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2answers
38 views

Is this a proper use of “diagnostician”?

Just a touch of background, this is for a button label in a piece of software. A user presses the button in order to choose the type/specialty of the health care provider that diagnosed them with an ...
-1
votes
2answers
29 views

If not immunized [closed]

Meningococcal Vaccine Note: If not immunized, participant may sign a waiver declining this vaccination. What exactly does this mean? (english not my first language) Is it saying that I dont need to ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

Foods that “insult” the body

How common is the word insult in the sense "[cause] bodily injury/trauma" in modern day English? Is it chiefly medical speak, or has it spread into general print that even the layperson knows what it ...
0
votes
2answers
164 views

How to refer to someone who has depression(A noun for someone who has depression)?

What do we call a person who is suffering from depression? Usually I hear "X has depression" but can I say *"X is a 'depressive'"? I have heard the word depressive used as a noun before; but I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Acronym within an acronym, academic writing

I'm preparing a manuscript for publication in a medical journal about Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). I understand that I have to define the acronym IBD once, when first used in the text (...
1
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3answers
171 views

Alzheimer disease or Alzheimer's disease?

What is the proper spelling: Alzheimer or Alzheimer's Disease?
2
votes
2answers
457 views

What do you call a “schizophrenia attack”?

Attack as in panic attack. I don't know the term for it.
1
vote
1answer
174 views

“First aid kit” or “medicine box” for home use? [closed]

What term is more widespread and suitable when we speak about box with medicines you keep at home on a regular basis? Every family has such box, where you store necessary medicines, bandages, syringes ...
0
votes
3answers
115 views

What do you call the first doctor that a patient meets?

Usually when a person is infected by a disease, they will first visit a nearly hospital or dispensary. In medical terms the first doctor he meets is called something specific. I remember this word ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

The meaning of the phrase “to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes”

I'm not exactly sure what this phrase mean: "the purpose of _ is to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes ..." My guess is that it means that _ increases the amount of time between episodes.
3
votes
4answers
83 views

Boarding-school for adults

In Russia we have special medical institutions something between psychiatric hospitals and boarding schools for adults. There are different departments for people with mental disorders and people with ...
0
votes
3answers
87 views

Expression for Yes/No/Unclear(?) in medical score-based diagnosis

This is a repost of a question in CrossValidated which received no attention. http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/169085/yes-no-unclear-count-score-based-decision-quest-for-terminology In ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Get your phalanges off me

In a movie I heard a character saying "Get your phalanges off me!" Why not "Get your fingers off me"? Is the speaker trying to sound impressive or well-learned? Thank you!
2
votes
2answers
91 views

A word or term to describe a person who feels pleasure in picking on one's skin

What do you call this behavior where gratification is felt when picking on one's or somebody's skin? I have this one friend who feels pleasure in doing such behavior when he is bored or nothing to do ...
1
vote
3answers
185 views

Single word to describe some tasks performed sequentially

I'm searching for a single word to describe a session made of independent tasks performed sequentially. For example when you go to a medical center (this is the context where it has to be used then ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the name of the disease when a person can see animals or humans that are not present?

I'm looking for answers other than Schizophrenia or Charles Bonnet syndrome. explanatory note: Growing up as a child, I could see certain different cats in my window that would even move ...
12
votes
4answers
853 views

Principles in the use of letters 'b', 'u' and 'v' in Early Modern English typography

I have been reading a medical book by one late surgeon Thomas Gale. I was wondering the following mix-up of letters 'u','v' and 'b'. This states: "to have the cure of". Letter 'u' is used in the ...
1
vote
2answers
226 views

Mystery word indicating a body part in a medical book published in 1563

The following title is written in a book by surgeon T. Gale published in 1563. I have trouble translating the last word: "Of woundes of the [x]". Mainly the second letter after "B" is blank for me, B?...
1
vote
1answer
661 views

Patient vs. subject in clinical research

What is the difference between patients and subjects, in clinical research? I read this paper abstract: The terms “patient” and “subject” are often used interchangeably when proposing, ...
3
votes
5answers
228 views

What to call a doctor who doesn't really cure their patient with their effort (to get more money from “repeat business”)?

Doctors Are Not “Only Out to Make Money” I read that article and can't get a good word for that kind of doctors, except the term doctors (who) are only out to make money in the second line of the ...
3
votes
4answers
75 views

(preferably clinical) name for awareness without discomfort

After an orthopedic injury, one often experiences the following trajectory, in order of increasing time since incurring the injury: pain: acute discomfort, often intermittent (e.g., when moving the ...
3
votes
4answers
386 views

What do you call an object inserted between two pieces (of bone)

Imagine someone has a broken bone and after removing any slivers there is a void between the two bone fragments. In order to assure that the bone grows back correctly, a piece is inserted between the ...
1
vote
6answers
725 views

What would be an appropriate word for a medicine that prevents Alzheimer's Disease?

Medicines that people take or give to their children and pets in the hope of preventing infectious diseases are called "vaccines", "immunizations", "inoculations", or "prophylactics". In discussing ...
2
votes
2answers
952 views

What does ct stand for in drugs?

What does "ct" stand for in the following product advertised by Wallmart: "Buy:ANY ONE (1) Dulcolax® Tablets 25ct+, Dulcolax® Suppositories 4ct+, Dulcolax Pink" http://wm6.walmart.com/MediaOMP/2014/...
1
vote
2answers
488 views

Word for eating things that aren't food

Is there a word for trying to eat things that aren't food? I'm thinking particularly in the context of babies, where it's a normal part of the learning process, but I dare say it is a disorder that ...
2
votes
3answers
242 views

What is the netting dressing for a deep cut called?

When there is a deep cut we use some sort of netting dressing to pull the sides of the skin together so the healing process is shorter and leaves no or smaller scars. What do we call it? Is it just "...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

Administer the patient the drug? Administer the patient with the drug?

Does the verb “administer”, as in to give a drug, work like the verb “give” or like the verb “provide”? Which of the following is better: 1 or 2? Patients are administered the drug. Like “...
4
votes
8answers
2k views

What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?

It's connected to a scientific paper for a public health topic. I need to name a patient's surrounding of caregivers which can include family members, friends, close relatives. I came up with a ...
1
vote
1answer
172 views

Name for the behavior of inappropiately hiding or misplacing objects

People with dementia may hide objects, or put objects in strange places, such as keys in the sugar. Is there a name for such erratic behaviour? The lexical field could include verbs such as "wandering"...
3
votes
2answers
163 views

What is a medical term for the belief that you're healthy when you're not? [duplicate]

What is a medical term, as in a mental or eating disorder, that means "a compulsion with being healthy, while actually being unhealthy," stemming primarily from a poor understanding of science, ...
2
votes
2answers
344 views

Why some blade is called “beaver blade” [closed]

I found the term beaver blade used in veterinary article. Could you please explain why the blade is called beaver blade: is it related to an animal, or something else? How does it related to the ...
0
votes
3answers
575 views

Which preposition is used with tolerance in this sentence?

I want to use the word tolerance in the context of infectious diseases. This sentence: The immune response will mediate either clearance or tolerance preposition infections. In other words, ...
2
votes
5answers
893 views

Best word for health problems

What is the best word for pain and health problems caused by a disease? I want to use it as term for a collection of symptoms, that I gather. For example: [headache, stomachache, nausea] but ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

Histonic cancer: Ok English? Or, Japanese English?

Histonic cancer Would this term be understood by English-speaking medical professionals? Google shows only 53 hits, and all are from Japanese or Chinese sites. If it is not natural English, ...
1
vote
1answer
135 views

What is the equivalent of “susceptibility” in medical literature, but to a healthy condition?

In medical literature the word susceptibility collocates with negative adjectives or nouns -- negative prosody. Likewise, the word predisposing factors or state is mostly associated with negative ...
4
votes
3answers
15k views

Medicine vs. Medication

I'm wrote some documentation in which I needed to refer to the list of drugs that a person was taking at a given time. This list might also include a dosage as well (e.g. 'Aspirin 300mg daily'). I ...
0
votes
1answer
135 views

What do you call a medical procedure that requires the patient to recover walking [closed]

For some medical operations its required to revalidate the patient because the procedure was so heavy he/ she had to lie down for 1 to 3 weeks with a completely paralysed lowerbody. After the patient ...
1
vote
2answers
109 views

Formal term for upper level health workers

What is the formal term for upper level healthcare workers? By "upper level" I mean Medical Doctors and pharmacists; basically the ones that must have a university degree to perform the duties. I'm ...
2
votes
5answers
3k views

Medical Equivalent of Disbarred

If a doctor loses his license to practice is there an equivalent word to disbarred? For example: That lawyer was disbarred The doctor was (medically disbarred).
0
votes
2answers
275 views

What is a better antonym pair than “upmost” vs. “deepest” for blood vessels?

I’m thinking about the opposite ends of a blood vessel, so perhaps the “upmost” blood vessels and “deepest” blood vessels. My problem is that I like neither word quoted in the previous sentence. ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Where does English get the word “condom” from?

Although once a word that dared not speak its name, thanks to popular-culture references as well as the devastating AIDS tragedy, condom seems to be on everyone’s lips these days. But does anybody ...
-2
votes
2answers
379 views

Difference between “illusion” and “delusion” [closed]

Can somebody please elaborate on the difference between illusion and delusion? Especially in medical terms.
1
vote
2answers
248 views

What is Mongolian Trait ? when referring to medical scores of a newborn child in USA [closed]

What is Mongolian Trait? I have been unable to find the meaning to this My Niece was classified as having Mongolian Trait ..
1
vote
2answers
582 views

When was the word “phobia” coined? [closed]

When was the word phobia coined? And how did the concept of naming different phobias come into existence?
-3
votes
4answers
1k views

What’s the male equivalent of “menopause”? [closed]

If women go through men-o-pause, do men go through women-o-pause? Is there an etymological equivalent? What is the antonymic Greek word to meno- (or rather, to μηνο-)? There might be a medical ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

what does operator-dependent mean in medical term?

I am writing paper on liver transplantation. And one of the term I came across is operator-dependent. Can someone help me understand it please? I got the definition below from this site. I still ...
2
votes
2answers
492 views

Medicine language: triage and color codes

I found that in many hospitals, in order to classify patients' health conditions, standard expressions like "code red", "code blue" etc. are used. These expressions do not follow the standard "order ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Regular/Routine, Fasting, Blood test/Blood work

I would like to expand my vocabulary with some medical terms in English. I have been thinking about how to say, for example, if I go to see a doctor for a blood test. Q1) Are these phrases correct? ...
5
votes
2answers
169 views

Is “sectio caesare” an appropriate English alternative to “caesarian section”?

On Parenting.se we recently received this question, which refers to sectio caesare birth. I was not familiar with the term, but found that wikipedia redirects the term to the caesarian section page. ...
10
votes
5answers
7k views

Medical term for deafness

Anosmia = Loss of the sense of smell Anopia = Blindness Anaesthesia/Anaphia = Loss of the sense of touch Ageusia = Loss of taste ? = Deafness I can't find an equivalent medical term for ...