This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

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0
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0answers
26 views

“relaxed flying fingers” associated with ergonomic keyboard computer interface?

I want to start an open source software project and call it "relaxed flying fingers". The project is about a better keyboard interface, especially for touch typers (people typing with ten fingers). ...
2
votes
3answers
102 views

Image of the word “shortened”

I am not a native speaker of English, and I'm having a problem at work about the word "shortened" . I used this word to express that our new product can now load XXX much faster than the previous ...
0
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3answers
40 views

what is an engraved portrait? [closed]

"Queen Victoria a fine engraved portrait showing the Queen in profile looking into a book. She is dressed in her familiar black (which she wore for the rest of her life after Albert died) with her ...
4
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3answers
74 views

Does “caffeinated” make any sense?

A while back, when we learnt how to remove the caffeine from coffee beans, we coined the word decaffeinated to denote coffee that's had the caffeine taken out. I've noticed more and more recently, as ...
0
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3answers
57 views

What does “cotton on” mean? [closed]

I was reading a book, and found the the phrase cotton on as in "Aha!" he said, when he cottoned on. At first I assumed this was a misspelling, and it should have been "as he catched on". ...
0
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2answers
95 views

Is this a sarcastic answer to “good to see you”?

In the movie Fallen, Denzel Washington's character, Det. Hobbes, is visiting a death-row inmate previously arrested by him. The inmate, Edgar Reese (played by Elias Koteas), greets him by saying "It's ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Is “natural” restricted to plant-based material found without human interference? [closed]

The Whole Earth Sweetener Co. markets a stevia-based sweetener as Pure Via. The packaging reads, in part: We understand that consumers have different ideas about what natural means. We want ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

subconscious vs unconscious

A friend of mine believes that a thought that is underlying, and not the main focus of the mind, can be described as a thought had "unconsciously". I am convinced she is incorrect, and the word to use ...
2
votes
1answer
243 views

What does “rummun” mean in this sentence?

"They have had a bitter quarrel I think" said he and bit into the bagel. "They're rummuns" said he chewing it.
0
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1answer
27 views

“conal” vs “conical”

Is there any difference in meaning, usage or frequency between the words "conal" and "conical" within a mathematical context, i.e. when talking about cones?
3
votes
1answer
2k views

What is “soft skill”?

Please elaborate what does it mean by soft skill in term of English language.
0
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3answers
94 views

Origin of “Innocent” to mean “Sexually Inexperienced”

I was thinking about the way "innocent" is often used (in both casual and moderately formal contexts) to mean "sexually inexperienced/oblivious", and came to the conclusion that using the phrase in ...
4
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3answers
83 views

What is a cross-nibbed pen?

He also thoughtfully provided ink and a cross-nibbed pen, with which I wrote my post cards, and which I hope you received in due time. From Domestic Life in Rumania by Dorothea Kirke, 1916.
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6answers
151 views

Is there a word for the status of a team being 'home' or 'away'

A team can be 'home' or 'away' - but what is this status called? At first I thought 'location' or 'venue' but this isn't right - the location is singular and the basis of what determines the 'home' ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Meaning of “well” in full and meaningful sentences

In everyday English, people use "well" in their speech very loosely. "Well, I don't know." "Well yeah!" "Oh well..." ...etc. I know "well" has different meanings and emotions attached to them, ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Is there a term for the use of an unnecessary or redundant adjective?

I know there is a term for the use of adjectives, and maybe adverbs, that are unnecessary or logically redundant. Examples are: -a free gift -a cold snow
3
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4answers
10k views

Get a life | You have no life

I saw this as a mild insult on the Internet, one person tells another: "get a life" or "you have no life". What does it mean literally and what is its meaning as an insult?
3
votes
3answers
9k views

Difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”

What is the difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”? I found these questions: Difference between “aim” and “purpose” Difference between “purpose” and ...
12
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4answers
2k views

What is the origin of the word “conk”?

Is it obsolete to use this word? Where does it come from? I couldn't find the origin of this term. Can I use the phrase "The machine conked out" or should I replace conked out with something else?
10
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4answers
5k views

Meaning of 'up/down' after a verb [closed]

There are lots of instances of using 'up' or 'down' after verbs. Instances: eat up, drink up, meet up, finish up, start up, fill up, clean up, wipe up, tie up, etc. What do they add as meaning to a ...
1
vote
3answers
323 views

Meaning of Top Gun quote

In the movie Top Gun Maverick says: "I'm gonna need a beer to put these flames out." This was part of a compilation of quotes supporting the gay theme of the movie. Urbandictionary doesn't have a ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

“Kick off tracking time in the notepad” means start making notes or stop making notes

I'm not sure for 100% if "Kick off tracking time in the notepad" means to start or, otherwise, to stop tracking time in the notepad. Could anybody explain? Thank you.
3
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3answers
2k views

What does it mean to be “in suspense”?

What does it actually mean to be "in suspense"? It's not a place, or a verb. How would you define "suspense"?
0
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1answer
38 views

the word for an object that has a name that doesn't describe it [closed]

the word for an object that has a name that doesn't describe it for example; prospect park in this case; the name actually does describe the thing (location) lets pretend that it didn't like ...
2
votes
6answers
9k views

What does “In some ways” exactly mean?

What does the expression "in some ways" exactly mean, as in The English language is limited in some ways, and perhaps most limited in its ability to express love. Is it generic (like in many ...
4
votes
6answers
779 views

Is there a word to describe the feeling of wanting to be someone else

Is there a word that describes having a deep desire to have a different life ( because the current life is bad), or a word that describes a longing to forget the past or just forget everything in ...
0
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0answers
39 views

Word for belief or prejudice that is held, but it is not conscious

I remember reading about an idea of a belief or prejudice that is subconscious. It had a prefix, and it was something like: belief -> alief or prejudice -> ajudice But I can't remember the ...
-2
votes
2answers
81 views

Is it grammatically correct to respond “Yes, I won't go.”?

If I were asked the question "You won't go to the party, right?", would it be incorrect to say "Yes, I won't go"? If one had to choose between "yes" and "no, would it be more grammatically correct to ...
0
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0answers
14 views

Before he “agree” or he would “agreed” [duplicate]

Please before the interviews make sure that Dr. Mikel agrees with your list ..???? OR Please before the interviews make sure that Dr. Mikel agree with your list ??
5
votes
3answers
292 views

If a chicken crosses the road, is it still a pedestrian? [closed]

A pedestrian is one who travels on foot, ped being the Latin root for foot. But even though many people refer to chicken's feet as feet, are they actually feet scientifically speaking, such that they ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

When did “to forgive” lose its primary meaning for pardoning and become solely about an emotional response?

During a recent debate I was having with a peer, I was shocked to find out that the word "forgive" no longer carries a primary association with the act of pardoning another individual (i.e., ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

In this sentence, what parts of speech are the words 'next' and 'last'?

Could someone please tell me what the word 'next' and 'last' are? I mean the word class. 'it's your turn next ish' 'I read the letters last ish' Thank you!
1
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1answer
71 views
14
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5answers
43k views

How should “midnight on…” be interpreted?

From what I understand, the word "midnight" is usually interpreted incorrectly. Midnight is written as "12am" which would imply that it's in the morning. Therefore, it should be at the start of the ...
5
votes
4answers
566 views

Is there a word for the mental state of laughter?

We speak of madness when someone is in a fit of anger, and being smitten when someone is in love(with someone), etc. But what about when someone just can't stop laughing? i.e, when someone is ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“aiming to” vs “aimed to be”

I'm trying to define a goal for my scientific journal paper. What is the proper use of English language and grammar here? Does it make sense in its current form? We are running a study towards ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Woman front bits” meaning

Whats does "woman front bits" actually means? This question is surprisingly inspired by one of the answers to this question: "Is there any slang I should avoid in the UK or Ireland". It is ...
4
votes
4answers
939 views

Usage of “might” and “would” to indicate doubt

Do the sentences She might be only 28, but Jodie Whittaker.... and My parents would have walked along the Barrow wrongly suggest doubt, or are they normal usage? Are there names for ...
4
votes
2answers
628 views

What does “fast eye” mean?

The following is taken from the subtitles (grammatical errors appear in the film) in the 1979 movie Wise Blood: Hazel Motes: I only follered her to say I wasn't beholden to none of her fast eye ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Make the present count meaning

Kindly tell me what is the meaning of make the present count in this sentence from the last sentence of an article run by the Dawn.COM electronic newspaper: The leaderships on both sides need to ...
4
votes
2answers
233 views

Is 'keep someone across' a new phrasal verb?

How common is the expression 'to keep someone across' the news. Is this a new phrasal verb? I've noticed it mostly in the last four years on British news programmes, such as the BBC. It seems to mean ...
0
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1answer
55 views

what is the purpose of the suffix 'ish' at the end of the adjectives 'girlish' and 'boyish'

Hi could anyone tell me what is the purpose of the suffix 'ish' at the end of the adjectives 'girlish' and 'boyish? I mean you could use the suffix 'ly' but what is the need of the ish? I know that it ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

conniption origin?

I viewed the thread about conniption dido - which I'd never heard before. But was wondering what true meaning of conniption was? I always figured it was an old medical term for seizure or ...
1
vote
2answers
201 views

What is Poetry? What does not count as Poetry? [closed]

Background: a google "define:poem" did not give me much closure: poem: a piece of writing in which the expression of feelings and ideas is given intensity by particular attention to diction ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “jargon” and “technical terms”

Each subject matter has its own set of terms called jargon which is expressed in its particular grammatical rules. Technical terminology or Term of Art is the specialized vocabulary of any specialized ...
0
votes
1answer
114 views

“She always sees…” or “She is always seeing…”

She always sees things that don't exist. She is always seeing things that don't exist. In the first sentence we use verb "to see" in the present simple tense. In the second sentence, verb ...
3
votes
3answers
114 views

Illness and injury

I've just heard on BBC Radio 4: A man is seriously ill after having been hit by a police car. Is this a correct use of ill (assuming that he hasn't contracted an infection)? I'd not have used ...
1
vote
3answers
92 views

The difference between “it” and “he/she”

There seems to be a difference between these two pronouns besides the obvious one of animacy. I want to know if people agree or can point out the flaw in my thinking. I've been attempting to wrangle ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

“A positive influence on [the] circulation of blood”

What is the difference in meaning between the following? Habitual physical activity has a positive influence on circulation of blood. Habitual physical activity has a positive influence on ...
0
votes
2answers
145 views

Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...