This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

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0
votes
2answers
20 views

Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?

In New Zealand, as an island country, 'overseas' is taken to mean 'any foreign country'. eg. I'm going overseas for holiday. Overseas investors brought $1bn into the country last year. ...
2
votes
2answers
112 views

Paradox ? I never understand this clearly

The sentence: I want to finish this game but wish it never ends. Also if possible can you explain what makes a sentence a paradox exactly ?
3
votes
3answers
6k views

Origin of street names ending in “-hurst”

There is a large number of streets in the UK whose names end in -hurst, for example Ravenhurst, Gathurst, Oakhurst, Amhurst, Bonehurst, Eaglehurst, etc. Is there a common meaning for this -hurst ...
-1
votes
0answers
42 views

what is called a subdivision of a grate [on hold]

in an industrial equipment named pallet car manufactured by OutoTec company I have encountered the word 'grate' but its ambiguous. As the document says materials are conveyed by a traveling grate ...
14
votes
5answers
5k views

How to spell [ʒʊʒd] and what does it mean?

I heard this strange word in American Dad over a year ago and it's been bugging me ever since. Not only do I have no idea how it's spelt, I have no idea how it could possibly be spelt. My only guesses ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Meaning of : “as above, so below; as within, so without” [on hold]

What is the meaning of "as above, so below; as within, so without"? I read the answers given for this question at Yahoo Answers, but they left me perplexed. Please shed some light on the phrase.
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

Meaning of “With and Through”

What is the meaning of "with and through" in titles such as "conversation with and through computers" or "thinking with and through examples"? Thanks.
0
votes
2answers
138 views

What's the meaning of “emotional stake”?

What does an "emotional stake" mean? E.g: to increase the emotional stakes, I had my favorites in both.
6
votes
2answers
116 views

Apart from the intensity of the feeling, is there any other difference between “surprised” and “astonished”?

EDITED Surprise (verb) Cause (someone) to feel mild astonishment or shock. Capture, attack, or discover suddenly and unexpectedly. ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

That can be used as a weapon?

Is there a word in the English language that means "that can be used as a weapon"? As in: That can be disposed = disposable That can be thrown = throwable
12
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “I got a bee up my ass about you two” mean?

The context is: Just so you know, I got a bee up my ass about you two.
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What does 'slugger' means in these contexts? [on hold]

There are two absolutely different characters (girls) in Heinlein's novels 'The Star Beast' and 'Citizen of the Galaxy', one of them is 'boy-ish' and another one is 'lady-ish' and both of them are ...
3
votes
3answers
279 views

When if means iff and if, respectively? [duplicate]

It seems sometimes 'if' really means 'if and only if' (abbreviated as iff), and sometimes 'if but not necessarily only if'. Is there a better usage with 'if' than the regular/default way? Should I ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Why does switch take a noun in the plural?

Why do we say "We switched locations." or "We switched phones." instead of "We switched location?" or "We switched phone?" Are there any other verbs that take the noun in the plural?
5
votes
3answers
303 views

About the phrase “ pick someone brain”

Does the phrase " pick someone brain" have the meaning of "ask someone" and is it often used?
2
votes
1answer
37 views

what does “crack thumb” mean?

what does " crack thumb" and also " Balck fall" mean in this sentences from a Play: " that is the House of shaws! blood built it; blood stopped the building of it; blood shall bring it down. see ...
-2
votes
1answer
28 views

Is this what these sentences mean?

"I don't like neither of you" -> In this sentence I think the meaning is that the person doesn't dislike any of the other people. "I haven't done it neither" -> This is just a confusing double ...
2
votes
4answers
513 views

Does adverb placement affect meaning?

He swam slowly to the island. He slowly swam to the island. Some experts say that there is a “slight difference” in meaning. Would you please tell me that difference?
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is there any differences between “I suggest doing” and “I suggest you do?” [duplicate]

I know that both "I suggest doing this" and "I suggest you do this" are grammatically correct. But I wonder if they have same meaning or there are subtle difference between them.
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there a difference between the adjectives “express” and “expressed”? [on hold]

Here is an example. It is the expressed wish of the bride and groom that this be a non-alcoholic occasion. It is the express wish of the bride and groom that this be a non-alcoholic occasion. ...
-1
votes
1answer
67 views

What is this symbol called [on hold]

This symbol shows up when I view a pdf copy of a word document € does anyone know what it is or why.
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? [on hold]

"with an ability to deliver clear and concise communication to our respective designates" It just doesn't read right to me.
-1
votes
2answers
45 views

Meaning of the sentance [on hold]

What does the following line convey " The old man was just as generous with his confidences as with his porridge and tobacco."
4
votes
4answers
193 views

Difference between “would have + past participle” and “would + bare infinitive” in the main clause of a past subjunctive sentence

I'm wondering about the difference in meaning, if any, between the two sentences in each of the following examples. Example 1. a. If he was a serious leader, tackling the debt would have been a ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Meaning of “I never give a sucker an even break”

What does this phrase mean? I never give a sucker an even break. Does it mean that the author of this saying is unwilling to offer somebody who he doesn't like a break/rest while he is working?
-1
votes
3answers
64 views

Does not divide the Sunday from the week [on hold]

Here's from Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 1 Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore task Does not divide the Sunday from the week; It is easy to guess the meaning of: Does not divide the ...
4
votes
1answer
65 views

Difference between promptness and promptitude

Seeing this EL&U question: 'saying thanks to someone answering your email ASAP who is important for you', the first word that came to my mind was promptitude which, as the definition states, can ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

What is meant by “sth”?

I came across this line in a site: Can u make sth effective for a sports betting related product? I can't understand what is meant by sth effective here. I tried to google it but was unable to ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

What's the meaning of “to him who”?

While I was searching on the net, I found this sentence: Memorandum to him who is concerned. I looked for a definition to to him who, but I found nothing. So what's the meaning of it? ِAre ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences [duplicate]

I’m currently reading George Martin’s A Song Of Ice And Fire novels in English. As a non-native speaker (I’m German), I stumbled upon some grammatical constructs that I’ve never seen before, one of ...
0
votes
4answers
157 views

How to name or define a new word? [on hold]

Suppose I wanted to create a new word. Are there any rules for that? How can I do it? If I create the word, how can I ensure that it has an appropriate meaning? For example, in a word like quiz or ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Are the two sentences same meaning? [duplicate]

Is the sentence "I didn't marry you because you were rich." same as " I married you not because you were rich but for another reason."
-3
votes
1answer
36 views

How could one quantify the typical modern non-literal usage style? [on hold]

I was thinking, "'Nobody' (joke) uses words literally in English any more -- but, could we quantify that somehow?" So for example with "nobody," the word now only means "almost no-one". If you want ...
3
votes
3answers
655 views

Can you be literal about non-literal things?

I know many hackles have been raised over the misuse of the word literal. Let's say there are a couple of mobsters talking about a third guy who has made a minor mistake, and jokingly one says, "I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

could you explain the below sentence about reporting?

"Half-yearly reporting included in overall project management costs" a report about the costs of the overall management of the project? or something else? thanks in advance
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Difference between 'attain' and 'achieve' [on hold]

We can say To attain this goal, we should work hard or To achieve this goal, we should work hard What the difference between those two words?
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Phrase: give pause

What exactly does the phrase give (sb.) pause mean? Is it just a simple shortening of the following?: give pause to someone (or give someone pause for thought) cause someone to think ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

Meaning of “nine-to-five kind of person”?

What does "nine-to-five kind of person" mean? For example: The great thing about my job is just music, I get CDs constantly pushed into my hand, and I go to loads of gigs, so if you love music, ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
16
votes
5answers
14k views

Is “curiouser” in fact a word (like in the famous phrase “curiouser and curiouser”)?

Is curiouser, in fact, a word?                                 (Yes, this question is very short, but that’s really all I need to ask.)
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What's the difference between patent and obvious?

Patent is used a lot more in "serious" matters, like legal breaches, such as a "patent breach of law," but does that really mean anything? Does "patent" just sound more refined?
0
votes
1answer
33 views

When back, if I say “Out of office until Thursday” [duplicate]

I am always confused when I get an email stating "out of office until Thursday". Is the sender back on Thursday or still out of office (o.o.o.) on Thursday and only back on Friday? Is there a good ...
1
vote
3answers
11k views

Meaning of a “cheap person”

What is the meaning of this, i have tried to search on dictionary but couldn't find it. Context as in image attached. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=cheap+person Savior is ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Is there a proper name for saying something like “stack'em”?

Is there a proper name for saying something like stack'em instead of stack them or any other "'em" in place of "them"? Is it slang or something to do with dialect? UPDATE It is a ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What is “lay governance” in the context of higher education?

I am looking for a basic definition to understand it. I see it used in texts mainly about US higher education systems and governance.
5
votes
3answers
7k views

“Register” vs. “registry”

What's the difference in meaning between “register” and “registry”? Can both be used interchangeably when talking about an official (public) list of items, records?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

“b'ile over” seemingly incorrect spelling?

"There's no pleasin' her, nohow, no matter how you try! I wouldn't stay if 'twa'n't for the wages and the folks at home what's needin' 'em. But some day--some day I shall jest b'ile over; and when I ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

A tight hair of hern?

"Yes. If she'd just let that tight hair of hern all out loose and careless-like, as it used ter be, and wear the sort of bunnits with posies in 'em, and the kind o' dresses all lace and white ...
0
votes
2answers
122 views

What two words best describe these features?

I am in the middle of developing an app. I'm having some trouble trying to decide the best usage for two features in particular. I know what both of these words mean, but I am becoming increasingly ...
0
votes
2answers
238 views

What is the word that means a person has confused two terms with one another?

Is there a better verb than "confuse" in this passage: Joe has confused the terms A, B, and C. When describing B he used the attributes of A. Also, Joe used attributes of C when discussing A.