4
votes
1answer
272 views

Comparing negatives: “she seems not to know” vs. “she doesn't seem to know”

What is the difference in style and meaning between the following two: She seems not to know. She doesn't seem to know. Is there a name to this type of construction?
1
vote
0answers
232 views

Why does a negative adverbial phrase trigger inversion? [duplicate]

When a negative adverb (or adverbial phrase) is placed at the beginning of a sentence, we exchange the normal placement of subject and verb. Why is that?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”

Which is the correct way of saying this in English? I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. If both are correct, which is the difference between them?
5
votes
2answers
746 views

How do “need” and “not” mix and match?

You don't need to play You need to not play You need not play You needn't play You need not to play What does each of these mean, and which ones are equivalent to the others? Is the meaning of the ...
1
vote
0answers
355 views

“My love don't cost a thing” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much” In the Jennifer Lopez song "My Love Don't Cost a Thing" she says: My love don't cost a thing ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Haven't you got X ?” or “Don't you have X ?”

In British English negative questions with the verb have (when it's a lexical verb and not an auxiliary) can be formed in two ways. Is there any difference between them? Type 1 Haven't I got your ...