Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

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3
votes
8answers
248 views

Is there an English word for “a name you legally gave yourself”?

Let's say that a woman known since birth as Alice Smith changes her name to Mary Jones. Alice Smith would be her "birthname"; is there a word for Mary Jones meaning "a name she gave herself"? I see ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Why they pronounce 'Shehab', 'Shebab'? [closed]

My name, Shehab, is an Arabic word. Interesting, more than 10 white Americans and a black American have addressed me 'Shebab' (both in writing and verbally). Why is this particular mistake is so ...
25
votes
2answers
73k views

Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe?

Many questions already ask about this topic (What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? , Adding apostrophe-s to a singular noun already ending in “s”, etc.) and their answers vary, but ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Collective name for computing and embedded systems

I was wondering if there was any collective name for computing and embedded systems. They both has commonalities, so I thought there might be a world that encompasses
0
votes
1answer
67 views

How should I include names which are written in non-Latin scripts in a list of software authors?

I have a list of the authors of a software program, some of whose contributors are from such places as China and Russia. I would like to include both their transliterated Latin-script names and their ...
-1
votes
1answer
68 views

When referring to an author, should I use their pseudonym or their real name? [closed]

When referring to an author, such as in a book report or essay, should I use their pseudonym or their real name when I am speaking about them or their works? Thanks!
0
votes
2answers
90 views

Should I use “Team X” or “X Team” when “X” alone is ambiguous?

Suppose I want to put a description below a picture of a sports team or prepare t-shirts and other promotional gadgets with the name of the team. Sometimes the team is well-known (Manchester United) ...
-2
votes
2answers
677 views

Bird's Nest, Birds' Nest, or Birds Nest? [duplicate]

If I had to name a store selling bird houses from the three following options, which one would sound the most appropriate? Bird's Nest Birds' Nest Birds Nest
0
votes
0answers
229 views

First name & Last name VS Forename & Surname

Is there a difference between First name and Forename, and, Last name and Surname ? Also i would like to know how should i call each of the sections of a name, for example: Full Name: James William ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

What's the methodology for naming groups of animals? [duplicate]

Don't you find the words to name various groups of animals strange? Here are just some examples: Group of cats (wild): Destruction Group of crows: Murder Group of ravens: Unkindness Group of rhinos: ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How to write my Name? [closed]

MY First Name is Sridharan,my last Name(Father's Name)is Sitharaman.How should i write my Full Name, as Sridharan Sitharaman or Sitharaman Sridharan?
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Do these river names mean anything?

I was planning a little trip the other day when I noticed that a number of rivers in Britain have common names. The ones I spotted were Avon, Ouse and Esk. Is there a reason for this? Are these names ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Using apostrophe for plural with names

Let's say the phrase I want to write is "all of the Mike Tysons, Donald Trumps, and Morpheus's in the world." I'm guessing that the first two names do not need one and the third does. Is this correct? ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

How to mark a stressed vowel in a text?

I write an article containing many Russian names and surnames, and sometimes it is important to specify which vowel is stressed (e.g. to distinguish Baskov from Baskov). In Russian we put an accent ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

When is it appropriate to refer to someone as Dr. [Surname]?

I know that the title Dr. is often used to refer to those who practice medicine. For example, today I am going to see Dr. [Surname]. But are we in general expected to use the title when we refer to ...
0
votes
1answer
386 views

What do you call a 'Nickname' that's longer than the actual name?

I'm pretty sure I used to know the term for a nickname that was longer or an expansion of a person's name. EXAMPLE: My name is Sunny but friends sometimes call me Sunshine. Though longer, Sunshine ...
-1
votes
1answer
168 views

Best practices to address a person having the same name? [closed]

I am not a native speaker. I would really like to know how you address someone with the same name as you have. Like my name is Daniel. I met a colleague who is also called Daniel. By the way, we ...
4
votes
3answers
13k views

Origin of street names ending in “-hurst”

There is a large number of streets in the UK whose names end in -hurst, for example Ravenhurst, Gathurst, Oakhurst, Amhurst, Bonehurst, Eaglehurst, etc. Is there a common meaning for this -hurst ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Is it common practice to shorten names with an “N” [duplicate]

Game of thrones : Eddard becomes Ned. Wuthering heights : Ellen becomes Nelly. It this common practice, or 2 isolated co-incidents? If it is common practice, is there a convention followed, stating ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

“Tab Tree” or “Tabs Tree” (-s at the end) [duplicate]

I created an extension for Firefox and named it "Tabs Tree". The extension is for managing browser tabs and representing them in the form of a tree structure. But now I think that I should have named ...
26
votes
4answers
42k views

Changes in English names of people

Why is Robert called Bob and John called Jack sometimes? What is the history of or reason for this practice in changing the English names of people?
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Name for first line of something

Is there a term for the first line of something, whether it's a poem, song, or prose? Addendum: Sometimes, though not always, the first line is the same as the title, such as in Walt Whitman’s poem ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Surname plural, Wolf becomes The Wolves? [duplicate]

The Simpson family becomes The Simpsons, does that mean I can call a family with surname Wolf, The Wolves or The Wolfs? I don't know if changing letters of someone's surname is appropriate or not.
2
votes
1answer
218 views

Female names associated with healing/caring and peacefulness [closed]

I am looking for some extremely non threatening sounding female English names, that is, names which have connotations, for native speakers, which would be the opposite of killing and maiming -- names ...
0
votes
1answer
257 views

Mentioning someone's name in 1-to-1 conversation

When only two interlocutors are communicating in a face-to-face or equivalent setup without the need to get the other's attention, there is no necessity to mention the other person's name. Yet ...
12
votes
2answers
35k views

What do you call a daughter with the same name as her mother?

What do you call a daughter with the same name as her mother? Is there a female equivalent for 'junior' in the english language?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

What is the scientific name to humour that is based on surprise [duplicate]

I remember browsing through Wikipedia one day, and coming across an article defining surprise-based humour. The article had a very specific scientific name, which doesn't have the actual word ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Objects with no name, like “the Sun”

This morning I was pondering the things in the English language which have not been given a name, such as 'the Sun' or 'the Moon'. These do not seem to fall into the same category as 'the ground' or ...
2
votes
4answers
308 views

Should I put my surname after my given name when I use Pinyin as my English name?

I'm just confused about if I should put my surname after my given name or not when I tell a western people what my name is. I would like to use the Pinyin version of my original name instead of ...
0
votes
3answers
511 views

Possession in Business Name With Apostrophe [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how would I indicate possession if the word "business'" were replaced by the name of the business: like "Fry's" or "Wendy's"? Some business' employees are happy. It ...
0
votes
0answers
228 views

Initial - middle name - last name: format term?

Is there a term for a name in the "J. Edgar Hoover" (initial - middle name - last name) format? How about terms for the four name format? Consider "James Hugh Calum Laurie" and George H. W. Bush. ...
12
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is Ukraine often called “the Ukraine”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the definite article before a country/state name Hearing the Ukraine used to make me unsure whether Ukraine was really a country. Now though I have realized ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

Product name for service that manages connections [closed]

Looking for a word or catchy phrase that captures the meaning of "connection management". I work for a web-based company that manages APIs (API's are the connective tissue of the Internet of Things). ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Can last names be shortened just as first names?

I know first names are usually shortened in verbal communication for reasons that I am not clear about. For example, Andrew becomes Andy. But is it also the case for last names? If yes, what is the ...
0
votes
0answers
86 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
0
votes
1answer
204 views

Which is more appropriate here regarding in names: Junior or the 2nd?

I am from Philippines and I had a childhood friend named after his father, Cipriano Reyes, so my friend's name is Cipriano Reyes II. But as far as I know, when a child was named after his father ...
6
votes
1answer
244 views

In a conversation, do native speakers people call each other by name? [closed]

I've noticed a particular behavior in the frequency of mentioning the person's name we're talking with. I'm Italian, in my language we are used to calling each other by our first names during a ...
3
votes
3answers
212 views

In cricket and football is it alright to refer to women as men?

I noticed when I was watching the match between England and Mexico in the Women's Football World Cup the other night, that the commentator would refer to a situation where the attacking side 'had a ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Title for student organization

I'm updating the website for my student organization. Link. Officially, we are the Texas A&M University Student Branch of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. The banner at the ...
1
vote
2answers
219 views

Proper ways to refer to New York City [closed]

Excluding the myriad nicknames of the city, I've seen it called both "New York City" and "New York" in contexts where it was not ambiguous that the city, and not the state, was being referred to. I ...
-3
votes
1answer
360 views

Why Anthony, Michael etc are called Tony, Mike etc? [duplicate]

It is a common practice, people calling and writing Tony for Anthony, Mike for Michael, Max for Maxwell etc. It is correct to write or call ? I mean Anthony and tony can be two different names. Why ...
-2
votes
1answer
57 views

Proper name used for memorializing [closed]

What is the correct name to use on a commemorative plaque purchased from children and sister of the one to be celebrated. is the maiden name of person being memorialized used in combination with ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

what are these gloves called? [closed]

Gloves that have only two compartments, one for the thumb and the other wide enough for four fingers. What are they called?
2
votes
1answer
230 views

Doctor Jekyll (Ph.D.), I presume

I am writing an analysis paper (not related to title), and need to introduce someone with a doctorate in English. Do I write "Doctor [name]" or do I use a suffix?
3
votes
1answer
767 views

Should I capitalize a person's last name if their name starts with a lower case letter but it's the first word in the sentence?

I'm trying to cite someone in a paper I'm writing whose name is "[First-name] de Soya". In my field it's common to cite papers using the "et al." style ("In their seminal paper, de Soya et al. […] ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

What is the correct plural form of a family name that ends in -i? [closed]

I have just made a family group with my surname which is Karami, and I want to make my surname plural to show this is a family group, so I'm wondering whether I should add -s or -es? Which one is ...
5
votes
2answers
936 views

Why is Dolge not a Christian name?

(Note: This might be better suited for a different stack site, but since literature closed, I thought this was the closest related site). I've recently been re-reading Great Expectations, and, in ...
22
votes
1answer
4k views

Why is Lord Alfred Tennyson often written as Alfred Lord Tennyson?

Why is Lord Alfred Tennyson often written as Alfred Lord Tennyson? This occurs with and without a comma after Alfred: Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Alfred Lord Tennyson. Should Lord precede the entire ...
1
vote
3answers
55 views

Who is entitled to call themself a 'futurist'?

I've read the term being described to many inventors. e.g. Ray Kurzweil . Is anyone who discusses futuristic technology or hypothesises the future, a futurist?
1
vote
1answer
93 views

How would a speaker of English vocalize W'soran, a sci-fi/fantasy conlang word, taking into consideration that some languages are unpronounceable? [closed]

There is a character in the Warhammer Fantasy universe by the name of W'soran. I've never been sure how to pronounce his name. He's from an Egyptian type culture. Could anyone tell me if they think ...