Questions about modifiers.

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1answer
28 views

Help with a modifier: “Combined”

I am hoping for some help with the following statement from a construction contract: The amounts of all subcontracts, provided that such amounts shall include a maximum of 10% mark-up for overhead ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Question about “put not your”

An exercise asked me to rearrange the sentence, "Put your money not in trust," such that there is no ambiguity to its meaning. At first glance I thought that "Put not your trust in money" sounded ...
0
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3answers
64 views

“Terrified, John locked the door” — Is the comma necessary?

Which one would sound better? Terrified, John locked the door and switched off the lights. OR Terrified John locked the door and switched off the lights.
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2answers
47 views

“Napoleon complex” or “Napoleonic complex”? [closed]

Which is correct: "he has a Napoleon complex" or "he has a Napoleonic complex"?
1
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1answer
66 views

Degrees of comparison for words ending in “-ly”

Would you make a word ending in -ly positive, comparative, or superlative? I'm sort of leaning towards positive at the moment, and if the answer is positive, would you put more and most for ...
2
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1answer
70 views

“Of which many” vs “many of which” as parenthetical modifiers

The houses on Canal street, of which many had been damaged in the storm, looked abandoned. Is the modifier "of which many... storm" correct? I know that "on canal street" is a prepositional ...
2
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2answers
67 views

What's the difference between a dangling modifier and a gerund phrase?

This was the first sentence of a New York Times article: Petro O. Poroshenko, a pro-European billionaire confectioner, was sworn in on Saturday as the fifth president of Ukraine, promising to put an ...
2
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1answer
49 views

judging the intended meaning of the two sentences below

james is max's supposedly Irish ancestor. james is max's supposed Irish ancestor. what can we interpret from these? which is the correct one? I understand that "supposedly" modifies the adjective ...
43
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12answers
5k views

Does “so called” have a negative connotation in English?

In some languages the literal translation of "so called" usually has a neutral connotation. E.g. in the Czech language you may very often find a sentence like this (literally translated from a Czech ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Is a participial phrase at the end of a sentence a dangling modifier?

In this sentence: John walked outside, carrying a jug of water. Is "carrying a jug of water" dangling? If it isn't, what about the sentence: John walked to the car, carrying a jug of water. ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Dangling modifier in Style Guide?

When writing English, Strunk & White apply. Am I the only one who sees a dangling modifier here? It may be borderline, but how close to the border? In "strict mode", my ears hear: ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Absolute Phrase and 'With'

I've been reading up on absolute phrases recently, and I was wondering if the following construction is grammatically correct: "Jared went to bed with a lot on his mind, each thought brimming with ...
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2answers
94 views

What part of speech is “run”?

A JobInstance refers to the concept of a logical job run. In the above sentence, is the final word "run" a noun? and which word does the adjective "logical" modify? job or job run? Is the word "job ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Participles Modifying Direct Objects

Here's a simple question: Is is possible for a participle -- past or present -- to modify a direct object? "You deserve every ounce of respect garnered." Is this correct? My reasoning is based on the ...
1
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1answer
53 views

order of modifiers

A result of two tables JOIN'ed is a cartesian product of the tables to which a filter is applied which selects only those rows with joining columns matching. In the above sentence, which word does ...
0
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1answer
94 views

How to properly identify adverbial modifiers? [closed]

I do not fully understand what they mean by structure of the adverbial modifier or type. Does 'type' mean the question it answers i.e. where, when, how? Below I listed the adverbial modifiers which ...
0
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2answers
41 views

“the below-identified person”: Term for this style and any style guides regarding

Are there any technical terms to specifically describe the two styles (A and B) below? Also, are there any prescriptive style guides that say which is preferable? My own preference is for style B ...
0
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2answers
44 views

Are absolute phrases adverbials?

Can we say all absolute phrases function as "adverbials" modifying the subject+verb of the sentence that they are attached to? For example: Her determination stronger than ever, Nexisa resolved ...
-1
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1answer
52 views

“Any salary or compensation or experience certificate” vs. “any salary certificate or compensation certificate or experience certificate”

How should I write this? ... shall not be eligible for any salary or compensation or experience certificate if the Trainee fails to co-operate with XYZ for the exit formalities ... shall not ...
4
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1answer
99 views

Grammar question about modifiers

I'm not sure if this statement is grammatically correct. It sounds fine, but I'm not sure if the 'with the...' part is right. With the end of the Great War came a great revolution in the ...
2
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2answers
72 views

Meaning of “Just So Stories”

What does "Just So" mean as in the "Just So Stories"? Sometimes "Just So" might mean "just right", but that makes no sense here.
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3answers
68 views

“In [noun] terms” vs. “in terms of [noun]”

What are the differences in meaning between the followings? In society terms In terms of society
3
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2answers
1k views

Is this sentence grammatical and punctuated correctly?

Does this sentence need to be broken up by a semi colon, conjuction, or a period? Is there a modifier error here as well? The peasants were the least free of all people, bound by tradition and ...
0
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2answers
48 views

“Huge potential profit” vs. “huge profit potential”

What is the proper usage — "huge potential profit" or "huge profit potential"?
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2answers
154 views

Differences between “very” and “very much” as adjective modifiers

The following examples are clearly wrong: × I am very much tired × She is very much clever But the following sounds fine (at least according to OALD): I am very much afraid that ... I am ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Modifier clause question?

In the following sentence, what parts are incorrect or ungrammatical? (GMAT related) The new “e-waste” salvage company collects electronic waste items, such as old cellular telephones and broken ...
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2answers
94 views

Proofreading / Grammar question [closed]

I would like to know what the correct answer to this question is, which has me stumped despite doing some research: The only thing I can think of is to go with b. and use 'extreme nut allergy' ...
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0answers
20 views

Words delimiter or word delimiter? [duplicate]

I'm writing a documentation on our product and I want to write this sentence correctly: "The word(s) delimiter can either be comma or space". Which is correct? (Excuse me, I'm not a naive speaker) ...
0
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1answer
98 views

Is this an example of a dangling modifier too?

"From an original focus on the oil industry, Platts gradually expanded its purview to include metals, shipping, and all energy-related markets - oil, coal, natural gas, electricity, nuclear power, ...
1
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2answers
684 views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
4
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1answer
42 views

Isn't this a dangling something?

As one of the busiest times of year, people will share moments, plan for the festivities and search for the perfect gift, every single day — on Facebook. And this year, it will truly be a mobile ...
1
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3answers
399 views

Correct use of hyphens in “we offer same day, on site service calls”

What would be the correct hyphenation (if any) for the following sentence? We offer same day, on site service calls. I was thinking of hyphenating "on-site", but I cannot think why "same day" ...
2
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1answer
330 views

adverbs modifying noun phrases and licensing their own complements

[i] Harry looked down at his empty gold plate. He had only just realized how hungry he was. The pumpkin pasties seemed ages ago. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) [ii] Albus Dumbledore ...
2
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2answers
149 views

Can you use “Goldilocks” as an adjective?

Space professionals have popularized the terms Goldilocks planet & Goldilocks zone to describe planets and regions of space around a star that, like earth, are "just right" to conceivably harbor ...
0
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1answer
163 views

Is “responsible” a gradable or a non-gradable adjective?

Is responsible a gradable adjective that can be modified with too? E.g., "He is too responsible".
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3answers
128 views

What is the term for a word that alters the degree or severity of the subsequent word?

What is the term for a word that alters the degree or severity of the subsequent word? In the example below, what is the term for "somewhat"? Ex: He was somewhat unhappy.
1
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1answer
307 views

Last I checked, we put commas after appositive phrases

The Official SAT Study Guide, Second Edition's second practice test's writing section contains the following question, with the objective to choose the answer that is most correct. Through his ...
1
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1answer
53 views

Is shipping included? (missing modifier, serial comma usage)

I'm not sure if there is a clear answer to this. Is the "collect & return delivery cost" included in the $15 fee or is it impossible to tell? Could it be fixed with a serial comma? "All ...
1
vote
3answers
934 views

Noun-adjective-noun: Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle?

Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle as in the following examples? car new tires salad high-calorie dressing house external wall nitrogen fine droplets These examples ...
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2answers
330 views

Can the word “hair” be used in a sentence without any adjective modifying it?

Our teacher of linguistics gave us this example: "the beautiful girl has got a long dark hair" and said that "beautiful" was a necessary complement, and that "long", "dark" and "hair" were ...
4
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3answers
7k views

Should “two weeks vacation” be “two weeks' vacation” (possessive)?

I've always understood that the phrase "two weeks" usually turns to "two weeks'" when used as a modifier -- as in "I'm giving my two weeks' notice" or "I get two weeks' vacation" ("two weeks' holiday" ...
2
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2answers
335 views

Plural noun with singular modifiers [duplicate]

I am writing up a document for an art exhibit and have found myself a bit confused. The piece in question is a lidded jar with a stand and handle. The sentence in question is as follows: Worthy ...
1
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3answers
466 views

The placement of “only” in a sentence with perfect continuous tense and “been”

I was just wondering if there is a significant difference between placing "only" before and after the word "been". Examples: I've only been fixing cars since I was young. vs I've been only ...
5
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3answers
465 views

Why is it “rough-looking” instead of “roughly looking”?

I’ve noticed recently that certain constructions with present active participles (meaning, -ing forms acting adjectivally) prefer to be modified by adjectives rather than by adverbs. For example, ...
1
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1answer
138 views

Can the adjective phrase ‘so powerful’ be a postmodifier?

When I saw this sentence first, I thought so powerful to be an objective complement. [ ‘so powerful’ is the result of ‘make’] But now, it may be more reasonable to think ‘so powerful’ is modifying ‘a ...
0
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1answer
126 views

Is this an absolute phrase?

In the following example, is more full picture a kind of absolute phrase? He has given us a lot, more full picture of dinosaurs of the East Coast.
2
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2answers
952 views

“On or off campus” vs. “On- or off-campus” vs. “On-campus or off-campus”

It does not matter if a student lives __ as ... I'm writing a formal report. Which of the following should I use to fill in the blank? Which one is correct and more formal and looks/sounds ...
8
votes
5answers
374 views

Nationality modifier vs. Language modifier

"Chinese writer Mo Yan wins Nobel literature prize" (USA Today) "Chinese author Mo Yan wins Nobel Prize for Literature" (BBC) Q. Are we to understand that Mo Yan wrote in Chinese, that he was a ...
10
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3answers
1k views

Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase

Does "non-" prefixed to a two word phrase permit another hyphen before the second word? If I want to refer to an entity which is defined as the negation of another entity by attaching "non-" it seems ...
2
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2answers
89 views

Article word referencing problem

I often have problem with hanging modifiers. In the sentence: This project's vision follows from its predecessor's. Is the reference "its" referring to the project or the vision? My intention is ...