Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

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45 views

Product name for service that manages connections

Looking for a word or catchy phrase that captures the meaning of "connection management". I work for a web-based company that manages APIs (API's are the connective tissue of the Internet of Things). ...
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0answers
23 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
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1answer
23 views

Which is more appropriate here regarding in names: Junior or the 2nd?

I am from Philippines and I had a childhood friend named after his father, Cipriano Reyes, so my friend's name is Cipriano Reyes II. But as far as I know, when a child was named after his father ...
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1answer
60 views

Ways to introduce a name in the middle of sentence

Suppose that you want to introduce a name of a thing or count several names of things in a sentence (e.g. they are namely "X", "Y", "Z") For example I know "called", "namely", perhaps "named" are ...
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1answer
97 views

In a conversation, do native speakers people call each other by name? [closed]

I've noticed a particular behavior in the frequency of mentioning the person's name we're talking with. I'm Italian, in my language we are used to calling each other by our first names during a ...
3
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3answers
141 views

In cricket and football is it alright to refer to women as men?

I noticed when I was watching the match between England and Mexico in the Women's Football World Cup the other night, that the commentator would refer to a situation where the attacking side 'had a ...
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1answer
31 views

Title for student organization

I'm updating the website for my student organization. Link. Officially, we are the Texas A&M University Student Branch of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. The banner at the ...
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2answers
85 views

Proper ways to refer to New York City [closed]

Excluding the myriad nicknames of the city, I've seen it called both "New York City" and "New York" in contexts where it was not ambiguous that the city, and not the state, was being referred to. I ...
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1answer
58 views

Why Anthony, Michael etc are called Tony, Mike etc? [duplicate]

It is a common practice, people calling and writing Tony for Anthony, Mike for Michael, Max for Maxwell etc. It is correct to write or call ? I mean Anthony and tony can be two different names. Why ...
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1answer
49 views

Proper name used for memorializing [closed]

What is the correct name to use on a commemorative plaque purchased from children and sister of the one to be celebrated. is the maiden name of person being memorialized used in combination with ...
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2answers
1k views

what are these gloves called? [closed]

Gloves that have only two compartments, one for the thumb and the other wide enough for four fingers. What are they called?
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1answer
270 views

Why do the names of so many places end in -ia?

Many countries, continents, states, and cities have an English name ending in ‘-ia’: India, Indonesia, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Australia, Asia, Alexandria, Philadelphia, California, … What ...
3
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1answer
179 views

Should I capitalize a person's last name if their name starts with a lower case letter but it's the first word in the sentence?

I'm trying to cite someone in a paper I'm writing whose name is "[First-name] de Soya". In my field it's common to cite papers using the "et al." style ("In their seminal paper, de Soya et al. […] ...
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1answer
48 views

What is the correct plural form of a family name that ends in -i? [closed]

I have just made a family group with my surname which is Karami, and I want to make my surname plural to show this is a family group, so I'm wondering whether I should add -s or -es? Which one is ...
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2answers
92 views

What is a good metaphor/ simile for your current relevant activity/ situation? [closed]

I am trying to come up with a metaphor/ simile/ descriptor for a relevant network of people depending on what you are doing (your 'activity'). Some descriptions that spring to mind are "Jungle" or ...
21
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1answer
2k views

Why is Lord Alfred Tennyson often written as Alfred Lord Tennyson?

Why is Lord Alfred Tennyson often written as Alfred Lord Tennyson? This occurs with and without a comma after Alfred: Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Alfred Lord Tennyson. Should Lord precede the entire ...
1
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1answer
60 views

How would a speaker of English vocalize W'soran, a sci-fi/fantasy conlang word, taking into consideration that some languages are unpronounceable? [closed]

There is a character in the Warhammer Fantasy universe by the name of W'soran. I've never been sure how to pronounce his name. He's from an Egyptian type culture. Could anyone tell me if they think ...
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4answers
1k views

Is it okay to ignore putting periods between initials?

My name is Venkatesh MG. M stands for the name of my birth place, which begins with M, and G is an initial derived from my father's name. Since school, I have been using only these two variations of ...
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1answer
93 views

What is this “folder-looking thingy” (image attached) called?

I knew it but I can't remember what it's called! I looked for "file/document folder/container/pocket/sleeve" .etc on Google image but couldn't find any image that looks exactly like what I have here. ...
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1answer
46 views

Do company names have to be grammatically correct? ? [closed]

For eg. can I keep my company name meetmaven instead of meetthemaven?
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1answer
100 views

What does one call this kind of Japanese toilet in English?

This was a warning notice placed near a Japanese toilet, containing one of those inimitable Japanese Engrish expressions. But as these toilets start to become popular in western countries, what is ...
0
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1answer
90 views

If you called someone named “Shelly” “Shels” for short, would you spell it “Shels” or “Shells?” [closed]

Or Kelly -- "Kels" or "Kells?" Is there a rule for this? If it's just a judgement call, I'm inclined to go with one "l" as both "Shells" and "Kells" have potentially confusing homonyms. I'm talking ...
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1answer
54 views

Become / get, successfully / effectually, together / common / united [closed]

Currently I'm looking for a product name. The goal of this product is that everyone can get successful with the power of a network (together, united) But I don't know which combination makes sense: ...
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4answers
4k views

What do you call this mechanical device?

This device usually consists of sequences of different objects, one triggering the action of the next. For example, several domino tiles placed upright. The first one falls and that makes all the ...
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3answers
40 views

Who is entitled to call themself a 'futurist'?

I've read the term being described to many inventors. e.g. Ray Kurzweil . Is anyone who discusses futuristic technology or hypothesises the future, a futurist?
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3answers
216 views

What is the name for a torture device that uses electricity to make the victim suffer?

What is the name for a torture device that uses electricity to make the victim suffer? Not as powerful as an electric chair that kills the victim outright but something which makes him suffer for a ...
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4answers
827 views

What will the third parent be called? [closed]

Legislation seems likely to pass, enabling Britain to be the first country to offer 'three-parent births' (two mothers and one father) to overcome genetic defects associated by faults in mitochondria. ...
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3answers
81 views

Is there a word for a name that has multiple words that means more than the words imply?

This is a bit hard to explain, so let's try an example. There is something called "rock art", which means human-made markings placed on natural stone. Those two words when put together have a ...
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2answers
204 views

Sugarcane or Sugar cane? [duplicate]

Is there a difference between "sugar cane" and sugarcane? Is sugarcane wrong? What is the gramatical rule for joining two names like that? I have found 13.500 entries on google for sugarcane, but ...
3
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2answers
572 views

Why is Greece not called in English by the name Hellas? [duplicate]

The Greeks call their country Hellas and themselves Hellenes. The names Greece and Greek are of Roman origin and were adopted from Latin Graecus into old High German as Crêch and then in all ...
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0answers
52 views

Why are surnames often misspellings of English words? [duplicate]

Why do English surnames so often seem to be derived from slight misspellings of common English words? Weekes Thorne Browne Lilley Keene Paige Lowe Hooke Hawthorne Sargent Whyte Chappell Horne ad ...
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2answers
164 views

How to correctly abbreviate name [closed]

Please advice on how to correctly abbreviate name. Which are grammatically correct? (if there are more correct forms please kindly add them as well) NOTE, If there is no correct way, please point ...
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1answer
64 views

Plural of “dibamus” [closed]

Dibamus is a genus of legless lizards in the family Dibamidae, of the infraorder Dibamia. Genera are usually given in singular, so what is the correct plural of Dibamus? Families and orders are ...
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0answers
62 views

going home and going to work [duplicate]

The other day I've learned that you cannot use "to" in the sentence "I am going (to) home". At the same time, you should use "to" with other place names. For example, I am going to work. Could ...
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1answer
117 views

How to pronounce Alois in A Dog of Flanders? [closed]

The e-book I have downloaded from Amazon has Alois, but Wikipedia seems to have Aloise. I do not know which one is correct in the first place. I shall assume Alois is the correct one. A Dog of ...
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2answers
74 views

Which article is used between a “name” and a “tagline” [closed]

Suppose, I am selling a new product named as: "Innob" and there is a tagline followed by it: "___, new breath in (the) town". Which article shall I use between the name and the tagline ("the" vs ...
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1answer
66 views

How to hyphenate names starting with “Mc”

Take a name starting with Mc, like McDonald. How do you hyphenate it? McDon-ald or Mc-Don-ald?
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1answer
196 views

Tolerance in English for names with vulgar everyday meaning? [closed]

Why does English (and perhaps other languages) allow collisions between names and nouns with vulgar/offensive meanings? I'm thinking of course of Dick vs. dick. Possible explanations (in no ...
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1answer
266 views

What characters are used in English for a person's name? [closed]

Obviously the letters A-Z (upper and lower case) are used in a person's name. Last names like "Smith-Brown", "Van Buren", "O'Brian" also use -, space and '. Historical ÆLFRÆD and novel names like ...
63
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2answers
12k views

Why is Sean pronounced Shawn?

I've always had this question about the pronunciation of Sean. Is Sean a word from another language? Is it actually not pronounced Shawn and instead it's some sound between Shawn and Seen? Also, why ...
4
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2answers
607 views

Why is Dolge not a Christian name?

(Note: This might be better suited for a different stack site, but since literature closed, I thought this was the closest related site). I've recently been re-reading Great Expectations, and, in ...
2
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2answers
452 views

How do I address an envelope to a married couple, who are respectively Professor and Dr?

The form Mr & Mrs (or Ms) gives way to Dr & Mrs, or Professor & Mrs, or The Rev'd and Mrs, where the lady is a traditionalist who does not have a profession of her own, and stays at home ...
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0answers
46 views

How should I include names which are written in non-Latin scripts in a list of software authors?

I have a list of the authors of a software program, some of whose contributors are from such places as China and Russia. I would like to include both their transliterated Latin-script names and their ...
6
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3answers
332 views

What word describes languages that are written left-to-right, top-to-bottom?

I am trying to describe the set of languages that, like English, are written left to right, and was trying "romanized", but "romanized" describes transliteration to a different set of characters, such ...
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1answer
413 views

Using a name as a contraction with “is”, syntax looks possessive?

"Bob is fat" Would it be proper to do "Bob's fat"? To me, this looks possessive, as if we're talking about his fat rather than using "fat" as an adjective. What's the proper way to do this?
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2answers
235 views

In what order should you say people's names?

I know that when you include someone, you say their name first. For example: "John and I went to the beach" How do you order the names when there are more than one additional people? For example: ...
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1answer
65 views

“Knows an awful lot about the Dark Arts, Snape”

He teaches Potions, but he doesn't want to—everyone knows he's after Quirrell's job. Knows an awful lot about the Dark Arts, Snape. From time to time I stumble upon this type of speech with ...
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1answer
61 views

Are roller coasters proper names?

I want to write a sentence like this: I look up at the new roller coaster they built called Superman. Superman is the name of the roller coaster. Do I need to do anything special with the name? for ...
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2answers
272 views

Why does a company's name spelled like a name, even if it's spelled differently in its logo? [closed]

There are companies which spell their name in their logo in a non standard way, specifically in all caps or all lower case. Some examples are: Intel Acer Yahoo! Yet, when their names are ...
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2answers
586 views

How do I pronounce the name “Aurelius”?

I was reading a book out-loud and came across this name. At the time, I pronounced it Aurelius: ur-ell-ee-us The more I think about it, the more I'm sure it is not correct. The word Aura would ...