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0
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3answers
46 views

Expression for Yes/No/Unclear(?) in medical score-based diagnosis

This is a repost of a question in CrossValidated which received no attention. http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/169085/yes-no-unclear-count-score-based-decision-quest-for-terminology In ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Get your phalanges off me

In a movie I heard a character saying "Get your phalanges off me!" Why not "Get your fingers off me"? Is the speaker trying to sound impressive or well-learned? Thank you!
2
votes
2answers
36 views

A word or term to describe a person who feels pleasure in picking on one's skin

What do you call this behavior where gratification is felt when picking on one's or somebody's skin? I have this one friend who feels pleasure in doing such behavior when he is bored or nothing to do ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Single word to describe some tasks performed sequentially

I'm searching for a single word to describe a session made of independent tasks performed sequentially. For example when you go to a medical center (this is the context where it has to be used then ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the name of the disease when a person can see animals or humans that are not present?

I'm looking for answers other than Schizophrenia or Charles Bonnet syndrome. explanatory note: Growing up as a child, I could see certain different cats in my window that would even move ...
11
votes
4answers
694 views

Principles in the use of letters 'b', 'u' and 'v' in Early Modern English typography

I have been reading a medical book by one late surgeon Thomas Gale. I was wondering the following mix-up of letters 'u','v' and 'b'. This states: "to have the cure of". Letter 'u' is used in the ...
1
vote
2answers
195 views

Mystery word indicating a body part in a medical book published in 1563

The following title is written in a book by surgeon T. Gale published in 1563. I have trouble translating the last word: "Of woundes of the [x]". Mainly the second letter after "B" is blank for me, ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Patient vs. subject in clinical research

What is the difference between patients and subjects, in clinical research? I read this paper abstract: The terms “patient” and “subject” are often used interchangeably when proposing, ...
3
votes
5answers
135 views

What to call a doctor who doesn't really cure their patient with their effort (to get more money from “repeat business”)?

Doctors Are Not “Only Out to Make Money” I read that article and can't get a good word for that kind of doctors, except the term doctors (who) are only out to make money in the second line of the ...
3
votes
4answers
65 views

(preferably clinical) name for awareness without discomfort

After an orthopedic injury, one often experiences the following trajectory, in order of increasing time since incurring the injury: pain: acute discomfort, often intermittent (e.g., when moving the ...
3
votes
4answers
311 views

What do you call an object inserted between two pieces (of bone)

Imagine someone has a broken bone and after removing any slivers there is a void between the two bone fragments. In order to assure that the bone grows back correctly, a piece is inserted between the ...
1
vote
6answers
286 views

What would be an appropriate word for a medicine that prevents Alzheimer's Disease?

Medicines that people take or give to their children and pets in the hope of preventing infectious diseases are called "vaccines", "immunizations", "inoculations", or "prophylactics". In discussing ...
2
votes
2answers
334 views

What does ct stand for in drugs?

What does "ct" stand for in the following product advertised by Wallmart: "Buy:ANY ONE (1) Dulcolax® Tablets 25ct+, Dulcolax® Suppositories 4ct+, Dulcolax Pink" ...
0
votes
2answers
239 views

Word for eating things that aren't food

Is there a word for trying to eat things that aren't food? I'm thinking particularly in the context of babies, where it's a normal part of the learning process, but I dare say it is a disorder that ...
1
vote
3answers
173 views

What is the netting dressing for a deep cut called?

When there is a deep cut we use some sort of netting dressing to pull the sides of the skin together so the healing process is shorter and leaves no or smaller scars. What do we call it? Is it just ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Administer the patient the drug? Administer the patient with the drug?

Does the verb “administer”, as in to give a drug, work like the verb “give” or like the verb “provide”? Which of the following is better: 1 or 2? Patients are administered the drug. Like ...
3
votes
8answers
1k views

What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?

It's connected to a scientific paper for a public health topic. I need to name a patient's surrounding of caregivers which can include family members, friends, close relatives. I came up with a ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Name for the behavior of inappropiately hiding or misplacing objects

People with dementia may hide objects, or put objects in strange places, such as keys in the sugar. Is there a name for such erratic behaviour? The lexical field could include verbs such as ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

What is a medical term for the belief that you're healthy when you're not? [duplicate]

What is a medical term, as in a mental or eating disorder, that means "a compulsion with being healthy, while actually being unhealthy," stemming primarily from a poor understanding of science, ...
2
votes
2answers
209 views

Why some blade is called “beaver blade” [closed]

I found the term beaver blade used in veterinary article. Could you please explain why the blade is called beaver blade: is it related to an animal, or something else? How does it related to the ...
0
votes
3answers
346 views

Which preposition is used with tolerance in this sentence?

I want to use the word tolerance in the context of infectious diseases. This sentence: The immune response will mediate either clearance or tolerance preposition infections. In other words, ...
2
votes
5answers
355 views

Best word for health problems

What is the best word for pain and health problems caused by a disease? I want to use it as term for a collection of symptoms, that I gather. For example: [headache, stomachache, nausea] but ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Histonic cancer: Ok English? Or, Japanese English?

Histonic cancer Would this term be understood by English-speaking medical professionals? Google shows only 53 hits, and all are from Japanese or Chinese sites. If it is not natural English, ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

What is the equivalent of “susceptibility” in medical literature, but to a healthy condition?

In medical literature the word susceptibility collocates with negative adjectives or nouns -- negative prosody. Likewise, the word predisposing factors or state is mostly associated with negative ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

Medicine vs. Medication

I'm wrote some documentation in which I needed to refer to the list of drugs that a person was taking at a given time. This list might also include a dosage as well (e.g. 'Aspirin 300mg daily'). I ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

What do you call a medical procedure that requires the patient to recover walking [closed]

For some medical operations its required to revalidate the patient because the procedure was so heavy he/ she had to lie down for 1 to 3 weeks with a completely paralysed lowerbody. After the patient ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

Formal term for upper level health workers

What is the formal term for upper level healthcare workers? By "upper level" I mean Medical Doctors and pharmacists; basically the ones that must have a university degree to perform the duties. I'm ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Medical Equivalent of Disbarred

If a doctor loses his license to practice is there an equivalent word to disbarred? For example: That lawyer was disbarred The doctor was (medically disbarred).
0
votes
2answers
241 views

What is a better antonym pair than “upmost” vs. “deepest” for blood vessels?

I’m thinking about the opposite ends of a blood vessel, so perhaps the “upmost” blood vessels and “deepest” blood vessels. My problem is that I like neither word quoted in the previous sentence. ...
6
votes
1answer
814 views

Where does English get the word “condom” from?

Although once a word that dared not speak its name, thanks to popular-culture references as well as the devastating AIDS tragedy, condom seems to be on everyone’s lips these days. But does anybody ...
-2
votes
2answers
251 views

Difference between “illusion” and “delusion” [closed]

Can somebody please elaborate on the difference between illusion and delusion? Especially in medical terms.
1
vote
2answers
203 views

What is Mongolian Trait ? when referring to medical scores of a newborn child in USA [closed]

What is Mongolian Trait? I have been unable to find the meaning to this My Niece was classified as having Mongolian Trait ..
1
vote
2answers
436 views

When was the word “phobia” coined? [closed]

When was the word phobia coined? And how did the concept of naming different phobias come into existence?
-3
votes
4answers
709 views

What’s the male equivalent of “menopause”? [closed]

If women go through men-o-pause, do men go through women-o-pause? Is there an etymological equivalent? What is the antonymic Greek word to meno- (or rather, to μηνο-)? There might be a medical ...
0
votes
1answer
789 views

what does operator-dependent mean in medical term?

I am writing paper on liver transplantation. And one of the term I came across is operator-dependent. Can someone help me understand it please? I got the definition below from this site. I still ...
2
votes
2answers
430 views

Medicine language: triage and color codes

I found that in many hospitals, in order to classify patients' health conditions, standard expressions like "code red", "code blue" etc. are used. These expressions do not follow the standard "order ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Regular/Routine, Fasting, Blood test/Blood work

I would like to expand my vocabulary with some medical terms in English. I have been thinking about how to say, for example, if I go to see a doctor for a blood test. Q1) Are these phrases correct? ...
5
votes
2answers
168 views

Is “sectio caesare” an appropriate English alternative to “caesarian section”?

On Parenting.se we recently received this question, which refers to sectio caesare birth. I was not familiar with the term, but found that wikipedia redirects the term to the caesarian section page. ...
10
votes
5answers
5k views

Medical term for deafness

Anosmia = Loss of the sense of smell Anopia = Blindness Anaesthesia/Anaphia = Loss of the sense of touch Ageusia = Loss of taste ? = Deafness I can't find an equivalent medical term for ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What do “resolved” and “improved” mean when they are used about recovering from a disease?

Please have a look at the image below. What does the underlined words resolved / resolution improved mean in this image? And, what is the difference between the meanings of "improved" and ...
1
vote
2answers
404 views

Is there any shorter way to say “military medical personnel”?

Is there any shorter way to say "military medical personnel"? I mean by that: all the people in the armed forces that are allowed to use medical equipment on a daily basis.
2
votes
3answers
181 views

What do you call a definition in which some (but not necessarily all) criteria must apply?

This is an algorithm for deciding whether a patient suffers from a specific disease or not: A patient has rheumatoid arthritis if at least four out of the following seven symptoms are present: ...
9
votes
13answers
55k views

How can I describe someone who feels little or no emotion?

I don't mean someone who lacks emotion because they "don't care", but because either they can't feel emotion or the emotional response is delayed because of a genetic disposition. Maybe there is an ...
3
votes
4answers
212 views

“Lung/brain cancer/tumours”

When people talk about illness, they tend to say they have lung cancer instead of lung tumours, or brain tumours instead of brain cancer. Why is this?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What could “cert 4/52” mean in a clinical record? [closed]

What could "cert" mean in these clinical record extracts? Work stressful - cert 1/52. Sent him in to Homerton. Cert 4/52 from 12th March, bus driver.
1
vote
3answers
9k views

What does “dorsal” mean? [closed]

I'm having trouble with the adjective "dorsal", as different authorities have seemingly conflicting opinions. Tortora and Derrickson write in Principles of Anatomy and Physiology that the adjective ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Blood - Bloods - pluralisation

Why is it that the plural of 'blood' is 'blood' in normal usage but 'bloods' (e.g. 'I'll be taking some bloods') is acceptable in a medical context? Are there any words with similar pluralisation ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Alternative to “Patient Discharge”

I visited someone in the hospital today and was struck by some unpleasant associations from seeing "Patient Discharge" on a sign. Surely there is a better word for this...what do they call it in UK ...
9
votes
4answers
14k views

What is the origin of “stat”?

When watching medical television shows, I often hear the doctors (actors) using the term "stat", which I understand to mean "do [action] quickly/immediately". Where did this term originate, and where ...
1
vote
2answers
831 views

Use of medical words

When charting on a patient, and a choice is high cholesterol, should both be capitalized?