Negation is the process that turns an affirmative statement (e.g. "I am American") into its opposite denial (e.g. "I am not American").

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18 views

did not think he would steal some

a. I did not think he would steal some of my ideas. b. I did not think he would steal certain of my ideas. Could these sentences have two meanings: I did not think he would steal any of my ideas. ...
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3answers
80 views

Is “not very” considered polite? [closed]

I've heard that if you want to describe something in a negative way but polity, use "not very" + "negative" adj. For example, describing a bad thing would be: This is not very good. Or talking ...
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0answers
43 views

'Neither' and 'Nor' Usage

What would be the correct sentence? Neither does he abuse nor does he beat. or Neither does he abuse nor he beats.
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4answers
74 views

Meaning of “I may never be able to do this”?

The problem is, that I fail to unambiguously understand this phrase. There are two ways in which I can understand it (and a number of similar phrases): I may never be able to do this = It's ...
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0answers
17 views

Proper use of expect + negation? [duplicate]

Which one is correct / better ? I expect him to not have been called I expect him not to have been called
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3answers
32 views

What is the correct use of the negation of “There to be”?

"There is no man outside the house" "There is not a man outside the house" "There was no solution to the problem" "There was not a solution to the problem" Can I use both of them? Are the sentences ...
3
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3answers
94 views

Why is there a negation of “ability” but not a negation of “agility”?

Would like to know what is the reasoning behind the use of some prefixes for example if one were to use "un-"able as opposed to "dis-"able the situational context is understood yet the same does not ...
4
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2answers
73 views

All of …not/ Not all of / None of

Some grammar rules say "All of ... are not" and "Not all of ... are" have the same meaning, yet they are different from "None of ... are". For example: 1) Not all of the books I have are science ...
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2answers
76 views

Is “little of fun” correct?

I watched a class in which the teacher was explaining how to use quantifiers. One of her examples was "I had lots of fun last night". However, she used the example "I didn't have little of fun last ...
3
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1answer
55 views

What's the difference between “He is no fool” and “He is not a fool”? [duplicate]

For a non-native speaker, the above two sentences seem similar. From the point of the native speaker's view, is there any slight difference? In the same vein, "I have no money" and "I don't ...
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1answer
28 views

declined to override a veto - is that a Yes or a No?

The full sentence from the New York Times reads: One day after a mass shooting in California left 14 people dead, Republican lawmakers in New Jersey declined on Thursday to override Gov. Chris ...
3
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1answer
96 views

difference between the prefix “un” and “not” [closed]

is there any plausible way to seperate the semantics of undefined - not defined or undetermined - not determined ?
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2answers
45 views

Can a negative ever mean the opposite outside of double negatives? “ex: I was not a little disturbed by the news” [duplicate]

I saw this sentence while reading:"The mansion was lovely-she particularly liked the topiary-but not a little intimidating." I don't understand the function of the not? from context she is ...
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1answer
31 views

Negation of two things

Which one of the following is correct? We don't need to know A, nor B, individually. Instead, we only need the sum of A and B. or We don't need to know A and B individually. Instead, we only ...
3
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1answer
74 views

Not only not A, but also B. Does this imply B or not B?

Let's take the following two statements. He who lives in a glass house shall not cast stones (1) He who lives in a glass house shall have his toilet in the basement. (2) Now, if we try to ...
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1answer
42 views

Implied Negations

For the idiomatic phrase, "There, but for the grace of God, go I", I take it literally to mean "There I would go, but because of God's grace, I don't." If I'm correct, I'm confused as to where this ...
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2answers
42 views

Double negative Q/A?

If someone asks "Can I not have a drink?", and someone else responds "No", is that considered as: No = No, you can't not have a drink. = You can have a drink. or No = No, you can't have a ...
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0answers
49 views

Meaning of a positive answer to a negative question [duplicate]

I'm watching Orange Is the New Black, and I'm confused about whether a woman character said she did something well or not. This is the conversation. Man: "Don't make me regret putting you in ...
1
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1answer
120 views

“Not X so much as Y” vs. “not so much X as Y”

E.g. which don't describe an action so much as describe a state of being which don't so much describe an action as describe a state of being Are both constructions grammatically ...
2
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1answer
114 views

How to use will in tag questions [closed]

Open the door, will you? Open the door, won't you? As I know the first one is the right one, but last week I came across with the second one, so I am really confused now.
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2answers
236 views

Can we use “not either” instead of “neither”?

Can we use "not either" instead of "neither"? For example, given that… I don't like football I don't like basketball … which of the following are correct? A. I like neither football nor ...
0
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1answer
142 views

Is it okay to use “doesn’t” twice in one sentence? [closed]

I wonder if it's okay to use "doesn't" twice in one sentece. Example I think that she doesn't do something and it doesn't something... Should I split it or it's completely correct? I mean two ...
1
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2answers
919 views

“I never was” vs. “I was never”

What is the difference between "I never was" and "I was never"? It seems that there is a subtle difference, but I can't quite grasp it. Is one of them informal? For example: I never was a good ...
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1answer
70 views

Negative subjunctive

Some verbs require subjunctive, as in: The UN has demanded that all troops be withdrawn. A student has written: ...my sense of responsibility demands that I can't do that. What is the negative ...
2
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2answers
100 views

What does “all not” mean exactly in this context?

All DriveTest Centres do not provide car rentals to applicants. The sentence above is taken from here. In my understanding, it means some DriveTest Centres may provide car rentals while others ...
8
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3answers
259 views

Words where “not [word]” means more than a lack of

Sorry for the poor title. Is there a name/category of words with the property that using "not" before them does not give a standard negation in a way similar to the given examples? The two examples, ...
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2answers
84 views

the meaning of “they should not look nearly as different as they do”

The three species (Man, the chimpanzee and the gorilla) share almost 99 percent of their DNA, and on that basis, surely, they should not look nearly as different as they do. Am I right in ...
3
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2answers
230 views

Can we say “you can [not go] to school” or does it automatically become a negative sentence? [duplicate]

"You can [not go] to school." Can this sentence mean that you can stay here and not go, or does it automatically become a negative sentence if I say it like this?
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0answers
371 views

What is difference between no different and not different

I came up with this sentence "Our lives are no different" in a book called "You can win". I was wondering what if we say like "our lives are not different" will this change the meaning of sentence or ...
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5answers
156 views

“I don't buy no drinks.” Grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I don't buy no drinks. I saw this phrase in a song, and I'm not quite sure if it's correct I hope you'll help me find the answer. Thank you in advance.
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2answers
316 views

My father had no much money / My father did not have much money [closed]

Can both sentences be acceptable? (1) My father did not have much money. (2) My father had no much money. If one of them is incorrect, what is the grammatical reason why?
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0answers
49 views

Is there a verb for 'to make negative'? [duplicate]

If I am instructing someone to make a number negative, is there a verb I can use? Negitivise? Negify? Negate, for me, does not work as this is to cancel out, rather than turn a number into the ...
9
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3answers
163 views

Negating a raising verb vs its complement infinitive [duplicate]

Consider the sentence: I don't seem to have enough time. Theoretically, it could be rephrased: I seem to not have enough time. It seems to be grammatically correct, but it sounds a bit ...
9
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1answer
358 views

When can I use “Only do …” vs. when must I use “Only …” without the “do”?

I'm writing a scientific paper and my supervisor (who is non-native speaker, whereas I am a native speaker) asked me to change this construct: Only do males have a y chromosome. to Only ...
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1answer
145 views

What job don't students like very much?

I need to have my English students read a pie chart containing information about jobs. One of the questions I wrote is: "What job don't students like very much?" (They are expected to read the ...
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1answer
81 views

The previous text (has not | does not | not) written correctly [closed]

I have a simple sentence, but I have some confusion on it. What is the correct choice and why ? The previous text (has not | does not | not | something else) written correctly. I choose "has ...
1
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2answers
616 views

Position of Adverbs in Negative Sentences [closed]

How am I supposed to write the sentences below in the negative form? Example A: A.1) Lila is certainly not going to be very happy about it or A.2) Lila isn't certainly going to be very ...
5
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2answers
95 views

What the heck is “not”, anyway?

Consider the following sentences: Enough are present to form a quorum. Not enough are present to form a quorum. M-W and Wiktionary both label enough as a pronoun in this usage, but they also ...
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3answers
118 views

Negative form of “Here comes the guy” [closed]

Consider the sentence: Here comes the guy. What would be the best negative form of this sentence--not normal negative like "The guy doesn't come here", but both inverted and negative? One ...
4
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2answers
157 views

It Is Imperative That You Be Not Afraid?

A question closed recently as proofreading asked about the grammaticality of the following subjunctive statement: They suggested that the washing machine not be put in that place. To my ear, that ...
2
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1answer
191 views

Possessive followed by negative gerund

Is it correct to say this? Her not paying attention to the class annoys me.
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2answers
81 views

Which one is better?

" They want nobody's sympathy." Or " They don't want anyone's sympathy." I know they're grammatically correct, but I guess they suit at separate occasions. I mean, one means slightly diffetent. Am i ...
3
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2answers
723 views

Can I use 'better still' in negative sentences?

Can I use 'better still' in a negative sentence? I'm especially interested in American English usage. Does it sound natural to say: You may not have the access to a trusted counselling, or better ...
2
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3answers
790 views

“or not” vs. “or no”: Which one is correct? [closed]

Which of the following is correct? Are you coming to the gym or not? Are you coming to the gym or no?
0
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2answers
117 views

Does the phrase “so long as” have a negative sense?

Can I use neither . . . nor following the phrase so long as? I read this sentence in an article: When I was in college a Marwari friend of mine told me that her parents would be totally open to ...
0
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3answers
94 views

Negation of a chain of verbs conjoined with “and”

Let's consider the following sentence: Ducks are things that walk like ducks and quack like ducks. Now, I wanna negate it to describe something that is not a duck. The most verbose way to do it ...
0
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1answer
600 views

“I don't agree totally” vs. “I don't totally agree” vs. “I totally don't agree”

What is the difference between the following? I don't agree with him totally. I don't totally agree with him. I totally don't agree with him. I'm puzzled at the meaning of negative ...
7
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1answer
214 views

A word for words that are often seen in their negative forms

Words like "misconstrue" or "disgruntled" are fairly common. But you much less commonly see the word "construe" or "gruntled" Is there a term for words like this?
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3answers
121 views

Correct usage of 'not'

I wrote this sentence as the email subject this morning - "Will login not before 12 pm". This has got me thinking if what I wrote is correct or the sentence should have been - "Will not login before ...
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1answer
40 views

Negative granting [closed]

I want to say for example to my kid that tomorrow he has the option to not wear formal shirts in school. What is the best way to say that ? "You can not to wear formal shirt tomorrow" ? Or in some ...