0
votes
2answers
50 views

How to best correct ambiguity of “in the room next to me”?

A common construction in English is: There is a person in the room next to me. However, this is ambiguous because it’s unclear whether the person is in a separate room that happens to be ...
2
votes
1answer
203 views

“Of which many” vs “many of which” as parenthetical modifiers

The houses on Canal street, of which many had been damaged in the storm, looked abandoned. Is the modifier "of which many... storm" correct? I know that "on canal street" is a prepositional ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is this sentence grammatical and punctuated correctly?

Does this sentence need to be broken up by a semi colon, conjuction, or a period? Is there a modifier error here as well? The peasants were the least free of all people, bound by tradition and ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

“Huge potential profit” vs. “huge profit potential”

What is the proper usage — "huge potential profit" or "huge profit potential"?
1
vote
3answers
540 views

The placement of “only” in a sentence with perfect continuous tense and “been”

I was just wondering if there is a significant difference between placing "only" before and after the word "been". Examples: I've only been fixing cars since I was young. vs I've been only ...
0
votes
1answer
339 views

“User's expertise” or “user expertise”?

What is the correct form when referring to the expertise of a user (e.g. in programming, writing)? user's expertise user expertise
1
vote
2answers
18k views

Are “way better” and “way more” correct?

"Way better" and "way more" are popular expressions, but they both seem incorrect to me. "Far better", "far more", "much better", and "much more" all seem correct. Is this true? If so, why?
4
votes
2answers
428 views

Use of “although” with a modifier

Is it grammatically correct to use "although" in a modifying clause, but without a conjugated verb? Example: Although not regarded as nocturnal, the Black Bear of North America is active at night ...
3
votes
1answer
217 views

Can one be *highly* ambivalent?

I've always felt that it's something of a contradiction to be very or highly ambivalent. It's grammatically correct, as far as I know, but is it stylistically acceptable, or is my sense of linguistic ...