2
votes
2answers
245 views

“Quainted the auto supplier has hit share of potholes.” Did I hear right? What does it mean?

I’ve been practicing listening of English language news on FEN for years, and heard the latest (March 24) Wall Street Journal Barron’s magazine news as follows: “Visteon is maneuvering to be a key ...
10
votes
3answers
490 views

“This box of matches is empty”

There are several Japanese books teaching Japanese students how to write in English. I found this example in 『英作文参考書の誤りを正す』 (Correcting Errors in English Composition Manuals) by Michio Kawakami and ...
1
vote
2answers
122 views

What is the difference between “Employment” and “Job”?

I cannot understand the differences between the nouns (they both seem to mean "work"). For example: when we hire an employee, we have to define payroll and benefits for them. So which word better ...
1
vote
1answer
299 views

One word/phrase to describe the reaction when you eat a very spicy-hot food

I've read the discussion here about Difference between “spicy” and “hot”. I've also read this one: How to say that food is hot (temperature) without the listener thinking that I mean “spicy”?. But I ...
-1
votes
1answer
77 views

Why is it “get” and not “gets”, in “watch her get hit”?

He likes to watch her get hit. vs. He likes to watch her gets hit. No matter how much I research, I still can't explain simply why get is correct and gets isn't. Here's what I think, ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Difference between chastise and lambaste?

Is there a difference between chastise and lambaste? When should one use chastise and when should one use lambaste?
1
vote
2answers
131 views

Meaning of “Write Off” in a particular context

This question is about a specific Seinfeld episode "The Package". For those that are familiar with the show, Kramer breaks-up Jerry stereo package and sends it back to him with a insurance. That way ...
1
vote
2answers
169 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...
0
votes
3answers
57 views

Which word is better, damage or defile?

I think I look like Brad Peter. – Oh, you are damaging my idol. (He is far from Brad’s look). I mean my friend’s words made me feel uncomfortable because my idol was compared to something much ...
2
votes
3answers
78 views

Jumps vs. Leaps

Does a curve in science or finance have sudden jumps or sudden leaps? We talk about a discontinuous curve. My position is that jumps is more appropriate but I might be wrong.
1
vote
2answers
157 views

Can “good” and “well” be used interchangeably?

I told someone I was doing good in my new community, and they thought I was talking about my well being. When I told them that I meant I was doing good in the community like in a helping out ...
1
vote
3answers
83 views

What's the meaning of 'deflating mots' in this sentence?

I'm graduating in translation and one of my 2nd semester's works is a movie review about Philomena. I am stuck, however, at this part: (He's an) expert purveyor of deflating mots on any subject, ...
11
votes
4answers
817 views

Why “fly” in “the Flying Dutchman”?

The question is how to justify the use of fly in “the Flying Dutchman”. It confused me for a long time. The right word could be wander, sail, roam, drift, but why fly? I looked it up the dictionary, ...
-1
votes
1answer
74 views

Is “encrusted with dust” correct? [closed]

A big black vehicle rumbles through the streets of the slum. Its battered exterior is encrusted with dust. "Encrusted" means that water or oil has been combined with dust (or something) and then ...
-2
votes
1answer
147 views

The ironic correlation of the words “Ineffable” and “Circumlocution”

Both the word "Ineffable" and "Circumlocution" are contradictory by definition. For context; first The very existence of the words shows defies its definition; so should one say "indescribable" as ...
1
vote
1answer
519 views

What is the difference, if any, between “divine providence” and “Providence” (with a capital p)?

ODO defines providence as: providence: [mass noun] 1 the protective care of God or of nature as a spiritual power: they found their trust in divine providence to be a source of comfort ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“Our editors compete to get your job”

I run a web service where customers submit an image with a description what needs to be edited, and editors compete with prices to get that editing job. I want to put the following sentence in an ...
0
votes
2answers
103 views

“Roll” vs. “roll up” [closed]

Are these two verbs the same? According to Longman, they are the same. Here are some made up sentences: I rolled this (up) into a ball. Let's roll (up) our sleeves. (I made up these ...
1
vote
0answers
231 views

What would be the best answer for ( happy birth day wish you all the best )? [closed]

What would be the best answer for ( happy birth day to you , wish you all the best )?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“I love you for who you are” vs. “I love you as you are” vs. “I love you for what you are” [closed]

I love you for who you are. I came across the line from a BBC Radio’s drama, and wondered what’s the difference from saying “I love you as you are,” or “I love you for what you are.” Would you ...
1
vote
3answers
231 views

“justify” vs. “align” in the context of alignment

A function offers an option. The value of the option decides if elements in a column are aligned right, aligned left or centered. Is it OK to call this option justify or is only align correct?
0
votes
2answers
238 views

“chance” as a verb in context [closed]

In the following text, is "chance" a verb or a noun? Very few did better than chance in spotting which was which. Could I replace it with "guess"?
2
votes
2answers
121 views

US English — “primary grains being produced” vs. “major cereals being produced”

I am correcting a Spanish-to-English translation that states, The primary grains being produced in the world are maize, wheat, rice, barley, sorghum and oats. I would prefer to use cereals ...
1
vote
4answers
165 views

Is “amend XX” a commonly understood English term to express “add something to XX” or “modify XX”?

In our company, we've recently had a discussion about the usage of the verb amend in the context of a screen in our software user interface, where a button reads amend set (meaning add something to ...
3
votes
4answers
298 views

How should the word “brutal” be used in marketing?

I noticed that some companies use the word brutal for marketing their products. Examples: brutal performance – a data storage software markets itself with this, they mean that their software is ...
2
votes
1answer
116 views

“Reducing degeneracies of/from/in FKK transmitter”

As stated in the title, I'm trying to get correct preposition — of/from/in. The sentence corresponds to the title of my work that addresses degeneracies that occur in FKK transmitter. However, this ...
9
votes
5answers
9k views

Is this an example of extrapolation?

I saw a joke on facebook today where professor cat states: There are two types of people in this world: Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data My brother thinks that this really isn't ...
0
votes
3answers
508 views

Using “in which year” in middle of sentence

Can I use in which year in the middle of a sentence? The industry has being growing at a record-breaking scale, excepting only 2008, in which year, financial crisis stroke most sectors of the ...
4
votes
3answers
135 views

the “meat” of one’s hand

Is it common to use the phrase “meat” of one’s hand in the meaning of trace of one’s hand or finger print? There was an interesting essay on eraser written by Marry Norris, titled “Erasehead” in ...
1
vote
1answer
159 views

When to use “ordain” over “order”?

In the book Dune Messiah, I read: "The Emperor has said I must die if I set foot on Dune," she said, making a last desperate effort. "You spoke of this yourself. You are condemning me if you take ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

How to answer grammatically ambiguous tricky questions [closed]

Here are some examples : 1) The mangoes (will ripe/ripe/will ripen) over time said John. 2) The least considered in the latest Terrorist attacks (are/were/was) the innocent victims. My choice for ...
0
votes
1answer
267 views

Looking for a word or words meaning to change something so it's more widely used and more efficient to use [closed]

I'm writing a proposal regarding website development work and would like a meaningful name for the proposal. I currently have a system for developing websites that isn't the most efficient and costs a ...
1
vote
2answers
104 views

Can “take” be a synonym of “attempt”, “approach” or “undertaking”?

Is it meaningful to say "we are preparing the last take at this battle" or "the third take finally brought them a victory" "I will try one more take at this"?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

tailored to someone needs VS tailor-made

I wrote a text about our company's services and added that we also can offer products tailored to the needs of our clients. One of my colleagues insisted that the expression was wrong and I should say ...
3
votes
4answers
251 views

What does “raising the debt ceiling is not groovy” mean? Is the word “groovy" obsolete among the youth of America”?

In Japan, the word groovy has been used to mean "fashionable and trendy" as an imported English word, which I think, doesn’t go far from the definition, "fashionable, attractive and interesting" in ...
4
votes
6answers
440 views

“Group” vs. “community” usage

Question 1 When we have a certain number of people that share the same interest, do we refer to them as: interest group or community [sharing same interest]? What would be preferred and more ...
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Is there a difference between “select” and “selected”?

When flying, I often read phrases like the following: Special Meals only available on select flights […] Then again, wouldn't it also make sense to say Special Meals only available on ...
3
votes
6answers
559 views

“Too” as a sentence modifier

I was recently having a discussion with a friend on the "sure-thing principle" (not relevant but Google if you wish to know what that is). We were discussing it in the context of a scenario and the ...
4
votes
3answers
16k views

What is the difference between “brain” and “mind”?

Could someone please explain the contextual difference of this two words? If I for instance say: I am using my brain to decide in what direction to move. or I am using my mind to decide in ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“And to you” or “you too”?

I really like to chat with English folks, so I have wished them Merry Christmas. To my surprise I have noticed the following pattern — the British answered "and to you", but Americans "you too". The ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

To avail of an opportunity

If I were to be able to do something (say I'm a slave and am able to become free). What would it mean to "avail myself of the opportunity"? What would this mean? Would this mean to take advantage of ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is “that” used here?

Why doesn't the author just simply say "trusting your gut"? He lit up when talking about movies and people that have influenced him, particularly Billy Wilder’s “Sunset Boulevard,” which he said ...
4
votes
4answers
332 views

What does “Japan-lite problems” mean?

It’s pity to learn our own country is viewed as a bad example for other countries not to follow. I found the word “Japan-lite problems” in the article of Time magazine (August 25 issue) titled “Six ...
3
votes
2answers
503 views

Closest in meaning confusion

I am preparing for an exam and came across the following problems. Since my english is limited in knowledge i am posting it here. The sentence: This nitrogen dioxide(NO2) plays a role in the ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Proverb: “have fate without destiny”

I was looking for an English equivalent of the Chinese proverb (有缘无分) which describes couples who meet but who do not for whatever reason stay together. My friend (native speaker, no Chinese ...
1
vote
2answers
448 views

Does a comparative always need to compare with something?

As I understand it, comparatives compare with something. So something that is colder is more cold than another thing. However, can't a word like colder be used as an adjective without being compared ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

Is “the exchange (between Perry and Romney) was not the clear winner” a common English expression?

I noticed the line “the exchange was not the clear winner” in the following sentence of the article titled “The Take: Perry’s challenging road ahead” appearing in Washington Post Sept. 24 issue: “On ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “of” instead of “have” correct?

I have noticed a lot of people use of instead of have, for example: "that must of been really annoying". Is this correct?
0
votes
2answers
323 views

Use “Plumb it down” instead of “Track it down”

Can we use these two sentences in place of another: I've tracked the problem down and found something blocking our way. I've plumbed the problem down and found something blocking our way. I am ...
5
votes
5answers
518 views

Is the word “all” implied by this question?

I saw a post on Programmers.StackExchange in which someone asks the question: Why do programmers [or anyone] give the "dead fish" hand shake in an interview? The responses to that question say ...