Modal verbs (such as can, could, shall, should, will, would, may, might, and must) combine with verbs in the bare infinitive to express information about the verb such as possibility or necessity.

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Why is the past tense of “may”, “might”?

Why is the past tense of may, might? When you see other past forms of auxiliary verbs, they usually have -ould, like should, could, and would. Unlike other forms, the past tense of may is might not ...
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Stress on “can” and “could”

I can go there. I could go there. In these sentences, when spoken, how is the meaning altered by putting stress/emphasis on the words can and could?
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Why is “that would be me” more certain than “that is me”?

I have been reading these two posts on would: Why "that would be me"? (part 1) & Why "that would be me"? (part 2) If you want a domestic SUV, then the best choice would be the Ford Escape ...
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Meaning of the term “empty use” in the context of modal verbs

I'm reading a book titled Comprehensive High School English Grammar & Composition. The author, who is Indian, says this on the use of the modal verbs can and could: Can is used to express ...
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How does one correctly use the 'verb + infinitive' construction?

Which option is correct? I want add something. I want to add something. If there is a general rule, please describe it. If you know how to better name the topic, propose your own version.
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Is “You must have cleaned the room by 9 o'clock tomorrow” epistemic or deontic?

"You must have cleaned the room by 9 o'clock tomorrow" Is must epistemic or deontic here? I think it might be epistemic because of the use of the perfect aspect (have cleaned), but it sounds ...
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121 views

“May have been” : sequence of tenses

Let us suppose we have such a sentence: John says Marry may have fallen ill. How should we change the sentence if we talk about the past? Is it correct? John said Marry might have fallen ...
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114 views

Contracting “I should have” to “I'd've”

I know that for "I would have" the contraction "I’d have" or "I’d’ve" is a lot more frequently used in everyday conversation. But is the same true for "I should have"? Is "I’d've" also prefered?