Negation is the process that turns an affirmative statement (e.g. "I am American") into its opposite denial (e.g. "I am not American").

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

0
votes
3answers
375 views

“Yet” to imply negative?

Yet few colleges and universities have taken sufficient account... Does the sentence above imply a negative/opposite meaning? e.g: Few colleges and universities haven't taken sufficient ...
0
votes
1answer
324 views

Please provide me correct interpretation of this sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does negation affect the use and understanding of “or” and “and” A's girlfriend doesn't like movies or Roses. What would be the correct ...
4
votes
4answers
747 views

Why “no” rather than “not” in “Life is no Nintendo game”? [closed]

I've just seen this sentence on the internet... You don't get another chance. Life is no Nintendo game. If I had to say something like that, I would say "Life is not a Nintendo game." Why did ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Does “there is doubt whether it will not …” confuse the meaning of this sentence?

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in an article titled “FROM SOUTH CAROLINA.; PUBLIC FEELING IN CHARLESTON THE LEADING MEN IN THE SECESSION MOVEMENT MISGIVINGS ABOUT THE ...
3
votes
2answers
729 views

Is this correct: “Of [something] I have but none”?

This might be a pretty weird question, given that I'm using awkward grammar. Take into account that I'm trying to play with the language. The question is, would the following be correct? Of milk ...
4
votes
1answer
283 views

Intentional double negation

Is there a name for this manner of purposely speaking in double negatives, e.g. I wouldn't say no to a cup of tea! I've noticed it as a habit of some people, perhaps often going along with a ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it not that big a deal vs No big deal

I was just checking an advanced grammar and learned that the following is possible: It is not that big a deal 1) The book says I cannot skip the article. But how come in "ordinary" version there ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“Cannot help but think” vs. “cannot but think” vs. “cannot help thinking”

Which of the following are grammatical? I cannot help but think. I cannot but think. I cannot help thinking. I was taught (1) is not correct. Is it true? Or are they all correct? ...
3
votes
4answers
381 views

Can you negate a positive without implying the opposite?

I often stumble over the fact that in English, apparently, we imply the reverse when we negate a positive. For example, That wasn't very good. [⇒ That was bad.] That wasn't bad. [⇒ That was ...
3
votes
1answer
14k views

“There is no problem” or “there isn't any problem” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “There is no point in” or “There is not a point in” What's the difference between there is no problem and there isn't any problem? Are they both ...
7
votes
3answers
4k views

Difference between “I haven't” and “I've not” etc

If I have three consecutive words where each adjacent pair can be contracted, e.g. "I would have" or "You are not", is there a difference between the two possible contractions, e.g. "I would've" or ...
3
votes
5answers
8k views

“There isn't” vs. “there's not”

They both expand to "there is not" but for some reason "There's not" sounds indescribably uncomfortable for most situations. Can anyone elucidate why this might be? Or am I wrong? EDIT: Let me ...
5
votes
3answers
363 views

On the expression “no [noun 1] or any [noun 2]”

I have often seen the following expressions: [ex.] 1. I have no allergies or any medical issues. 2. John serves a chicken with no sauce or any kind of seasoning. I suspect that such a use is ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Tag Questions “is he not”

"He is happy, isn't he?" If you did not use the contraction isn't he, in the question above, would the correct sentence be: "He is happy, is he not?" "He is happy, is not he?" Sentence #1 seems ...
1
vote
3answers
504 views

'I don't like fish.' 'Me, too.' Is this natural? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “me, too” be used to reply to a negative statement? 'I don't like fish.' 'Me, too.' Is this sentence natural or unnatural? I mean not the grammatical ...
4
votes
4answers
911 views

Can “me, too” be used to reply to a negative statement?

A: I can't understand why my parents keep me from buying fast food. B: Me, too. It's delicious. Does B's answer sound natural? In Korea, we usually teach that we should use 'me, neither' in ...
4
votes
5answers
276 views

Negative in a question with various negative valence words

so I was walking to a very nice place in Berlin today only to find it empty yet again. I was asking myself why this is... and now I am confused. Which of the following forms of asking are correct? ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “does not seem to” and “seems not to”?

Consider the following sentences: Try not to be alarmed if a rule doesn’t seem to work for a specific sentence. Try not to be alarmed if a rule seems not to work for a specific sentence. ...
1
vote
2answers
295 views

What is the proper way to punctuate “but no”?

I'm trying to figure out the proper usage and punctuation of "but no". I think it's one of the following: You figure I would have made at least one post about Arthur C. Clarke’s “2010” during ...
0
votes
4answers
751 views

Which of these sentences use proper grammar?

Unfortunately, there currently is not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, there is currently not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Question tags — “did you” vs. “didn't you”

Typically, when we ask for confirmation/denial of a statement, we say something like the following: We turn left here, don't we? You have a cat, don't you? We've met before, haven't we? ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

When to use 'no good'; when to use 'not good'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between “no” and “not”? there is a question always confusing me. Is it 'no good' or 'not good'? How do I use them? I guess ...
2
votes
2answers
9k views

What is the difference between “no” and “not”? [closed]

What is the difference between "no" and "not"? We know that "no" and "not" have the same meaning. I'm studying English. I hope to get help. Sorry for my language.
3
votes
4answers
366 views

What's the negative of the nonstandard perfect: “He done eat his breakfast”

In movies I hear a lot of sentences like that in the title of the question spoken mainly by African Americans. As I understand it's the dialect version of the standard Present Perfect. I was wondering ...
1
vote
2answers
572 views

Does “not that you would know” make sense in English?

Today I was teasing a colleague of mine who keeps forgetting things. I said "You forgot because it's Friday today... Well, not that you would not forget any other day". I am not sure if it was ...
6
votes
6answers
704 views

What's the “opposite” of “any more”?

Consider the following sentence: [This] is not important for the younger generation any more. Now let's suppose that for some reason I am willing or obliged to use the adjective "unimportant" ...
7
votes
5answers
391 views

“Why can't I see?” or “Why I can't see?”?

Which of the following is correct? Why can't I see? Why I can't see? I am a bit confused, since both have inversion, negation and a "why" in the beginning.
8
votes
1answer
606 views

Is “It won't let me not.” grammatically correct?

I found myself saying the following sentence the other day: I always fasten my seat belt because my car won't let me not — it starts beeping loudly. If I were to use allow instead of let, I ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

'To' vs 'in order to' in negative clauses

The answers to this related question suggest that to and in order to are pretty much interchangeable, the former being preferred in informal contexts. My question is about negative clauses. ...
4
votes
4answers
791 views

What exactly does “All Items Not On Sale” mean?

Here's a quote from Bill Bryson's "The Mother Tongue": Imagine being a foreigner and having to learn ... , that a sign in the store saying ALL ITEMS NOT ON SALE doesn't mean literally what it ...
3
votes
2answers
609 views

“Does not make changes” or “makes no changes”

I was thinking of using this sentence on my computer program: This action does not make changes on user's machine. Just to be sure, I checked Google Translate which suggested: This action ...
2
votes
3answers
7k views

“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“There is no point in” or “There is not a point in”

I was thinking about these negations. Do these mean the same thing? There is no point in ... There is not a point in ... or: I have no clue I do not have any clue etc.
2
votes
3answers
2k views

The word “but” used as negation

I would like to know the grammatical term for using the word but in the following context: John speaks loudly, but he's a nice guy. The word but is used to signify a negation, to create ...
2
votes
2answers
220 views

“I have nothing” vs “I give nothing” [closed]

Today I was told that "I give nothing to..." cannot be used as "nothing" does not exist and so I cannot give it. But don't you often say "I have nothing to do"? How come that in this case it works, ...
5
votes
1answer
680 views

“I give nothing to no-one” or “I do not give anything to anyone”

I have a bit of an issue with negations. Are the following correct? I do not give anything to anyone //I guess this is correct I give nothing to no-one //can I say that? Generally, is it the same ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Seems to be not X” vs. “seems to not be X”

Which one of these two sentences is written correctly? This test data seems to be not good. This test data seems to not be good. Better yet if you could explain as to why the correct ...
5
votes
2answers
8k views

“I don't think so” vs. “I think not”

I've recently been told that "I don't think so" is, in the U.S.A., a southernism, whereas "I think not" is considered more acceptable everywhere else. Is this true? Example: Q: Is your wrist ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Difference between “unlikeable” and “dislikeable”?

Is there a difference between unlikeable and dislikeable? It feels like there is, but I'm uncertain how to explain it.
8
votes
3answers
12k views

What is the opposite of “enroll”?

Deenroll? Unenroll? I understand words like cancel and resign would work, but is there an appropriate antonym with "enroll" in it?
5
votes
2answers
817 views

How do “need” and “not” mix and match?

You don't need to play You need to not play You need not play You needn't play You need not to play What does each of these mean, and which ones are equivalent to the others? Is the meaning of the ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

What's the distinction between “nonessential” and “inessential”?

I'm revising a text that uses the word "nonessential", but my ear is telling me "inessential." Usually when there are two very similar words like this, there is some subtle (or not so subtle) ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Negative of “shall” [closed]

I really wonder if there is a negative of shall. I've heard something like shan't. For example I shan't or Shall we go to the cinema? No, I shan't. I don't know whether this usage is correct or not.
4
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the meaning of “ought not”?

Consider this example: A few strong branches over water reach for what they ought not reach. Which of the meanings comes closest to “ought not” in this sentence? Is it “doesn't have to”, “should ...
3
votes
3answers
579 views

Adjective describing possession by someone else

Is there any adjective in English that would describe a quality of belonging or being in the possession of someone else who is not the speaker? In short, what adjective would you substitute for the ...
9
votes
1answer
4k views

Negative questions vs positive questions

I'd like to know if negative questions are used very often in English. For example, in Spanish, negative questions are used very often just to offer something, to ask about something you're not sure, ...
1
vote
0answers
356 views

“My love don't cost a thing” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much” In the Jennifer Lopez song "My Love Don't Cost a Thing" she says: My love don't cost a thing ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Using “any” with positive sentence [closed]

Everyone can do it. Nobody can do it. The both sentences are very clear. I understand what they mean. Anyone can do it But I feel a little confused about this sentence. What does it mean? ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

“The service is temporarily unavailable” vs. “…not available”

Is there a difference? Both versions are common. If there is a difference, which do I use when, and why?
0
votes
1answer
836 views

Rules for 'no' and 'not' [closed]

Can anyone elucidate a comprehensive list of rules regarding the usage of 'no' and 'not'? I've found rules of thumb, such as 'no' for nouns and 'not' for everything else, but then there's the case of ...