A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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What word denotes a belief that apparently inanimate objects actually express a malicious, autonomous will?

I came across this word a few years ago, but can't find it now. I do not mean deodand, animism, pathetic fallacy, scapegoating, anthropomorphism, or personification (Word for attaching blame to ...
31
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4answers
896 views

When did the term “scientist” overtake usage of the term “natural philosopher”?

The word scientist comes from the Latin scientia, but when did its usage become more prevalent than the term natural philosopher?
25
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3answers
3k views

Is there a reason to use “mono” over “uni”?

I'm just interested in knowing if there is any non-arbitrary basis for using prefixes "mono" or "uni" when words are initially being coined. As far as I can tell, they mean the same thing as a prefix. ...
20
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4answers
36k views

Is there a more common phrase that means “preponed”?

I was aware of this and this stackexchange post discuss the same. There is no prepone in English. Ok, then how do I say Our meeting is preponed in correct way? What is the correct word/phrase for ...
19
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5answers
1k views

“Bride” is to “bridal” as “groom” is to …?

Instead of taking a bridal portrait, my niece and her fiancé had photos taken together which she insisted on calling groomals. While I guess this term is the accepted name for this new trend, I ...
15
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15answers
9k views

What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?

Not necessarily a virgin, but someone that has consciously chosen to stay single for life (and is content with that decision). Hopefully, there is a single word for it. Example: Ralph Nader UPDATE: ...
15
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2answers
802 views

If I invent a word, what language is it?

I invented a word using medical terminology, Latin and maybe a bit of Greek. (I'm not honestly sure of the etymology of all the morphemes.) Considering that this word is primarily not of English ...
14
votes
1answer
263 views

What is a new coinage to describe the style of articles that starts with number such as “7 Things happy people choose to do every single day."?

I saw a new compound word of something that related with “number” and “article” that describes the style of articles that start with number such as "7 Things happy people choose to do every single ...
11
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9answers
1k views

What do you call a person who refuses the love of another?

In terms of courtly love, you have: The lover (person in love) The beloved (object of the lover's affection) The courtier (the pursuer of the beloved; alt. term for a lover) The lover or courtier ...
10
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9answers
1k views

Compressed vs. zipped

Is it correct English to use the term zipped instead of compressed when dealing with computer files? Is it a neologism that is widely accepted as part of modern English?
10
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3answers
1k views

Origin of “idiocracy”

Did the word "idiocracy" exist prior to the release of the movie of the same title, or is it a neologism coined by its screenwriters?
10
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1answer
508 views

Is “Hissable” a well-received English word?

I posted a question about the receptivity of the word, “non-view” in “views and non-view” a few days ago. One answerer responded me that though “non-view” is not registered in any (or most) of ...
9
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3answers
745 views

When does a neologism cease to be a neologism?

What benchmarks or useful signs can be found to declassify neologisms? Obviously, inclusion in a dictionary is as likely as anything to declare a neologism a word but what happens just before that ...
8
votes
2answers
389 views

Is “tweet” a proper verb now?

So I know that in modern English, the word "google" is considered a proper verb now. Can the same be said for the word "tweet" (i.e. to post a 140-char message to Twitter)?
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Should proper nouns used as verbs be capitalized?

When a proper noun like "Skype" is used as a verb ("Skyping"), should it be capitalized? My thinking is that it should be capitalized because the root is a proper noun. Does anyone know of a rule ...
8
votes
2answers
442 views

Have any pseudo-anglicisms become proper English words?

There are plenty of pseudo-anglicisms in other languages around the world: Handy, Pullunder, Showmaster and Beamer¹ in German. These words, though borrowed from English, are used differently from ...
7
votes
5answers
8k views

Is the word “representativity” possible?

I found natural to use the word "representativity" (with regard to a sample population of a survey), but my dictionary does not agree with me. Is "representativity" a valid construction?
7
votes
5answers
214 views

Term shorter than “microblog” as generic equivalent of “tweet”

I search rather than Google and vacuum rather than Hoover. Technically I microblog rather than tweet, but it just doesn't sound as snappy. Is there a short (single syllable?), established, generic ...
7
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3answers
2k views

Are there any cases where “prepend” cannot be replaced by “prefix”?

"Prepend" is seeing a fair amount of use, both in programmer jargon and elsewhere. Its use seems to come from a desire to create a word that is a direct parallel to "append." However, such a word ...
7
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4answers
483 views

Exact adjective of “conundrum”

I am about to coin the word 'conundrous' because I needed it (and I think it deserves a place in the dictionary)! I would like comments on what you think about that (in the context of a serious ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a word akin to “hungry” or “thirsty” that implies a need to urinate?

Sometimes my brain (maybe because I'm not a native English speaker) tends to come up with logical extensions to common formats; in this case, more than once I caught myself thinking (not out loud, ...
7
votes
5answers
26k views

“Hot mess” meaning and etymology

A phrase has started to be used somewhat frequently over the past few years: "hot mess". I have heard it in professional journalism (albeit, admittedly, mostly entertainment and/or gossip ...
7
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3answers
649 views

What part-of-speech will the new “because” be?

The American Dialect Society has voted because as the Word of the Year owing to its increased use in phrases such as "because happy," "because sad," and "because bored." Since it takes an object, it ...
6
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4answers
935 views

Is “Englishnization” an acceptable term?

There's a company named Rakuten in Japan, which introduced "Englishnization" a couple of years ago. They adopted an internal policy where all the employees are expected to speak English as an official ...
6
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12answers
1k views

What would you call the object of an activity one does for fun?

For instance, the object related to cooking is a "dish", when playing it is "sport" or "game", when singing it's a "song". Which single term would describe the object for the general act of doing ...
6
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4answers
2k views

Pronunciation of “Wiki”

We were discussing the merits of buying a team collaboration tool (Confluence) today, when we were completely sidetracked by the pronouncation "wiki". Most of the folks on the team say it's ...
6
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3answers
203 views

Is ‘12ers’ well-established alias for 2012 Presidential candidate?

I puzzled over the first line of the article of December 9’s Time magazine titled "Des Moines Dust-Up", which reads; '12ers (minus Huntsman) square-off at Drake University for ABC News/Yahoo! ...
5
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4answers
315 views

Does the sentence, “Lots of twilhearts went to the movie” make sense? If it does, what does it mean?

I’ve been making dictation of English news broadcasting for a couple of years in order to maintain listening proficiency of English. On yesterday's AP radio news broadcasted through AFN Tokyo (Eagle ...
5
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3answers
406 views

Which of these two should be preferred: “sinification” or “sinicization”?

Which of these two options would be considered most elegant / correct? Personally I think Sinicization (or Sinicisation) has a more natural ring to it, but I have seen Sinification used also. Also, ...
5
votes
6answers
393 views

What is a word for “experts' self-serving practice”?

Is there any word to refer to the practice of experts in a given field aiming at maintaining their position as experts, rather than producing anything that could possibly challenge their position? I ...
5
votes
3answers
320 views

Good term for a business partner and competitor?

In our line of work we often work with other companies as partners on some jobs, and then compete against them on other jobs. So they are partners and competitors. Is there a good term for this, ...
5
votes
1answer
47k views

What does “instagram” mean?

I'm talking about the name of the popular internet photograph service. I guess the first part of the word (insta) means instant, but I couldn't figure out what it means when it's colligated with gram. ...
5
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2answers
400 views

What is the best way to convert “tongue-in-cheek” into an adverb?

I was thinking something like "tongue-in-cheekly" but it sounds awkward. Of course, alternatives are welcome, but I couldn't come up with one that conveyed the half-serious playfulness that I ...
5
votes
1answer
308 views

Who first used the term “bit rot”?

Wikipedia says: Bit rot, also known as bit decay, data rot, or data decay, is a colloquial computing term used to describe either a gradual decay of storage media or the degradation of a software ...
4
votes
8answers
2k views

What is the opposite of an Epiphany?

I think of an Epiphany as a "Eureka Moment" as in a goldminer crying out, "Eureka!" upon discovering a vein of gold (I'm a native Californian (and former resident of Eureka), so that example comes ...
4
votes
6answers
375 views

Words Inspired by Television

In 2001, the word "d'oh" was added to the Oxford English Dictionary after years and years of being Homer Simpson's catchphrase on the American TV show The Simpsons. Are there any other words that ...
4
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6answers
1k views

How to pronounce and orally spell <3?

It's now an entry in OED, I hear. Anybody know what the actual OED entry says?
4
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3answers
367 views

A verb for transforming something into currency

I need a verb that expresses the concept of transforming a raw material into currency, as in this sentence "The bitcoin manufacturing process currenciates digital information." New coinages are fine ...
4
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4answers
424 views

What should I call someone who has a tendency towards monologues?

What should I call someone who has a tendency towards monologues? Would "monologist" be a logical neologism?
4
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3answers
268 views

Is “An other-other woman (person / thing)” a popular English phrase?

The following paragraph of Maureen Dowd’s article on former CIA chief, David Petraeus’ scandal titled “Reputation, Reputation, Reputation” appearing in November 13 New York Times seems to require ...
4
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2answers
83 views

Is there a term for the principle governing the efficient spatial arrangement of items within a container?

This question was prompted this morning (and yes, it's silly) when I opened the refrigerator to see (yet again) that someone had placed several short items on the top (tall) shelf, usurping space from ...
4
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6answers
1k views

Is there a word for the phrase “I don't know what I don't know”?

In my current job, I'm constantly trying to figure out when the next thing I don't know that I don't know is going to bite me in the butt and cause me to have to rework my code. I've been working on ...
4
votes
1answer
97 views

Standalone usage of “tid” from tidbits

Watching an old episode of Home Improvement recently, Eavesdropping Neighbour: I was just hearing some tidbits of your conversation. Tim: Sounds to me like you heard the whole tid. This ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Correct capitalization of words beginning with “e-”

What is the correct capitalization of words beginning with "e-" (like e-mail or e-learning or e-assessment) when used in a title? Is it "E-Learning" or "E-learning" or even "e-Learning"? To clarify: ...
4
votes
2answers
151 views

Is “I like!” a recent idiom? What is its origin?

Does it seem to anyone else that in the past few years people have been saying "I like!" in a new, playful, ungrammatical way? I am not plugged in to popular culture so I wonder if some of you could ...
3
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7answers
2k views

Is there a suffix for loathing?

For instance trichomania is a love of hair, and trichophobia is a fear of hair. But what suffix would denote a loathing of hair? Edit: Maybe I'm looking at the wrong end of the word, and I should be ...
3
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6answers
549 views

What's a better word to use instead of “nicheification”?

What would be a better word to use than "nicheification"? In the article here, there's one sentence that says Furthermore, when your entire career has been structured around nicheification, ...
3
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2answers
1k views

What is the story behind the word “hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia”?

Was someone just trying to be funny by being ironic?
3
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5answers
1k views

What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
3
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2answers
2k views

How long have people been swearing in English?

I was looking through my old A-Level English set books from 1989 at the weekend. We had to study the Canterbury Tales and I can still remember our delight when we discovered that 'queynte' was the ...