Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

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1answer
106 views

What does the word “tie” (and the thing called “tie”) imply? [closed]

I find the symbolic meaning of standard pieces of clothing or jewelry fascinating. For instance, high heel shoes for women. A colleague of feminist persuasion once said that apart from all other ...
-1
votes
2answers
311 views

How are names ending in “-s” perceived?

Most English nouns are inflected for grammatical number by adding -s — e.g., cat and cats, where cats is and sounds plural. So, I wonder, since Lucas, Nicholas, and other English names end with -s, ...
4
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0answers
289 views

Why do so many names end in -May or -Mae? [closed]

I've been reading articles about trends in names. Apparently names like Bonnie-Mae, Ellie-Mae and Lily-Mae are trending up in the UK which I find odd in itself (aren't they typically Southern US?) but ...
3
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4answers
245 views

How to pronounce the family name “Penhallow”

How to pronounce the family name Penhallow? I'm translating the story "A Tangled Web" by L. M. Montgomery into Russian.
1
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1answer
17k views

What's the right way to pronounce “Louis”?

The name of the comedian Louis C.K. is pronounced LU-EE-SEE-KAY. Is the S pronounced as a part of the given name "Louis", or just the first constant of the of the letter C? Is there a canonical way ...
1
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1answer
3k views

Use of the definite article before a person's name or pronoun

Hey native English speakers, My question is regarding the use of the definite article before a person's name, as in Realtime with the Bill Maher on HBO (youtu.be/I9HCbOmwndA?t=8m40s) or in the ...
22
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2answers
3k views

Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex' [closed]

I know that Sussex and Middlesex are in England. It looks to me as if there is a pattern in names. What does the suffix -sex mean? Where does it come from?
2
votes
2answers
849 views

Why do people keep mispronouncing my name, Divine?

My name is Divine--like the English word, "divine". There are no tildes, no accent marks, no umlauts, or funky letters like æ...nothing shady going on here. Yet every time someone reads my name, i ...
18
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13answers
3k views

A word that describes something that has been given a name

Is there a word besides named that describes something that has been given a proper name? For example, a guitar is just a guitar, but if I call it, say, Shirley, is there another word that would now ...
1
vote
1answer
628 views

In an international software, should I use First name / Last name instead of Full name? [closed]

I'm building a software meant to be used internationally. At first I don't have localization features so I intend to use an "international English". I must say the US market is big and I may do ...
0
votes
2answers
463 views

What word describes the form of address in which someone is called “Dad” or “Mum”?

I'm writing about what people might call God when praying, things like "Lord" or "Father" etc. With respect to using "Dad" or "Mum", would you call them names? (not exactly - not like "Brian" for ...
0
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1answer
312 views

When writing a formal report is it bad to make up names when giving an example?

I was giving an example and was trying to immerse the reader in the experience as much as possible and made up a man's name. Consider the following example: Joseph is testing a program built for ...
0
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2answers
720 views

Party at the Johnsons's? [duplicate]

What is the proper use of the apostrophe in this phrase: The party is at the Johnsons's Assuming, the regular form of the last name is "Johnson" and there are at least two people in the Johnson ...
6
votes
2answers
213 views

What is the origin of using the word “our” preceding a first name when speaking directly to the person so named

In the BBC's Keeping Up Appearences, and Lark Rise to Candleford, "our Rose" and "our Laura" are used in both the third person and second person. The usage seems understandable as a third person ...
4
votes
2answers
229 views

What is the term for an item that facilitates the tying of things together?

Is there some piece of equipment or item that allows you to tie two or more strands of rope threads of fabric together? I imagine that (1) and (2) will be different items. If such things do ...
8
votes
4answers
37k views

Where do you put the suffix when listing the last name first?

When listing names with the last name first, where should you put the suffix if there is one present? For example, if given the name John Doe Jr., which of the following would be correct? Doe, John ...
1
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2answers
197 views

Is it acceptable to drop the Jr. suffix in a citation?

I want to cite a book written by John P. Smith, Jr. Should I write see Smith [2009] for details. or see Smith, Jr. [2009] for details. I think my question boils down to: is his surname ...
8
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1answer
12k views

What do you call a daughter with the same name as her mother?

What do you call a daughter with the same name as her mother? Is there a female equivalent for 'junior' in the english language?
1
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1answer
1k views

use of articles with personal names modified by adjectives

Suddenly, to everybody's surprise, the silent Mr.Smith swung around and addressed Barbara. The dinner was served by a silent Mrs. Keats. I saw an infuriated Jennifer, who started shouting at ...
1
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2answers
553 views

Do any UK place names have non-ASCII characters? [closed]

Are there any place names in the UK that have non-ASCII characters? I’m looking for any cities, towns, villages, etc. in the UK that use characters that aren’t in the basic ASCII range (code points ...
0
votes
2answers
253 views

How to pronounce “Zoubin Ghahramani”? [closed]

Zoubin Ghahramani is a computer scientist and statistician. I tried Google translate but it sound a little weird. Does anyone know the pronunciation of his name? Is it from another language other than ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

Could I address someone by first name in business emails if he/she addresses me by first name?

I am really not sure about when it is appropriate to use someone's first name in business emails. If someone addresses me by my first name, but signs his email officially — full name, plus title, ...
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votes
1answer
342 views

An Ozibox user OR a Ozibox user is correct? [duplicate]

Which one is better and why? 1) Are you an Ozibox user? 2) Are you a Ozibox user? Ozibox is the name of a web application
0
votes
2answers
144 views

How to refer to people and how they're related?

I'm trying to document an issue with an application, and I'd like to refer to the people using different words regardless of the relationship (father, son, etc.) being used. To better explain the ...
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4answers
216 views

Special name for royal titles?

Is there a name for the title/nickname that some members of royalty get? For example, "King Larry the Kind".
2
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5answers
2k views

Indefinite article and people's names

Sometimes, on the internet, particularly in online games, I see people using the indefinite article before someone's name: "I see a Joey" or "I hug a Polly". I know some of these people and I'm ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

Origin of street names ending in “-hurst”

There is a large number of streets in the UK whose names end in -hurst, for example Ravenhurst, Gathurst, Oakhurst, Amhurst, Bonehurst, Eaglehurst, etc. Is there a common meaning for this -hurst ...
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2answers
236 views

Reversing name order [closed]

My current task is to create a (programming) algorithm which reverts a name's order. This since my country's formal name-listing order is different from international ones. The standard is often: ...
-1
votes
2answers
288 views

I work in a hospital. I want to know what we should call the proof of appointment

I work in a hospital. I want to know what we should call the proof of appointment. And I want to know the name of the place where we pay the bill after treatment.
1
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2answers
337 views

“Al” as a reduction of “Alexander” [closed]

Can I use Al as a reduction of the name Alexander? Is this reduction clear to native English speakers?
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1answer
258 views

What is the meaning of the name Zacharias Mulletstein? [closed]

I saw the name Zacharias Mulletstein in a newsgroup and thought "what a peculiar yet interesting name." When I mentioned this name to a friend (because the post by this fella was amusing) they said ...
7
votes
2answers
4k views

When did we start naming our dogs Rover, and why?

One stereotypical name for a dog is Fido, from the Latin for faithful. Another stereotypical dog-name is Rover. How long has Rover been a common name for a dog in English? Does it have anything to ...
6
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7answers
3k views

Is using the last name of a person without a title an accepted way of addressing?

I always heard people use Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms before people's names and that is how, I thought, it was done until I watched one of those Harry Potter films in which Malfoy (Sr) addresses Albus Dumbledore ...
1
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1answer
3k views

What is the possessive form of a singular noun ending with a plural s?

I would tend to treat a company name as singular and would therefore write the possessive form with 's. Now, my company refers to its international operations by placing the country name behind the ...
7
votes
1answer
6k views

What is the term for a person with same first and last name?

What is it called when a person has the exact same first and last name (and same spelling), whether named by parents or as a result of marriage? For example, Thomas Thomas.
3
votes
1answer
296 views

meaning of - rite - at the companies names

There is bunch of companies that use rite at theirs names, like Rite Aid or Shop Rite, I was thinking about it like Right => Rite They looks like similar to pronounce, and you could think Right Aid ...
7
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4answers
866 views

What is the plural form of trademarked product names, specifically of the term “WordPress”?

On the stackexchange site WordPress Answers, we recently discussed the plural form, or whether one exists at all, of the system we all use. WordPress is a free and open source blogging tool and a ...
2
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3answers
546 views

Name of the high pitch sound produced when objects are hit against each other underwater

For instance, when a spoon or ice cube hits a glass of water
0
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2answers
670 views

First name Constantin or Constantine? [closed]

Which is correct: "Constantin" or "Constantine"? I also encountered in texts "Konstantin" and "Kostantine". Or else is another spelling preferred?
3
votes
2answers
839 views

Why there is an “h” in proper names like Afghanistan, Baghdad and Lamborghini?

An "h" may be used to prevent the "g" from being soft, as in spaghetti, but there is no need for an "h" in the mentioned proper names.
2
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3answers
3k views

Possessive Form of a Proper Noun Ending in a Plural Noun Ending in “s”?

I don't think this has yet been covered in any of the other questions on similar topics. There was one other very similar question, however, it was not specifically talking about the case where the ...
4
votes
3answers
505 views

“Native” names and “western” names?

When Chinese, Koreans, and possibly other Asians migrate into countries like the UK or the US, they often take on a "western" or "anglicised" name for a number of reasons. For example, the director ...
4
votes
3answers
475 views

Titles of British Lords [closed]

In an old episode of The West Wing, a British Ambassador is referred to as "Lord John Marbury". Ignoring that once he became Ambassador he'd be Mr Ambassador, what are the possible correct addresses? ...
0
votes
2answers
135 views

Which sounds better: “What’s in ――” or “What’s on――”?

I’m making the title of a web page with classifieds, and I’d like to name it either “What’s in (town name)” or “What’s on (town name)”. Which one sounds better for a town classified web page? Right ...
2
votes
1answer
206 views

Doctor Jekyll (Ph.D.), I presume

I am writing an analysis paper (not related to title), an need to introduce someone with a doctorate in English. Do I write "Doctor [name]" or do I use suffix?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a rule to what ending you use when you construct the nationality adjective? Or where did the various endings come from? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries? In the English language, you have several endings used when you construct an adjective out of ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Foreign names: Transcription or literal spelling? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should foreign words (with foreign characters) be written in English text? Sometimes, you want to use the names of foreign people in English texts. This presents no ...
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votes
1answer
1k views

Balthazar, 'Caspar' and Melchior [closed]

The names traditionally given to the three Wise Men are Balthazar, Caspar and Melchior. But a friend of mine told me that in Australian English Caspar is not used. They use, instead, Gasper. Can ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

Express a phrase as compound [closed]

I need to express this phrase as a short compound to be used as programming variable name (this phrase is in the context of a software user interface): the block showing current chatters I have ...
20
votes
2answers
53k views

Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe?

Many questions already ask about this topic (What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? , Adding apostrophe-s to a singular noun already ending in “s”, etc.) and their answers vary, but ...