A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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3
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1answer
731 views

Ending a sentence with “because [noun].”

I've noticed an interesting usage where "because [noun]." is used at the end of a sentence to mean "because [...everything that word implies. Nothing more needs to be said]". It often has a wry or ...
7
votes
5answers
34k views

“Hot mess” meaning and etymology

A phrase has started to be used somewhat frequently over the past few years: "hot mess". I have heard it in professional journalism (albeit, admittedly, mostly entertainment and/or gossip ...
8
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2answers
522 views

Have any pseudo-anglicisms become proper English words?

There are plenty of pseudo-anglicisms in other languages around the world: Handy, Pullunder, Showmaster and Beamer¹ in German. These words, though borrowed from English, are used differently from ...
1
vote
4answers
215 views

How would you describe an operator which has no fixity? [closed]

Traditionally mathematical operators are either prefix, postfix or infix. All the three forms of notation are equivalent and can be converted from one to another. Formal systems such as programming ...
0
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3answers
175 views

Is there a word for the new date of a postponement?

Is there a word to describe the new date of a postponement? I was in conversation with someone and I said to her: "The show was postponed, and I'm worried I won't be able to make it to the ...
1
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2answers
164 views

'Cromulent' Etymology

Given its first use: "I don't know why, it's a perfectly cromulent word." The verb is "is" (=> it's) and the noun is "word". Since cromulent links them both and directly addresses the noun, ...
3
votes
5answers
543 views

Is there a word for the tangible equivalent of visualization?

The word visualization is often used to describe an image or interactive piece of media that represents a data set. I am trying to think if there is an equivalent for something that is not only ...
-3
votes
2answers
509 views

Is this a morphological error? or an instance of neologism? [closed]

A learner's error of translation: Hand me the pincers. (for pliers) Is this an error of morphology; or is it, as I think, a neologism, in that the learner substitutes a term he already knows ...
5
votes
3answers
489 views

Good term for a business partner and competitor?

In our line of work we often work with other companies as partners on some jobs, and then compete against them on other jobs. So they are partners and competitors. Is there a good term for this, ...
2
votes
3answers
185 views

Better English equivalent for “set of methods”

In the philosophy of science, there are three terms which are used to describe three different related notions. In both Polish (pl) and German (de), these three terms are unique such that there is no ...
4
votes
3answers
277 views

Is “An other-other woman (person / thing)” a popular English phrase?

The following paragraph of Maureen Dowd’s article on former CIA chief, David Petraeus’ scandal titled “Reputation, Reputation, Reputation” appearing in November 13 New York Times seems to require ...
1
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2answers
611 views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
-1
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1answer
76 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
0
votes
4answers
4k views

What do you call someone who uses Twitter? [closed]

Are they a twitterer Twitterer Twitter user tweeter tweep? Is it just a matter of preference? For comparison, I think "Facebook user" is the accepted term.
6
votes
4answers
994 views

Is “Englishnization” an acceptable term?

There's a company named Rakuten in Japan, which introduced "Englishnization" a couple of years ago. They adopted an internal policy where all the employees are expected to speak English as an official ...
10
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9answers
1k views

Compressed vs. zipped

Is it correct English to use the term zipped instead of compressed when dealing with computer files? Is it a neologism that is widely accepted as part of modern English?
8
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4answers
3k views

Should proper nouns used as verbs be capitalized?

When a proper noun like "Skype" is used as a verb ("Skyping"), should it be capitalized? My thinking is that it should be capitalized because the root is a proper noun. Does anyone know of a rule ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
7
votes
4answers
586 views

Exact adjective of “conundrum”

I am about to coin the word 'conundrous' because I needed it (and I think it deserves a place in the dictionary)! I would like comments on what you think about that (in the context of a serious ...
3
votes
1answer
297 views

Has the word “Birtherism” gotten the currency or ‘citizenship’ as the received English?

I found the article titled “Birtherism isn’t dead” in today’s Washington Post. It begins with the following sentence: “Discussion of President Obama’s place of birth died down significantly when he ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

“Memberify” or “membrify”? [closed]

Which is the correct form when adding the -ify suffix to member? memberify membrify I know it's not a regular word, I want to use it in a context for something like "make me a member".
3
votes
6answers
614 views

What's a better word to use instead of “nicheification”?

What would be a better word to use than "nicheification"? In the article here, there's one sentence that says Furthermore, when your entire career has been structured around nicheification, ...
3
votes
7answers
2k views

Is there a suffix for loathing?

For instance trichomania is a love of hair, and trichophobia is a fear of hair. But what suffix would denote a loathing of hair? Edit: Maybe I'm looking at the wrong end of the word, and I should be ...
3
votes
1answer
700 views

Is there a technical term for the two halves of an email address? [closed]

Is there a technical name for the two halves of an email address? I mean the parts before and after the @ sign. As a kind of example of what I mean, for UK postcodes, I believe the two halves are ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a word akin to “hungry” or “thirsty” that implies a need to urinate?

Sometimes my brain (maybe because I'm not a native English speaker) tends to come up with logical extensions to common formats; in this case, more than once I caught myself thinking (not out loud, ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Is there a better, existing word for “antifragility”?

Nassim Taleb, on a recent episode of Econtalk, talks about his upcoming book that aims to coin the word antifragility. The essential meaning is close to the phrase “What doesn’t kill you makes you ...
7
votes
5answers
226 views

Term shorter than “microblog” as generic equivalent of “tweet”

I search rather than Google and vacuum rather than Hoover. Technically I microblog rather than tweet, but it just doesn't sound as snappy. Is there a short (single syllable?), established, generic ...
5
votes
2answers
428 views

What is the best way to convert “tongue-in-cheek” into an adverb?

I was thinking something like "tongue-in-cheekly" but it sounds awkward. Of course, alternatives are welcome, but I couldn't come up with one that conveyed the half-serious playfulness that I ...
6
votes
1answer
55k views

What does “instagram” mean?

I'm talking about the name of the popular internet photograph service. I guess the first part of the word (insta) means instant, but I couldn't figure out what it means when it's colligated with gram. ...
3
votes
1answer
165 views

The Jackass Syndrome

Some years ago, I watched an episode of the show Just Shoot Me! where one of characters used the phrase "The Jackass Syndrome" to describe the situation were two people who are quite similar in some ...
6
votes
3answers
204 views

Is ‘12ers’ well-established alias for 2012 Presidential candidate?

I puzzled over the first line of the article of December 9’s Time magazine titled "Des Moines Dust-Up", which reads; '12ers (minus Huntsman) square-off at Drake University for ABC News/Yahoo! ...
9
votes
4answers
991 views

Why is stainless steel “stainless”?

Inox steel is stainless because it does not stain, but is stain the same thing as rust? I just want to understand since stain reminds me of clothing stains, for instance, and I am rather curious as to ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Correct capitalization of words beginning with “e-”

What is the correct capitalization of words beginning with "e-" (like e-mail or e-learning or e-assessment) when used in a title? Is it "E-Learning" or "E-learning" or even "e-Learning"? To clarify: ...
5
votes
4answers
325 views

Does the sentence, “Lots of twilhearts went to the movie” make sense? If it does, what does it mean?

I’ve been making dictation of English news broadcasting for a couple of years in order to maintain listening proficiency of English. On yesterday's AP radio news broadcasted through AFN Tokyo (Eagle ...
19
votes
5answers
2k views

“Bride” is to “bridal” as “groom” is to …?

Instead of taking a bridal portrait, my niece and her fiancé had photos taken together which she insisted on calling groomals. While I guess this term is the accepted name for this new trend, I ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

Standalone usage of “tid” from tidbits

Watching an old episode of Home Improvement recently, Eavesdropping Neighbour: I was just hearing some tidbits of your conversation. Tim: Sounds to me like you heard the whole tid. This ...
5
votes
1answer
313 views

Who first used the term “bit rot”?

Wikipedia says: Bit rot, also known as bit decay, data rot, or data decay, is a colloquial computing term used to describe either a gradual decay of storage media or the degradation of a software ...
4
votes
3answers
716 views

Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
3
votes
2answers
2k views

How long have people been swearing in English?

I was looking through my old A-Level English set books from 1989 at the weekend. We had to study the Canterbury Tales and I can still remember our delight when we discovered that 'queynte' was the ...
10
votes
1answer
541 views

Is “Hissable” a well-received English word?

I posted a question about the receptivity of the word, “non-view” in “views and non-view” a few days ago. One answerer responded me that though “non-view” is not registered in any (or most) of ...
3
votes
2answers
11k views

Verbing, or turning nouns into verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is it called when a non-verb is used as a verb? The phenomenon of turning a noun into a verb is very common. Some are more well known, like "shouldering the blame" ...
25
votes
3answers
4k views

Is there a reason to use “mono” over “uni”?

I'm just interested in knowing if there is any non-arbitrary basis for using prefixes "mono" or "uni" when words are initially being coined. As far as I can tell, they mean the same thing as a prefix. ...
7
votes
5answers
9k views

Is the word “representativity” possible?

I found natural to use the word "representativity" (with regard to a sample population of a survey), but my dictionary does not agree with me. Is "representativity" a valid construction?
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votes
1answer
1k views

How is a word coined? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? What if I want to use the term supertibi somewhere accompanying superego? We have superego ...
5
votes
6answers
399 views

What is a word for “experts' self-serving practice”?

Is there any word to refer to the practice of experts in a given field aiming at maintaining their position as experts, rather than producing anything that could possibly challenge their position? I ...
15
votes
15answers
11k views

What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?

Not necessarily a virgin, but someone that has consciously chosen to stay single for life (and is content with that decision). Hopefully, there is a single word for it. Example: Ralph Nader UPDATE: ...
6
votes
12answers
2k views

What would you call the object of an activity one does for fun?

For instance, the object related to cooking is a "dish", when playing it is "sport" or "game", when singing it's a "song". Which single term would describe the object for the general act of doing ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Should it be an “unlike” or “dislike” button on Facebook?

I see an increasing demand for an unlike button on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Unlike-Button/72641866357 Facebook Adds An Unlike Button For Pages May 7, 2010 Facebook "Unlike" ...
5
votes
3answers
436 views

Which of these two should be preferred: “sinification” or “sinicization”?

Which of these two options would be considered most elegant / correct? Personally I think Sinicization (or Sinicisation) has a more natural ring to it, but I have seen Sinification used also. Also, ...
9
votes
3answers
786 views

When does a neologism cease to be a neologism?

What benchmarks or useful signs can be found to declassify neologisms? Obviously, inclusion in a dictionary is as likely as anything to declare a neologism a word but what happens just before that ...