Negation is the process that turns an affirmative statement (e.g. "I am American") into its opposite denial (e.g. "I am not American").

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1answer
36 views

When do I use non-, ir-/i-, dis-, a-, or un-?

Between using the prefixes non-, ir-, i-, and dis-, a-, or un-, meaning "not (root word) to do something", when is the best time to use each?
3
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1answer
65 views

can't ever vs can never

I can never win. Or I can't ever win. Can these be used interchangeably? Is there a case where one would work and the other wouldn't?
2
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1answer
50 views

Past verb + not

I've found the following constructions with past verbs: They found not the fire. You knew not that. Is this an archaic way? Can we use with "ED" ending verbs, "crossed not the line" or ...
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2answers
38 views

Word usage of “not to fly” vs “to not fly ” [duplicate]

I often read the phrase "not to" preceding an action, as in "not to run" or "not to swim". It seems awkward. Please explain explain the usage.
4
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4answers
179 views

Why do not we ask negative questions without a contraction on the not after the verb?

I have found multiple questions touching on this but not a single one that has a comprehensive answer. The information is all there but in little bits. "Do you not" vs. "Don't ...
0
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0answers
49 views

“I think she is not right” - is this sentence correct?

I know you can say "I don't think she's right" but I was wondering whether there is another way to say that.
12
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2answers
567 views

Why do we say INcomplete but UNcompleted?

I'm a native speaker and it's just occurred to me that this is a strange irregularity: "The work is incomplete." < Fine "The work is uncompleted." < Less common but still sounds ...
0
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1answer
39 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
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4answers
136 views

Modals - ability

"He was able to win the race." It means he won the race. Can it also mean he didn't win? - he didn't use the ability to win. If not, how to express the idea?
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1answer
34 views

Dependent clause and negation with “nor”

I came up with sentences involving dependent clause ("that" clause) and/or negation with "nor" with varying degrees of complexity. He doesn't sing nor dance. I don't think he dances. I don't think ...
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1answer
53 views

I care not (for these things) vs. I don't care

Is the expression "I care not" grammatically correct? Do I care not and I don't care have the same meaning?
0
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0answers
29 views

Complex usage of “nor” and explanation

I'm positive this is an acceptable usage of "nor," but I can't find a rule that explains the usage. Please help! He was too tired to walk to the next open crossing. Nor to start an argument.
2
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2answers
44 views

Why can we omit a phrase that ends up changing the meaning of the preceding statement

I'm certain my terminology is wrong. Sorry in advance. I'm working with a student trying to understand a tutorial on 3D modeling written in English. The student is Japanese. The translation is not ...
4
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1answer
404 views

Are there many words that come with “a” as the prefix to mean “no, non” like “asymptomatic” and “apolitical”?

I didn’t know the word, “asymptomatic” to my shame, until I heard the following narration in AP Radio news aired on October 27 through AFN network: “Dr. Anthony Fauci with the NIH says CDC ...
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2answers
98 views

“Why does he not?” or “Why does not he?” and why? [duplicate]

Which is the more correct form: Why does he not? Why does not he? and why? At first blush 1 would seem to be grammatical - just on an intuitive judgement. However 2 logically seems as ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Using do not and don't (I do not think of it)

Man: What do you think of the view? Droid: I do not think of it. Man: I don't think of it. I don't. Droids and apostrophes, I could write a book, except you are... barely a droid anymore. (c) Deep ...
1
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1answer
200 views

Is “neither I” grammatically correct?

I'm just trying to figure out if "neither I" is grammatically correct as a standalone statment (in spoken English).
0
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1answer
32 views

negative and or

With following two conditions, Do not use A, if possible. Do not use B, if possible. How can I make it as a sentence? Which one is right? Do not use A or B, if possible. or Do not use A nor ...
2
votes
2answers
68 views

Negating two verbs separated by or

I'm curious about the logical implications of phrasings of the form: not given or received In my mind, this can parse as either "not (given or received)" or "(not given) or (received)", which ...
0
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3answers
62 views
0
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4answers
851 views

Can I say, “He needs to go there and not need to participate”?

I have a question about the use of verb to need. Which of the following sentences is the correct form? He needs to go there and not to participate or He needs to go there and does not need ...
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3answers
109 views

Negative form of “satisfy”, correct usage of “such”, difference between “quick” and “fast”

I just did an English test on the Internet because I have an entry exam tomorrow and I wanted to recap. I got 91% right, but I wanted to find out why I made these mistakes and what the correct way to ...
3
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3answers
190 views

What's the correct form of the negative subjunctive?

It is essential that [some parameter] be not reset during the day. (1) It is essential that [some parameter] not be reset during the day. (2) Which one is the correct form? I do know the ...
0
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0answers
75 views

Most accurate affirmative form of a sentence

The sentence is I can never forget you. We have to find the affirmative form of this sentence without changing its meaning. I can think of two answers for this question. 1.I will always remember ...
1
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1answer
165 views

Explain this sentence to me please

I'm taking this true or false questionnaire for work. One question is Most supervisors accept that you cannot always call in for an absence. true or false
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1answer
92 views

“I'm not going to have…” vs. “I'm going not to have…” vs. “I'm going to not have”

Is there a rule that governs when you change around the placement of "not" in a sentence relative to the verb? For example: I'm NOT going to Spain to have fun. or I'm going, NOT to have fun, ...
0
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1answer
331 views

“Unavailable” vs. “not available” [duplicate]

What is the difference between unavailable and not available? In my opinion, unavailable is something that will never be available, while not available is something that is not available right now ...
4
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4answers
258 views

Use of 'not' in questions

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? I believe that the person asking would include the 'not 'when he believes the implied to be true. For example: "Are you going to the store? "Are ...
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0answers
41 views

How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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4answers
529 views

What is the meaning of not in “as often as not” and “as likely as not”?

Am I failing to get a point here? Collins English Dictionary: as often as not: quite frequently as likely as not: very probably Considering the meanings of these phrases, to my eye, ...
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2answers
83 views

A simple question about syntax [closed]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
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2answers
120 views

Ambiguity in Negation: “John did not come because of the rain”

John did not come because of the rain. This sentence seems to allow the following two completely different interpretations. John did not come. And the reason was the rain. John came. But the ...
13
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1answer
202 views

The use of “not” in idiomatic English

The Daily Mirror recently used the phrase "Pentagon experts on Friday said it was impossible to imagine that the missile could not have been fired without Russian help". This exact phrase has appeared ...
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1answer
123 views

untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
0
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1answer
117 views

Nor without neither?

I am correcting a translation for a friend. He wanted to say: "Don't look for treasure nor earthly pleasure." This sounds wrong to me. I would say: "Look not for treasure nor earthly pleasure." ...
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2answers
674 views

“Would have not” vs. “would not have”

That would not have happened if John had completed his work. That would have not happened if John had completed his work. The former seems correct. The latter doesn't seem incorrect. ...
0
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1answer
36 views

What is the difference between “not that X is going to Y” and “X is not going to Y”? [closed]

Not that running away is going to solve everything. Running away is not going to solve everything. I am not a native speaker. Is there a difference between the two?
0
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1answer
301 views

Can we say “I can't not go” or for instance “i couldn't not look” [duplicate]

I've seen this in an English Learning Facebook page that we can say: I can't not go I can't not tell her I couldn't not eat I couldn't not look Are they true? Is it formal or informal? What ...
1
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1answer
30 views

Does the negative enhance the sentence?

When saying, for example, "Isn't that your mother?" versus "Is that your mother?" Is the former sentence more effective because of the negative?
2
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0answers
49 views

Reply to a question with “Yes, it is” or “No, it is” [duplicate]

What is the correct response to the following question: Ten divided by five is not two? 1) Yes, it is. 2) No, it is. Intuitively I would say "Yes, it is", but then I thought about it in the ...
3
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6answers
188 views

Is there a functional difference between “not believing” and “believing not”?

If you tell your friend some incredible story and they say, "I don't believe you!" It seems like they are pretty obviously trying to say that they believe that your story isn't true. I have someone ...
0
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2answers
202 views

Does “you don't want X” mean “I don't recommend X to you”?

Quite often I read exchanges like this: — I want [something], I tried this and that but still no luck, how can I do that? — You don't want [it]. An example: example. I'm Russian, and this ...
0
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4answers
104 views

It's not ___, but it's not not ___ either

Are there general modifiers for adjectives that indicate a gray area between the adjective and its negative? E.g., "Plywood isn't wooden, but it isn't not-wooden either. Therefore, plywood is ____ly ...
0
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5answers
2k views

Transform negative to affirmative? [closed]

What is the affirmative form of the following sentence? He is neither poor nor honest. I tried, but couldn't transform it from negative to affirmative.
19
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5answers
2k views

What is this “Nor”?

And I saw Tityos, son of glorious Gaea, lying on the ground. Over nine roods he stretched, and two vultures sat, one on either side, and tore his liver, plunging their beaks into his bowels, nor ...
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votes
1answer
74 views

reporting statements: that-clauses [closed]

How would you write the negative statement of: She declared the item to be faulty, the police reported the girl to be missing. Would it be: She declared the item not to be faulty, the ...
0
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0answers
36 views

“I'm not” or “I amn't” or “I am not”? [duplicate]

Does there exist a short form of I am not? I'm not or I amn't or I am not?
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Is “Rouse me not” grammatically permissible? [duplicate]

In A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin, he writes that the “words” [see footnote] of House Grandison are Rouse Me Not. Is this grammatically correct? Does English allow such word-scrambling ...
2
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2answers
1k views

What are the differences between “seems not” and “doesn't seem”?

Are the following sentences correct? He seems not to want to help us and He seems want to help us. Is it correct if I use "seem" in a negative sentence? Which role does "seem" play? ...
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2answers
1k views

“No” vs. “not” for negation

I am not clear about the use of no and not . I have come across two sentences like: All I asked was time, not money. I met this person about a month ago. I remember his name, what he was ...