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2
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1answer
77 views

Shakespare's Scansion: Elision: half-solved

This is, hopefully, the end of the saga: the third installment of the Shakesperean scansion series. The first two can be found here: Shakespeare's Scansion Shakespeare's Scansion: the Sequel I've ...
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1answer
49 views

Yet Another (harmless) Shakespeare Question: Scansion

He was very fond of his pet words, some of which might seem oddly useless to some readers UNLESS scansion is considered. Specifically, "doth," "did," and "most" crop up with astounding frequency when ...
0
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1answer
101 views

Is there an English translation of Dante's “Divine Comedy” that mirrors the original's meter?

I know it would be extremely difficult to write anything in English using the Terza Rima and following the same rhyme pattern as feminine rhymes (the ones in which the penultimate syllable is stressed)...
0
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1answer
56 views

Term for when a rhyming word is unspoken? [duplicate]

I was watching a cartoon and part way through a song came on, and it had these two stanzas: Why do you have to look up to her Aside from in a literal sense? Don't you know that a power that ...
6
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2answers
157 views

In what mode does Tom Bombadil sing?

In J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings (book 1 of "The Fellowship of the Ring", chapter 7, "In the House of Tom Bombadil", specifically) the character Tom Bombadil sings many of his lines (much of ...
3
votes
2answers
510 views

Shakespeare and Maths: Metre and Completeness

Shakespearian sonnets have a particular structure where each line of the poem contains ten syllables (due to the use of iambic pentameter). This is, one might think, because ten sounds 'complete' to ...
0
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2answers
76 views

“I will meet” anapest substitute

I have the following song verse, which needs to be composed in Anapest (unaccented unaccented accented): I will meet (i-WILL-meet) Annabelle (an-nuh-BELLE) In my dreams (in-my-DREAMS) What would ...
3
votes
1answer
195 views

Is “GPS” a molossus?

It seems to me that "GPS", "FBI", "SMS", and other three-syllable initialisms are examples of molossus, or words with three equally stressed syllables. Are they? (I've never been good at scansion).
1
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1answer
470 views

Iambic Tetrameter?

God and my right shall me defend. I have said this motto a fair few times in my head a number of times and it seems as though iambic tetrameter is the meter that fits best The way I see it is, god ...
2
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1answer
449 views

Meter in Clare's “I am”

I've determined that almost all of John Clare's "I am" is in iambic pentameter. But I'm having trouble identifying the meter of the following line: But the vast shipwreck of my life's esteems My ...
27
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4answers
3k views

Why don’t we write poetry like Beowulf any longer?

Beowulf, the Old English epic poem, uses a characteristically Germanic style of poetry in which the number of strong beats per line is what counts. Instead of counting syllables, strong beats alone ...
1
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1answer
548 views

Meter in Tennyson's *Maud*

How should Tennyson's Maud be read? I.e. what is its meter? Here are the first four lines: I HATE the dreadful hollow behind the little wood, Its lips in the field above are dabbled with blood-...
2
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2answers
5k views

How does one tell the difference between long and short syllables?

Currently in the process of playing with Limericks and the meter they use usually requires a meter of long followed by two short syllables or vice versa. My question, how do you differentiate? Is it ...
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4answers
2k views

Why do we say 'commentator' instead of 'commenter'?

Another thread addresses the Englishness of the words. My question is different and a lot more convoluted: I hope I can make it plain and simple. I. There are straightforward nouns of action and ...
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7answers
5k views

Is it true that iambic pentameter is “natural” to English? If so, why?

When I first read Dante's Divine Comedy in high school, I remember once being puzzled at what I thought were strained rhymes in the translation, and mentioned it to my English teacher. In reply, she ...