Questions regarding morphemes (smallest semantically meaningful units in a language) such as words, affixes, parts of speech, intonation/stress, or implied context.

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“restaurant” has 1 or 2 morphemes?

Morpheme: The smallest unit of meaning that a word can be divided into The word ‘like’ contains one morpheme but ‘un-like-ly’ contains three.Source The word "restaurant" /ˈres.tə.rɑːnt/ has 1 or 2 ...
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0answers
30 views

Is it ok to use the verb “stickify” as startup name (as derivative from “sticker”)? [closed]

Is it correct to use the verb "stickify" as derivative from the noun "sticker" as a startup name? (I mean does it sounds ok/normal/typical for English-speaking people?) We are going to produce custom ...
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1answer
39 views

Morphology and syntax

Can you explain the definition of free and bound base in term of morphology and give me some examples. I do not understand
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0answers
85 views

How did 'how' + 'ever' = 'however' ⟹ 'but'?

[ OED: ] Etymology: < how adv. + ever adv. 8e. Qualifying a sentence or clause as a whole: For all that, nevertheless, notwithstanding; yet; = but at the beginning of the sentence. ...
2
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1answer
42 views

Correct morphological parse of a word “indecipherable”

What will be the correct morphological parse of word indecipherable in-prefix>decipher-stem>able-suffix or indecipherable in-prefix>de- prefix >cipher-stem>able-suffix ...
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0answers
66 views

From where do new English words come? [closed]

There are, always, new editions of well-known English dictionaries updated with new English words, therefore, what are the sources of these new English words? Please, be as clear as possible, and use ...
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0answers
112 views

What are the morphemes in the word “imaginative”?

What are the morphemes in the word "imaginative" and what are their functions? I'm studying morphology, and I know the general types of morphemes in words. Every morpheme has a meaning that changes ...
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2answers
97 views

Other special hyphenation examples than eight-teen

According to The TeXbook [Don Knuth, 1984], solution to Exercise 14.8, the word eighteen should be hyphenated eight-teen. It is, indeed, standard practice in pre-reform German to contract triple ...
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3answers
185 views

Is “exceptioned” a word?

The question is a little more complex than the title states. Exceptioned is not in the dictionary. But I am not trying to use this as a verb. I work in IT. We keep a list of exceptioned words that we ...
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2answers
304 views

Strong /strɔːŋ/ → stronger /strɔːŋɡər/ - Why do we have to put an extra /g/ in front of /ər/? Is it a rule?

Ok, see this in the dictionary: Strong /strɔːŋ/ --> Stronger /strɔːŋɡər/ Why do we have to put an extra /g/ in front of /ər/? But "/sing" /sɪŋ/ & "/singer" /ˈsɪŋər/ do not adhere to that rule. ...
2
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1answer
163 views

When can/can't you add “-less” at the end of a word?

When can or can't you add -less at the end of a word? What are the limitations to its productivity? Can you say anything at all, like streakless or phoneless? I am really sorry for the stupid ...
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2answers
135 views

Is “testes” an inflectional reduplication?

I was supposed to ask this question 1 year ago and it is based on a discussion in this question that I answered: What is a word called that consists of a repetition of one word? I gave testes as an ...
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2answers
69 views

Morphological analysis of the formation of unhappier

I am an English student from Austria and have a question concerning morphology. In the reading I did for one of my introductory courses on linguistics there was a chapter on the analysis of ...
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2answers
525 views

No, not, and non [closed]

Is there a specific rule, or set of rules, that can be followed to know when to use each word? I have noticed that not is usually used with a verb, but I think that there sometimes are exceptions ...
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4answers
165 views

What is the adjectival form of “place”? [closed]

Space is to spatial as place is to what adjective?
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3answers
105 views

What verb describes divisive behavior?

I can't find a proper verb corresponding to the adjective divisive. If a person is divisive, then can I also say that they "divide other people apart"? Is there a verb for divisive?
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1answer
64 views

Modifying a word in its structure (spelling) to convey a different meaning?

Somewhere on the Internet I read the following lines: Daughter is not equal to tensions. Daughter is equal to ten-sons. In this sentence the word "tension" is modified to be written as ...
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1answer
112 views

Antonym of 'helper'?

This is my question. If 'helper' means 'someone who helps', then what is 'someone who got helped'? Whom does the helper help? Is there any term to define it? Thanks!
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2answers
127 views

Verbal analogy: sweet _ness_ is to suffix as boat _swain_ is to … In other words, what is the term for the _swain_ morpheme?

At some point in the past I encountered the following verbal analogy: SWEET NESS : SUFFIX :: BOAT SWAIN : ? In my view, the question is asking what one would term the "swain" morpheme in ...
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1answer
385 views

How many monosyllabic words does English have? (estimations are fine)

I'm writing a post about word length in various languages in the world. It seems that English have (relatively) a lot of one-syllable words. Is there a count or an estimate of how many one-syllable ...
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3answers
201 views

Do the words 'poster' and 'mixer' have one or two morphemes?

The words 'Driver', 'writer' and 'player' are composed of base and -er morpheme, which have the meaning of the one who writes or drives..., whereas 'mixer' doesn't mean the one who mixes, does it mean ...
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3answers
214 views

Why Greek morphemes over Latin, or Latin over Greek? *A Call to Lexicographers*

Is there a rationale behind why certain English words take Greek morphemes (or affixes) over Latin morphemes, and vice versa? Why do certain Greek morphemes become standard English idiom over Latin ...
4
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1answer
167 views

What is the need of an invisible affix?

When nothing means something: In morpheme-based morphology, a null morpheme is a morpheme that is realized by a phonologically null affix (an empty string of phonological segments). In simpler ...
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4answers
311 views

Why is “omnipotent” stressed iambically?

"Omnipotent" is stressed like omˈnipotent, with a stress on second syllable. But both components are stressed on the first syllable ('omni and 'potent). And a comparable word, "omnipresent", has the ...
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3answers
242 views

Base/root of increment and decrement

I'm tasked with a morphological analysis of incrementing. I would say that crement is the base of increment and the root of the word. But I'm curious, because all my life I've been thinking about ...
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1answer
2k views

Why is “coon” a word?

The word formation process that yielded the word coon is called (fore-)clipping: raccoon > coon Other examples of fore-clipping include: bot (robot), chute (parachute), roach (cockroach), coon ...
4
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1answer
187 views

Morphology of mobster, gangster, webster, hipster

Where the letter "t" came from in these words? Is it part of the suffix -ter- or a separate suffix? Where the "s" comes from? Can other words on -ster be formed this way?
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2answers
99 views

How common are adjectives on -ly?

How common in English are adjectives ending with -ly? I can remember only "stately" and "unruly". Is it adequate to assume, say in machine text analysis, that apart from several predefined exceptions ...
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2answers
191 views

What's the origin of the demonym Thai?

I was curious why we called people from Thailand "Thai" and those from Taiwan "Taiwanese." The latter by itself is a bit less surprising, though. See also: Are there any rules governing what we call ...
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0answers
132 views

Morphemic versus phonemic approach to teaching the many sounds of “ou”

Is there a way I can explain the many sounds of the phoneme "ou" using the morphemic structure of words instead of the phonemic way?
2
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3answers
207 views

Compounds and Phrases

What is the difference between compounds and phrases? How do I know that "watch-maker" is a compound but "steel bridge" is a phrase? Does the "head" have anything to do with it (complement-head or ...
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4answers
497 views

What is the nominal form of the verb “to give”?

Normally one can add -tion or -ation to a verb to make it nominal, but that nominalization doesn't work for "give". Is there a nominalized form of "to give"? If not, is there a word that could serve ...
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3answers
3k views

“Sometimes”, “oftentimes” — is there a -times word for “very rarely”?

If something happens sometimes, it happens occasionally. If something happens oftentimes, it happens often. Is there an equivalent word for something happening very rarely?
2
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1answer
633 views

When do I use non-, ir-/i-, dis-, a-, or un-?

Between using the prefixes non-, ir-, i-, and dis-, a-, or un-, meaning "not (root word) to do something", when is the best time to use each?
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3answers
742 views

Is there a general rule for which types of nouns end in -archy vs. -cracy?

Why do we use democracy vs. demarchy and anarchy vs. anocracy?
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2answers
771 views

“tube” vs. “tubing”

I have always run into word twins like tube vs. tubing. More pairs: fence vs. fencing, pipe vs. piping, cable vs. cabling, rail vs. railing, etc. This is an interesting phemonenon. Most of these ...
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4answers
474 views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. ...
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2answers
769 views

Are there many words that come with “a” as the prefix to mean “no, non” like “asymptomatic” and “apolitical”?

I didn’t know the word, “asymptomatic” to my shame, until I heard the following narration in AP Radio news aired on October 27 through AFN network: “Dr. Anthony Fauci with the NIH says CDC ...
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1answer
162 views

What kind of morphemes do you call -ish and -y? How would you describe their function?

In the context of neologisms and/or teenspeak: e.g. soon-ish, tumblr-y
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3answers
532 views

The horribility of English language

Pretty much every adjective that ends in the suffix -able or -ible gives rise to a related noun: corruptible becomes corruptibility mutable becomes mutability respectable becomes respectability ...
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1answer
82 views

The word foresaw and its morphemes

I need help with the word foresaw. I know that the morphemes for foresaw are {fore} and {saw} but what kind of morpehmes are they (derivational/inflection) and what are their category and function
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0answers
29 views

“Jesus is a coming” - what's the exact grammatical role of the “a” before the gerund? [duplicate]

I've noticed that in the common use of English, namely in songs, there is also an extra redundant(?) "a" before a gerund, such as in a gospel song I heard Jesus is a coming (this particular ...
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3answers
2k views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
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1answer
185 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [closed]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
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3answers
259 views

“Silence” and “silently”: What is the name of the relation between these words?

Consider: Silence is a noun. Silent is an adjective. Silently is an adverb. Silence! is an interjection. Not sure how these words actually evolved, but they were likely all derived from the noun ...
2
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2answers
211 views

“Stadiums” vs. “stadia” [duplicate]

I'm not that old, but when I was a child/teen, stadia was the common term. As in: Wembley, the Nou Camp, and the Santiago Bernabeu are football stadia. The MCG and Lord's are cricket stadia. ...
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2answers
190 views

“Napoleon complex” or “Napoleonic complex”? [closed]

Which is correct: "he has a Napoleon complex" or "he has a Napoleonic complex"?
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1answer
209 views

What it the morphological classification of the ending -ump? [duplicate]

Can someone tell me how to classify the morpheme -ump, such as can be combined with lump,slump, bump, etc. (It's for a research I'm doing on onomatopoeia.) thanks
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1answer
1k views

Usage of the noun suffix “-ment”

What is a good rule for the usage of the noun suffix -ment? Is desirement as acceptable as achievement?
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1answer
209 views

“Oriented” vs. “orientated” [duplicate]

I couldn't help but add an additional frame of reference. Though I personally find the utterance of "orientated" to be a failed attempt at the proper word "oriented", the collective commentary is ...