Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

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7
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4answers
651 views

What is the plural form of trademarked product names, specifically of the term “WordPress”?

On the stackexchange site WordPress Answers, we recently discussed the plural form, or whether one exists at all, of the system we all use. WordPress is a free and open source blogging tool and a ...
-1
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1answer
26 views

Usage of “Revised Document”

I offer two Word templates and recommend to use one of them in order to get a well-designed document. Using the expression revised document is correct in this case? For example: It is ...
0
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1answer
30 views

How to write down this name? [closed]

Is there an english name or English translation that matches the following voice recording? https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/62131673/audio/endesuelax2.wav The name might be Russian or Ukrainian.
2
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1answer
52 views

why was there a surge in the name 'Tiffany' in the late 1980s?

Last night Tiffany Porter won a gold medal for Britain in the European Athletics Championships (Womens 100m hurdles). It came as no surprise to discover that she began life as an American. Apart from ...
14
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2answers
32k views

Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe?

Many questions already ask about this topic (What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? , Adding apostrophe-s to a singular noun already ending in “s”, etc.) and their answers vary, but ...
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3answers
56 views

A word to depict the degree of currentness [closed]

Please note that the nature of this question is based on position, not time. We are working on a control similar in functionality (displaying spinnable items, but not only restricted to displaying ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Why are names considered proper nouns?

Names are supposed to be proper nouns because they refer to a unique entity, right? But what about when the condition of specificity is not applicable? Take the word "Albert". It's supposed to be a ...
0
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0answers
58 views

Using English naming customs for foreign names

In the English-speaking world, many Russians are known primarily by their first and last name: Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy. However, from what I've read, the usual practice in Russian is to ...
6
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2answers
591 views

Last names that are English words with an extra 'e'

I noticed that there are a lot of last names that have an 'e' at the end. The pronunciation usually isn't changed from that of the base word. Poole Steele Browne Clarke Why do English words not ...
5
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3answers
2k views

What is the name for a person who raises turkeys?

Some agricultural professions have specific names assigned to them. For example, a person who raises sheep is a shepherd and a person who raises cattle is a rancher. What would a person who raises ...
2
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1answer
74 views

What do you call “How do you do” type questions? [closed]

Does English have a name for questions with counterintuitive answers? For example: "How do you do?" -> not "I am fine."
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6answers
3k views

keeping maiden name after marriage

If a woman keeps her maiden name what is the proper way to address her? Mrs, Ms, or Miss? I have seen it done multiple ways, but am unsure what is the proper way.
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4answers
2k views

Surely *some* wordsmiths must love America[ns]?

People who like/admire English or French (the languages and/or the people and their culture) are easily identified as Anglophiles or Francophiles. I'm not sure there are so many Germanophiles, but ...
0
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2answers
69 views

Middle initial placement

First question: My name is Anh D. Pham, but I go by “Andy”. If I want to include my nickname, where should I put the nickname portion? Anh D. “Andy” Pham Anh “Andy” D. Pham Second ...
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1answer
203 views

What is the meaning of the name Zacharias Mulletstein? [closed]

I saw the name Zacharias Mulletstein in a newsgroup and thought "what a peculiar yet interesting name." When I mentioned this name to a friend (because the post by this fella was amusing) they said ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Why do many names use “y” in place of expected “i”?

I would expect names like Taylor, Poynting have "i" in place of actual "y", because they sound very similar to words "tailor" and "pointing". There's also Feynman, which some (not really credible ...
7
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1answer
4k views

What is the term for a person with same first and last name?

What is it called when a person has the exact same first and last name (and same spelling), whether named by parents or as a result of marriage? For example, Thomas Thomas.
5
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2answers
161 views

Buckley's Chance

In Australian parlance we have the expression "He's got Buckley's chance" or "You've got two chances - Yours and Buckley's". Meaning - he o you have no chance at all. Who was Buckley?
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2answers
64 views

Any rule about superheroes and hyphens in their names? [closed]

You really know this fact that Spider-man is hyphenated. But why? Any grammatical rule? Is he unique hero written with a hyphen, unlike Batman, Superman etc.?
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1answer
100 views

Signature for Doctor of Information Technology prefix and suffix [closed]

How can I sign my name with the degree of "Doctor of Information Technology" Is this all correct Dr.Full Name Full Name D.I.T Dr Full Name (Doctor of Information Technology) Dr.Last Name Can I ...
0
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2answers
123 views

Does the word 'melao' have any special meaning when it is used as a name?

Yesterday, I told an Indian my English name is 'Melao', he smiled and asked me if there's any special meaning. In fact, I get this name from a song with Latin style -- 'Corazon De Melao', I think it's ...
2
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3answers
803 views

What is the origin of the place name “Unthank”?

I was reading this question What is the reciprocal verb of "to thank"?, and naturally the (non existent, but surely quite useful) word unthank came to mind. I then recalled there are several places in ...
2
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3answers
173 views

What is a succinct positive name for a busybody ( non impacted stakeholder )?

I am looking for a word that does not have a negative connotation and is a succinct general term for a: non user, but vocal, stakeholder. Arbitrary example: Say a new road was going to be built ...
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2answers
391 views

Single vs double quotation marks for nickname?

I am trying to conform to the British practice (specifically Oxford Style Guide) and I am a little confused which to use to mark a nickname: Andrew 'Andy' Johnson Andrew "Andy" Johnson I know ...
3
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6answers
621 views

Word to describe the fear of unknown future

Is there any word to describe the fear of unknown future? Like when you cannot anticipate your future, you don't know what will happen or what can happen, not near or immediate future, but some future ...
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2answers
350 views

Do any UK place names have non-ASCII characters? [closed]

Are there any place names in the UK that have non-ASCII characters? I’m looking for any cities, towns, villages, etc. in the UK that use characters that aren’t in the basic ASCII range (code points ...
9
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1answer
741 views

What is the origin of surnames based on color?

I understand the background of names such as Baker, Carver and Hammer but, what are the origins of names such as Black, Blue, Brown, Green and White? Are they based on some common structure or do they ...
0
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2answers
54 views

Swashes: What are they? [closed]

I always thought swashes were a way to call wet wipes/wet tissues/wet towels/moist towelettes -or- whatever you call them. Recently, though, I realized that Swashes is actually a company that makes ...
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4answers
16k views

Changes in English names of people

Why is Robert called Bob and John called Jack sometimes? What is the history of or reason for this practice in changing the English names of people?
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7answers
1k views

Are all English surnames-made-first-names masculine?

This may not be an English language question, but I've always wondered. In Sweden, it is very unusual to have surnames that can also be used straight up as first names. In fact, I can think of no such ...
4
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2answers
5k views

“John Doe”, “Jane Doe” - Why are they used many times?

I posted a question ( http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/92215/john-doe-jane-doe-why-are-they-used-many-times ) and they told me to post that question here. So I'm doing it. I received ...
13
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4answers
2k views

Is there an English word for a person who shares your name? [duplicate]

In Sweden, if your name is Sven Andersson and there is a person of interest (for any reason) that has the same name as you, there is a slightly affectionate word you can use where you say that this ...
0
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2answers
57 views

How to call the scientists who work in the natural sciences?

How to call the scientists who work in the natural, technical, biological and other sciences? Can I call them natural scientists, technical scientists and so on?
3
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1answer
117 views

Why is there an 'a' at the end of “Crimea”?

With the recent events in Crimea and the Ukraine the name of the peninsula appears a lot in both written and spoken, the a at the end is very conspicuous in the English pronunciation and writing, ...
2
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2answers
89 views

What is the 'last_name, first_name' format called?

Is there a name for the format of listing names by 'Last name, first name'? For example, how names were listed in phone books when those existed. Ex: this list of names is sorted (blank style): ...
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2answers
120 views

Pseudonym of a graffiti artist

What do you call a pseudonym of a street art/graffiti artist? Word 'pseudonym' is too general. So I need exactly something like '[street] artist pseudonym', but also not 'tag' or 'nickname'. To the ...
1
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1answer
58 views

“The Hypercube algorithm is so …” or “Hypercube algorithm is so…”? [duplicate]

I have an algorithm inspired by mathematical concept called hypercube. I use Hypercube algorithm as a name. Now when I write about it, do I need "the" article in front of the name "Hypercube ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Why are names that begin with 'Mc' first in order over names that begin with 'Ma'?

Why are names that begin with 'Mc' first in order over names that begin with 'Ma'? For example, in references sections in books, we see that "McGann, Anthony" is first and "Maddox, Graham" is second. ...
2
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1answer
177 views

Writing quotes of a business name with star as hyphen

I have a business with a name e.g. "my business". Wherever you see the company name it's always written as my★business - the company logo is similar and anywhere we write the name on the ...
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3answers
2k views

Is there an accepted rule for naming all of our various distant relatives (Kinship Terms)?

I’m going to the christening of my Cousin’s first son soon. What is the proper name for his relation to me? 2nd Nephew? Nephew once removed? Nothing? Looking at the overall picture, whats the ...
9
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1answer
217 views

How to cite an author who spells his name inconsistently

I am writing a paper where I will cite several works by the Hungarian mathematician Gábor Szegő. Note that his surname includes the letter o with a double acute accent, NOT a letter o with umlaut ö. ...
59
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3answers
6k views

Is there a single term for “nieces and nephews”?

I find it handy when talking about my sons and daughters I can just say my children. It's nice to say nieces instead of sibling's daughters. I wonder if there is a similar term for nieces and nephews ...
8
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1answer
419 views

Why do English men's names almost always stress the first syllable?

While looking at names of American Presidents I noticed that English men’s names almost always stress the first syllable. Barack Obama is unusual in that he’s only the second President (after ...
2
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2answers
134 views

Where does the anglicisation “Ottoman” come from?

Wikipedia on Ottoman Empire gives its naming as coming from the Ottoman Turkish language, but on that very page, the name of the language is transliterated as Lisân-ı Osmânî. In Russian we call the ...
2
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1answer
190 views

Is there a word that describes a person whose given name and surname each contains but a single syllable?

Is there a word that describes a person whose given name and surname each contains but a single syllable? Some examples are: Mae West Bill Fold John Doe
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vote
1answer
217 views

What is the correct romanization of the Russian name “Андрей” — “Andrey” or “Andrei”? [closed]

What is the most preferable: "Andrey" or "Andrei" for the Russian name "Андрей"? Wikipedia gives both variants.
2
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3answers
93 views

Is Father Christmas unwelcome in the United States?

Is the name Father Christmas used in the US or is it mainly Santa Claus (and Santa)? Does Father Christmas sound unusual or out of place if it was used in the US? Would it be laughed at? As an ...
2
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2answers
549 views

How does one address a blended family in which the members have different surnames?

I am confused about how to address a family in which all the members have kept their original surname. What is the proper way to address such a family in a note to a family which consists of a single ...
0
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2answers
143 views

Can I use Partty (with double “t”) instead of Party? [closed]

I am looking for a domain name that ends with Party. However, those names I am looking are already taken. So if I use, lets say , www.WePartty.com (with double 't') instead of www.WeParty.com , would ...
2
votes
2answers
114 views

Are references to names, proper nouns?

We all know proper nouns refer to a specific person, place, organization, ect. Are names that do not refer to specific entities still considered proper nouns such as Samantha in the example below? If ...