Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

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2answers
380 views

What word describes the form of address in which someone is called “Dad” or “Mum”?

I'm writing about what people might call God when praying, things like "Lord" or "Father" etc. With respect to using "Dad" or "Mum", would you call them names? (not exactly - not like "Brian" for ...
7
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4answers
3k views

Different pronunciation between Thomas and Theodore

Disclaimer: I'm no native speaker. Thomas gets pronounced with a starting "T" (the "h" is silent), while Theodore with a "Th". What rule is followed here?
0
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1answer
228 views

When writing a formal report is it bad to make up names when giving an example?

I was giving an example and was trying to immerse the reader in the experience as much as possible and made up a man's name. Consider the following example: Joseph is testing a program built for ...
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2answers
365 views

Party at the Johnsons's? [duplicate]

What is the proper use of the apostrophe in this phrase: The party is at the Johnsons's Assuming, the regular form of the last name is "Johnson" and there are at least two people in the Johnson ...
6
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2answers
183 views

What is the origin of using the word “our” preceding a first name when speaking directly to the person so named

In the BBC's Keeping Up Appearences, and Lark Rise to Candleford, "our Rose" and "our Laura" are used in both the third person and second person. The usage seems understandable as a third person ...
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0answers
4k views

Using first names with the titles Mr. and Mrs [closed]

It is proper to use the first names with Mr. & Mrs.? For example, in the invitation of an anniversary party, can one say the following: Celebrate the anniversaryof Mr. and Mrs. James and ...
4
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2answers
174 views

What is the term for an item that facilitates the tying of things together?

Is there some piece of equipment or item that allows you to tie two or more strands of rope threads of fabric together? I imagine that (1) and (2) will be different items. If such things do ...
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0answers
78 views

How to interpret polyhedron name “Rhombic Hexecontahedron”? [closed]

How to interpret polyhedron name "Rhombic Hexecontahedron"? What prefixes and suffixes that are generic and reusable? What're some examples to "make up" polyhedron names following the same style?
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2answers
27k views

What is the name for this “…” punctuation? [closed]

When I am writing, and I want to leave something out, so that it gives an implied effect, I use this: ... What is it called?
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2answers
159 views

Is it acceptable to drop the Jr. suffix in a citation?

I want to cite a book written by John P. Smith, Jr. Should I write see Smith [2009] for details. or see Smith, Jr. [2009] for details. I think my question boils down to: is his surname ...
2
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5answers
1k views

Indefinite article and people's names

Sometimes, on the internet, particularly in online games, I see people using the indefinite article before someone's name: "I see a Joey" or "I hug a Polly". I know some of these people and I'm ...
5
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3answers
825 views

Objects with no name, like “the Sun”

This morning I was pondering the things in the English language which have not been given a name, such as 'the Sun' or 'the Moon'. These do not seem to fall into the same category as 'the ground' or ...
6
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3answers
2k views

When to put “River” before or after its name and why?

Unlike mountain names, where "Mount" always precedes its name, e.g. Mount Everest, I've noticed that some rivers have "River" before its name, e.g. the River Nile but others have it after, e.g. the ...
1
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1answer
845 views

use of articles with personal names modified by adjectives

Suddenly, to everybody's surprise, the silent Mr.Smith swung around and addressed Barbara. The dinner was served by a silent Mrs. Keats. I saw an infuriated Jennifer, who started shouting at ...
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2answers
214 views

How to pronounce “Zoubin Ghahramani”? [closed]

Zoubin Ghahramani is a computer scientist and statistician. I tried Google translate but it sound a little weird. Does anyone know the pronunciation of his name? Is it from another language other than ...
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2answers
279 views

I work in a hospital. I want to know what we should call the proof of appointment

I work in a hospital. I want to know what we should call the proof of appointment. And I want to know the name of the place where we pay the bill after treatment.
2
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1answer
4k views

Could I address someone by first name in business emails if he/she addresses me by first name?

I am really not sure about when it is appropriate to use someone's first name in business emails. If someone addresses me by my first name, but signs his email officially — full name, plus title, ...
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2answers
127 views

How to refer to people and how they're related?

I'm trying to document an issue with an application, and I'd like to refer to the people using different words regardless of the relationship (father, son, etc.) being used. To better explain the ...
-2
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1answer
311 views

An Ozibox user OR a Ozibox user is correct? [duplicate]

Which one is better and why? 1) Are you an Ozibox user? 2) Are you a Ozibox user? Ozibox is the name of a web application
7
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4answers
2k views

Origin & history of name “she oak” or “sheoak” (a Casuarina tree)

In wikipedia's Casuarinaceae article (and somewhat similarly in its Casuarina article), one finds: The most widely used common name for Casuarinaceae species is sheoak or she-oak (a comparison of ...
5
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8answers
1k views

Should Philip have P. or Ph. as an initial?

In the context of scientific articles and technical white papers, references to other publications typically include the author’s surname with, depending on the format of the specific publication, ...
0
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2answers
282 views

Term for partially abbreviating names

Is there a name for the tabloid media practice of part-initializing, part-abbreviating people's names? E.g. Jennifer Lopez -> J-Lo, Robert Pattinson -> R-Patz and so on.
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2answers
186 views

Reversing name order [closed]

My current task is to create a (programming) algorithm which reverts a name's order. This since my country's formal name-listing order is different from international ones. The standard is often: ...
4
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3answers
410 views

Titles of British Lords [closed]

In an old episode of The West Wing, a British Ambassador is referred to as "Lord John Marbury". Ignoring that once he became Ambassador he'd be Mr Ambassador, what are the possible correct addresses? ...
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2answers
258 views

“Al” as a reduction of “Alexander” [closed]

Can I use Al as a reduction of the name Alexander? Is this reduction clear to native English speakers?
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2answers
3k views

When did we start naming our dogs Rover, and why?

One stereotypical name for a dog is Fido, from the Latin for faithful. Another stereotypical dog-name is Rover. How long has Rover been a common name for a dog in English? Does it have anything to ...
20
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3answers
2k views

Why do so many newspapers use the word “Times” in their names?

It seems that the word itself doesn't mean news or newspapers, but many newspapers use it in their names. Is there a historic reason?
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1answer
2k views

What is the possessive form of a singular noun ending with a plural s?

I would tend to treat a company name as singular and would therefore write the possessive form with 's. Now, my company refers to its international operations by placing the country name behind the ...
3
votes
1answer
229 views

meaning of - rite - at the companies names

There is bunch of companies that use rite at theirs names, like Rite Aid or Shop Rite, I was thinking about it like Right => Rite They looks like similar to pronounce, and you could think Right Aid ...
5
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3answers
7k views

How do I pronounce Gaudí, the architect?

How do I pronounce 'Gaudi', in the name of Antoni Gaudí (the architect)?
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3answers
402 views
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2answers
544 views

First name Constantin or Constantine? [closed]

Which is correct: "Constantin" or "Constantine"? I also encountered in texts "Konstantin" and "Kostantine". Or else is another spelling preferred?
2
votes
2answers
614 views

Why there is an “h” in proper names like Afghanistan, Baghdad and Lamborghini?

An "h" may be used to prevent the "g" from being soft, as in spaghetti, but there is no need for an "h" in the mentioned proper names.
2
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3answers
3k views

Possessive Form of a Proper Noun Ending in a Plural Noun Ending in “s”?

I don't think this has yet been covered in any of the other questions on similar topics. There was one other very similar question, however, it was not specifically talking about the case where the ...
5
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1answer
251 views

Was Christian a proper name before Pilgrim's Progress?

I was going to ask this on Christianity.SE but it's not really a Christian Doctrine question; hope it fits here. I was reading John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress where almost everyone is named for a ...
16
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1answer
295 views

I was raised being called “sister” by my family. What's the background on this usage?

I was called "sister", as a replacement for my name. (Oddly, my brother was not called "brother.") I never questioned this growing up in the 50's in a rural area. It says much about the culture I grew ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Is there a rule to what ending you use when you construct the nationality adjective? Or where did the various endings come from? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries? In the English language, you have several endings used when you construct an adjective out of ...
7
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3answers
245 views

What could the word “thumbtick” mean?

I am trying to give a piece of software a name but for non-native English speakers it's sometimes hard to avoid awkward associations with names because you don't live with the language. Sometimes word ...
0
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2answers
131 views

Which sounds better: “What’s in ――” or “What’s on――”?

I’m making the title of a web page with classifieds, and I’d like to name it either “What’s in (town name)” or “What’s on (town name)”. Which one sounds better for a town classified web page? Right ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

Can last names be shortened just as first names?

I know first names are usually shortened in verbal communication for reasons that I am not clear about. For example, Andrew becomes Andy. But is it also the case for last names? If yes, what is the ...
2
votes
1answer
183 views

Doctor Jekyll (Ph.D.), I presume

I am writing an analysis paper (not related to title), an need to introduce someone with a doctorate in English. Do I write "Doctor [name]" or do I use suffix?
0
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0answers
37 views

Foreign names: Transcription or literal spelling? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should foreign words (with foreign characters) be written in English text? Sometimes, you want to use the names of foreign people in English texts. This presents no ...
-5
votes
1answer
801 views

Balthazar, 'Caspar' and Melchior [closed]

The names traditionally given to the three Wise Men are Balthazar, Caspar and Melchior. But a friend of mine told me that in Australian English Caspar is not used. They use, instead, Gasper. Can ...
1
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1answer
96 views

Express a phrase as compound [closed]

I need to express this phrase as a short compound to be used as programming variable name (this phrase is in the context of a software user interface): the block showing current chatters I have ...
20
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2answers
2k views

Why is there a “riding” in “Little Red Riding Hood”?

I get the little, the red and the hood... but how does the riding fit in there?
5
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2answers
4k views

Is it proper to use “the” before the name of a government organization? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Definite article with proper nouns, titles followed by a common noun Using the definite article with acronyms and initialisms When I listen to major news programs, ...
-2
votes
1answer
101 views

Use of “of ” to separate the last name [closed]

Sometimes I enconter people with names in which the last part is separated with of. I wonder in which cases such usage like George of Bush, John of Doe, or Bill of Clinton is possible.
3
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1answer
170 views

The Black Country in UK

I have encountered the name The Black Country in old books. From Wikipedia: The Black Country is a loosely defined area of the English West Midlands conurbation, to the north and west of ...
5
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3answers
419 views

Why is it that John Chrysostom is almost never referred to as “John Golden Mouth” in English?

Why is it that the sainted John Chrysostom (b. 347?, d. 407; Archbishop of Constantinople, 397–407) is almost never referred to as "John Golden Mouth" in English? ("Chrysostom" means "Golden Mouth" in ...
3
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2answers
917 views

What is the correct spelling of the Arabic name سعد in English?

I need help in how to spell the Arabic name (سعد). I previously asked the question Sa'ad : Correct spelling in English and French; however, it got closed. I added a youtube video describing how ...