A mnemonic ( /nəˈmɒnɨk/, with a silent "m"), or mnemonic device, is any learning technique that aids memory.

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Mnemonic for 'onomatopoeia'? [closed]

It's hard to remember its spelling because it has so many syllables, I often say it as 'on-na-ma-to-pee-a'... and even if I pronounce it correctly, the last few letters are a nightmare for me. Is ...
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3answers
96 views

Mnemonic for spelling 'anonymous'?

I have difficulties spelling anonymous because I have trouble remembering how to even say it. Is there an easy way to remember its spelling?
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6answers
419 views

Ways to Memorize “Discreet” and “Discrete” [closed]

I have a question about discreet and discrete. People tend to get these two words mixed up, and I would like to help them memorize these two words. Discrete: unconnected; separate Discreet: ...
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1answer
5k views

Is There a Way to Remember Nouns, Verbs & Adjectives [closed]

Is there a simple and concise way to remember nouns, adjectives and verbs aside from poems? I am aware of a number of poems available to aid memory, but I am looking for something a lot more simple. ...
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3answers
170 views

Mnemonic for “complement / compliment”

This is the only similar spelling mix-up in English that gets me every freakin' time. I can never remember which is which. One is a mathematical notion; the other is a nice thing to say. Does anyone ...
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1answer
277 views

Using the FANBOYS “for” in a series

I have a sentence that is constructed the same as this one: She bought food for a black cat, a white horse, a red dog, and a green frog. However, I feel the comma does not give enough pause for ...
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2answers
173 views

words for numbers

Since words are easier to remember than numbers, you construct a word from each group of numbers and then memorize the word(s) I would like to learn numbers by words, for example: 1=apple 2=red ...
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2answers
339 views

What's the history of the mnemonic “Father Charles goes down and ends battle”

If you work your way around the 'circle of fifths' you work your may through all the major scales. For example, starting with C major if we add one sharp, F#, we get G major. Adding a second sharp, ...
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4answers
410 views

A sensible mnemonic for “pseudo” [closed]

Whenever I go to use the pseudo- prefix, I always have to pause for a moment and decide what the correct e-u order is. Often times I get it wrong. Built in typo correction frequently helps, though ...
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7answers
2k views

Simple sentences that demonstrate differences among similar-looking words [closed]

While searching online for the difference between "sometime" and "some time", I stumbled upon this page. At the middle of the page you can see these two sentences that demonstrate the difference: ...
5
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6answers
669 views

Helper: loose vs. lose

Does anyone have a good way of remembering when to choose lose instead of loose? I often find myself mistakenly using loose in emails and such when I really mean lose (which, in my mind, should be ...
8
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6answers
11k views

What's an easy way to remember when to use “affect” or “effect”?

Is there an easy way to remember when to use the word affect or effect in a sentence? It is very confusing, and I still get them mixed up.
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3answers
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What words have “‑ei‑” (except in “‑cei‑”) pronounced [i:]?

The rule is that written ei is pronounced [i:] only after the letter c — or that what is pronounced [i:] is written ei after the letter c only. Here are exceptions I’ve found so far: foreign ...
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11answers
3k views

Mnemonic for remembering how to spell “mnemonic”

It is ironic that the name of a mental device which is supposed to make our lives easier is itself so hard to spell. Is there a mnemonic for the spelling of mnemonic?