger mom,” “Helicopter mom,” “Wal-Mart mom,” and “Security mom”?

In connection with my question about the meaning and currency of “Security mom,” I was drawn to the fact that all the following labels; “Soccer mom,” “Wal-Mart mom,” “Security mom” are combined with ...
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1answer
336 views

“Shakespearean English” - What English or American writers have adjectives coined after their names?

Shake·spear·ean - adjective \shāk-ˈspir-ē-ən: of or relating to William Shakespeare or his writings. Almost every English speaking person has heard or read something about Shakespearean English. ...
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Is there a word for the phrase “I don't know what I don't know”?

In my current job, I'm constantly trying to figure out when the next thing I don't know that I don't know is going to bite me in the butt and cause me to have to rework my code. I've been working on ...
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1answer
103 views

Standalone usage of “tid” from tidbits

Watching an old episode of Home Improvement recently, Eavesdropping Neighbour: I was just hearing some tidbits of your conversation. Tim: Sounds to me like you heard the whole tid. This ...
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Ending a sentence with “because [noun].”

I've noticed an interesting usage where "because [noun]." is used at the end of a sentence to mean "because [...everything that word implies. Nothing more needs to be said]". It often has a wry or ...
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What is the name of this rhetorical device involving the use of One. Word. Sentences. For. Effect

I am trying to find the name for the rather recent, I think, rhetorical device of one-word sentences used for emphasis and effect. For example: Columnist Ruth Marcus, writing for the Washington ...
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What is it called when you coin a different version of a word that already exists?

I was in a college class the other day and someone was struggling to think of the word "invalidate". Much to my amusement, they landed on "devalidify" instead. Is there a word or phrase for such a ...
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Is there a suffix for loathing?

For instance trichomania is a love of hair, and trichophobia is a fear of hair. But what suffix would denote a loathing of hair? Edit: Maybe I'm looking at the wrong end of the word, and I should be ...
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What's a better word to use instead of “nicheification”?

What would be a better word to use than "nicheification"? In the article here, there's one sentence that says Furthermore, when your entire career has been structured around nicheification, ...
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How long have people been swearing in English?

I was looking through my old A-Level English set books from 1989 at the weekend. We had to study the Canterbury Tales and I can still remember our delight when we discovered that 'queynte' was the ...
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What is a “foreign fighter”?

I was inspired to ask this question (on ELL) because of something in a CNN article that didn't sound right to me. Per capita, Belgium has the highest number of foreign fighters in Syria of any ...
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4answers
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How should one pronounce the “rofl” in “roflstomp” or “roflcopter”?

"ROFL" stands for rolling on the floor laughing but has been mushed into other words with their own meanings. Two examples: Ouch, that was a roflstomp. I'm on a roflcopter! While these are ...
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Suggest a collective term for the “shadow people”

In politics, the term controlled opposition describes people who appear to be leaders but who are actually working for the dark side (e.g. corrupt governments or corporate interests). However, there ...
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2answers
525 views

Is “lexophilia” a word?

I've been using the word "lexophilia" for years, but only just realized that it might not actually be in popular use at all. I've even had heated arguments with fellow pedants over the veracity of ...
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4answers
225 views

Word for someone ignorant of, but not expected to be knowledgeable about, something

A discussion arose in our office which brought about remembrance of an old term used by William F. Buckley, Jr. — from his old National Review days — in his "Word of the Day." We can't find the term ...
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Are the words 'innuendo' and 'insinuation' different in meaning?

According to the dictionary the two words are synonymous to each other but I think there is a subtle difference in meaning between the two words that I do not find in the dictionary. I thought of ...
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308 views

How to form a word to represent “drawing quote ideas”?

I'm a graphic designer. I have a project at hand in which I want to draw the underlying concepts in famous quotes. I want to name this project, and I thought of something similar to "quote-drawing". ...
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388 views

Has the word “Birtherism” gotten the currency or ‘citizenship’ as the received English?

I found the article titled “Birtherism isn’t dead” in today’s Washington Post. It begins with the following sentence: “Discussion of President Obama’s place of birth died down significantly when he ...
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A phrase or neologism which describes obsolete technology-related neologisms

Neologisms and slang that are inspired by technology are increasingly commonplace, e.g.: 'Why don't you just google it?' or 'Text me.' Some of these neologisms leave our lexicon as quickly as ...
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What is the English term, when someone provides truthful 'extra' information in support to promote own propaganda?

Though the title asks the main question, I will give an example. Imagine a tabloid, which wants to defame a famous personality, say Abraham Lincoln or Michael Jackson. The writers know that, just ...
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What does 'YouTuber' mean?

The most famous video sharing website YouTube has generated a neologism youtuber. Curiously the term, which has become very popular in recent years, is not yet present in dictionaries apart from few ...
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1answer
286 views

Can some words of constructed languages be neologisms as well? [closed]

Recently I have found that words such as hobbit, quidditch even Khaleesi are used in the everyday language when not referring to the books and films they were invented for in the first place. Can they ...
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477 views

Origin and usage of “nu-” (e.g. nu-metal)

Not every dictionary I checked has "nu-" but here are a few examples: nu- dictionary.com — indicating an updated or modern version of something: nu-metal music Bing — new: ...
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1answer
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Is there a technical term for the two halves of an email address? [closed]

Is there a technical name for the two halves of an email address? I mean the parts before and after the @ sign. As a kind of example of what I mean, for UK postcodes, I believe the two halves are ...
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73 views

What could be a word for this concept?

I asked this question on Stack Worldbuilding: In this world a secret society "farms" people with desired features (personality appearances etc.). They have ectogenesis of course; but they ...
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1answer
50 views

Is there a term for the point in time when a product can begin to use itself?

I know there is the term "dogfooding" and have even found other variations on the phrase "... eat our own dog food": "drinking our own champaign" "eating our own cooking" "ice cream our customers ...
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1answer
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Part Two: When was “googleable” or “googlable” first used?

Part One Part one is here, and cites references and dates about the verb ‘to google’, and asks about the syllabification and spelling of googl(e)able. Part Two This was originally my second ...
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1answer
177 views

Answering a multiple choice question with “yes”

Is there a word and/or neologism that describes the act of answering a multiple choice question with "YES" or "NO" to imply both(none) or either(neither)? Example: Q: Do you like Ice Cream or Frozen ...
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1answer
653 views

difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
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How did 'arching' come into use as a verb meaning 'to thwart'?

I have seen the word 'arch' used as a verb in the context of a villain causing trouble for a hero, or a hero thwarting a villain. It is also used when a villain is actively trying to become a hero's ...
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2answers
282 views

Whatever happened to “eyeglasses”, “facial tissues”, and “video game consoles”?

Now-a-days, we tend to ask:"Have you seen my glasses anywhere?" "Do you have any spare tissues to lend me?" and "How many consoles do you own?" It's just quicker to say and any native speaker will ...
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1answer
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The Jackass Syndrome

Some years ago, I watched an episode of the show Just Shoot Me! where one of characters used the phrase "The Jackass Syndrome" to describe the situation were two people who are quite similar in some ...
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1answer
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How does your orange peel?

Increasingly over the last few years, UK supermarkets and grocers have offered us things called 'Easy Peelers' (also easy-peelers, and in one case I've seen, easypeelers). It's a generic term that ...