This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

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0
votes
2answers
411 views

Rouge or Rogue? [closed]

Is there a difference between the two? I want to write a sentence which says Users Go Mad, and would like to know the correct word to use here. Is this just American/British difference?
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What do you call the person sitting behind the driver on a bike?

I know pillion is a seat behind the rider of a horse or motorbike etc. I would like to know the word for the person sitting on pillion.
0
votes
2answers
624 views

What is meaning of “off” in this statement? [duplicate]

Would someone please explain this: "C++, pronounced "C plus plus," is a programming language that was built off the C language". What is meaning of "off" in this statement?
2
votes
3answers
167 views

Grapes and vintners

Please, can you translate this? These dregs are distilled until a clear liquid results that retains, supposedly, the vapors left behind by the grapes gone to the vintner. I suspect that the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What does the word “trip” exactly mean in English? [closed]

My question is whether “trip” means experiences on the way to one’s destination or experiences after arriving at the destination? Or can it mean both?
1
vote
5answers
3k views

To not want to believe something has happened

I usually hear people use the phrase "I don't/didn't want to believe it," and I've always been curious as to what it meant. Does it mean that the person is in denial of something? Or does it mean that ...
2
votes
3answers
131 views

Can I say that a scientific field has been “polymorphic” if it has changed dramatically over time?

The field of artificial intelligence, abbreviated as AI, has been quite turbulent and polymorphic since its creation. If not, what other word or construct could I use? By polymorphic I meant ...
0
votes
2answers
988 views

Word for “collecting money for a special event from a group of people”

What is the English word for "collecting money for a special event from a group of people"? For example, say some friends are planing a party. Each one has to contribute some amount of money to the ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

“He started paying Carol to look after me”

Can anybody help me understand this sentence? He started paying Carol to look after me... Does it literally mean he started to give her money for looking after me or is there some other meaning ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“For all intents and purposes”

The phrase "for all intents and purposes" seems redundant and circular to me, because of the overlap of the meanings of the individual words: intend: have in mind as what one wishes to do or achieve. ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What are the uses of “totality”?

Often I find myself wanting to use 'totality' in a sentence that would otherwise work with 'total'. What are the correct usages of 'totality' given that both nouns describing the sum or completeness ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

What is “Loan principal”?

I'm using an English financial application to keep track of my spending. When trying to categorize a transaction as a student loan payout, the closest built-in category I could find was "Loan ...
1
vote
2answers
219 views

can the term “pro rata” include cutting for non-use in the middle of a period?

Suppose somebody pays pro rata every three weeks. I understand that if they cut short during that period, "pro rata" means the amount is recalculated according to how many days they use and only ...
0
votes
3answers
764 views

“During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company” — does it mean that 1988 was included?

I am an ESL student and I wonder what the following sentence means. During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company Does it mean that 1988 was included? I am not quite sure about the meaning ...
0
votes
3answers
159 views

“Skyscrapers are of various shapes” vs. “skyscrapers are various shapes”

Skyscrapers are of various shapes. Skyscrapers are various shapes. Why do we use of in the sentence above? Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences?
2
votes
1answer
310 views

Is “get sb / sth off the way” an accepted idiom or ‘theatrical nerd’s line’?

There was the following sentence in New York Times (December 12) article, titled “Govern in poetry”: This guy can write and he can speak, but he’s put those talents in a drawer for much of his ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

Etymology & Colloquialism

I'm writing an essay for college applications in which I have to create a class. My idea is a class about the origin, change, and regional dialects of the English language. As an example, one would ...
2
votes
1answer
20k views

“Take account of” vs. “take into account”

Is there any difference in meaning between: take account of take into account Or do they both mean "to take into consideration"?
7
votes
4answers
339 views

What does “trollpoking” mean?

The edit summary here says: cleaned up a bit, removed the trollpoking. I'm certain removing trollpoking is referring to the removal of: This answer is going to be deleted as off-topic, isn't ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Differences between Amount, Count, Number and Quantity [duplicate]

My programming peers suggest to use the term count with discrete things: count of words, count of sentences and so on. Then again my instructor suggest me to use the term "number" for the discrete ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

What is the difference between 'The Germany National team' and 'the German national team'? [duplicate]

I can't say I get it. I think the difference is: 'The Germany National team' is team which represents Germany as a country. And it is its formal title. 'the German national team' is team which ...
4
votes
1answer
167 views

Why is there “Germany National Team”, not “German National Team”?

Why is the team from Germany called "Germany National Team", not "German National Team"? On official Internet sites, it is the same for every official national team; Germany National, France National, ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

“I dig my auntie” — what does this mean [closed]

My baby has a t-shirt with "I dig my auntie" on it. What does this mean?
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Difference between “idiom” and “proverb”? [duplicate]

What are the differences between idioms and proverbs?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Are transmitted” vs. “are being transmitted”

After eight bits are [being] transmitted, D must go high for at least one bit time, which is referred to as stop bit. Is "being" required there? Why or why not?
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Regarding the usage of “being”

Does this sentence: When no data is being transmitted, D remains high has the same meaning as When there is no data transmission, D remains high
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “same” vs. “selfsame”

I have been wondering in my head when is it more appropriate grammatically and more appropriate in terms of the English language to use word selfsame instead of same. The research that I have done ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the meaning of “as much as anything”?

This book is mine as much as anything! What does this mean? Does this mean, "This is REALLY MINE!!" I would want native speakers' opinion.
0
votes
2answers
453 views

Is “they sold the stocks out from under me” a common idiom?

They sold the stocks out from under me. Is this "sold the stocks out from under me" common? It seems to mean they defrauded me.
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Conjunction when one element contains another

I write a paper that defines a certain algorithm on geometric shapes. I have a sentence similar to the following: If the input to the algorithm is connected, convex or rectangular, then its output ...
0
votes
1answer
839 views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
0
votes
3answers
119 views

Meaning of “I have three books and CDs”

I have three books and CDs. Does this mean I have three books and three CDs? Or are there three items in total? Are both possible? I am asking for a native speaker's opinion.
-2
votes
1answer
480 views

Can 'repercuss' be used as a verb?

Lord Owen, the former British Foreign Secretary, in a BBC interview tonight with Jeremy Paxman used the word 'repercuss' as a verb. It was with reference to President Obama's handshake with Raul ...
2
votes
2answers
158 views

What is the meaning of 'exhausting the evidence' in the sentence?

Here is the sentence ... let us call the relevant, overall sets of scientific belief ‘theories’; different, conflicting theories are consistent with the data; the data exhaust the evidence for ...
0
votes
2answers
124 views

Meaning of “Scarce”

I'm reading Time Machine by H. G. Wells. And there is a sentence: "At first I scarce thought of stopping, scarce thought of anything but these new sensations". What does "scarce" mean in this ...
-2
votes
2answers
195 views

Why used 'occurrence' in the sentence? [closed]

The sentence is Removes the first occurrence of a specific object from list. I don't understand why 'occurrence' is used. Is its meaning like 'encounter', so the sentence could be rephrased as ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

“Tomboy” but in reverse

The word "tomboy" is used to express the idea of a girl who behaves in a boyish manner. It's not usually considered a negative term, or at least not very negative, and generally just means the girl ...
0
votes
2answers
9k views

What does “in before” mean?

Can anyone please provide a simple explanation of the phrase "in before" with some common-usage examples. Is it appropriate to use this phrase in a context such as "This happened and then this ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

Alter vs Modify vs Change (in Legal Documents)

Consider the quote from "What is a Grantor Trust" article. This trust is revocable, which simply means it can be altered, modified, and otherwise changed or even terminated during the life of the ...
3
votes
4answers
20k views

Use of “for one” [closed]

When we say “for one” in a sentence, what does it mean? I heard a sentence in a TV program where Robin Hood said: Who will bear this injustice? I, for one, will not. As I understand it, “I ...
0
votes
2answers
961 views

What does “burrow (one’s) nose deep” mean? Is it an idiom?

November.30 NPR Books introduces Emily Dickingson’s poems on leftover envelopes under the title, “Emily Dickinson's Envelope Writings” “Readers always seem to want to get closer to Emily ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

What benefit was there by replacing “chart” with “tabulate”, then with “tally” in the NYT headline: “Bank charted business linked to China hiring.”?

I was drawn to the changes of the headline of today’s New York Times’ article reporting JPMorgan Chase established a program to hire a lot of sons and daughters of Chinese dignitaries. The ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

The deeper meaning of “not enough coffee yet on my end” [closed]

What's the deeper meaning of this phrase? not enough coffee yet on my end
2
votes
2answers
559 views

difference between apt and fit

Question I'm particularly interested in the meaning of apt, but while I was searching through some dictionaries and examples it struck me how close the words apt and fit seem to be. Thus: what ...
0
votes
1answer
165 views

Is there a difference between 'unknowingly' and 'unintentionally'? [closed]

Sorry, it was unknowingly. Sorry, it was unintentionally.
2
votes
1answer
222 views

Is there a verb for “to make something Spanish”?

I'm not entirely clear how you would describe a verb that fulfils this function. I'm looking for a word equivalent to "gallicise", "americanise" or "hellenise", but for Spain equivalent. Is there such ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

What is “Web Copy” and why does everyone refer to it without an article?

I recently read a blog post that talks about "Web Copy". I have never heard of this term before, so I did some searching around. I'm still not sure what the meaning of this is. What bugs me is that ...
0
votes
2answers
22k views

Opposite of “expanded”?

I am looking for the word to use when saying the opposite of expanded/expand/expansion. Here is an example of how I want to use the word: In the summer the wood expanded, now it is winter and the ...
2
votes
8answers
11k views

“Iterate” vs. “Reiterate”

Definition of iterate: to say or do again or again and again Definition of reiterate: to state or do over again or repeatedly sometimes with wearying effect The distinction seems to be ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

The difference between fight for and fight against

I wrote a paper about whether online privacy should be regulated by laws. My point is that laws cannot set universal rules to regulate online personal information, but laws can help people prevent ...