1
vote
3answers
45 views

Is he “making a play” for her or is he “making a pass” at her?

to make a play for someone - to attempt to attract the romantic interest of someone. to make a pass at someone - to make a romantic advance at someone. To a non-native speaker, the ...
25
votes
5answers
5k views

Difference between “I am really sorry” and “I really am sorry”

I know they are slightly different, but I can't tell how. I've read about the usage of the word "really" in a negative sentence. But it didn't tell me about how the position of the word "really" can ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

“to be of” vs “to be”

[Finally, Marshall pointed to the judge's oath ... Part of the core of this reasoning is found in the following statements from the decision: (source, around fifteen lines above the heading ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

“I am from” vs. “I am with”

I want to say that I work for Company A or represent it. I see 2 ways to express this: I am from Company A I am with Company A Which way is correct one? What are other ways to say it? ...
0
votes
1answer
255 views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “pure” will(power)?

In English, we use the phrase "sheer force" much more often than "pure force" (Google Ngram). And willpower. What is the difference, in meaning and usage, between the two (and is there a reason for ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Difference between article, tutorial, how-to, course, track

I find these words(keywords) article, tutorial, how-to, course, track...etc some what same but CS people always use them (even my tutor) in different ways.. Don't assume this is about the programming ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Relationship between Juxtaposition, Oxymoron, and Paradox [closed]

Explain the definition and relationship between "juxtaposition", "oxymoron", and "paradox". I'm supposed to apply this to Romeo and Juliet too, so any examples including them would be appreciated. ...
0
votes
1answer
277 views

“What a shame!” versus “Such a shame!” [closed]

I would like to know the difference between "What a shame!" and "Such a shame!"". When do I use one or the other? I am Brazilian, so I don't know exactly how to use them.
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Difference between chastise and lambaste?

Is there a difference between chastise and lambaste? When should one use chastise and when should one use lambaste?
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Meaning of “induce of” in letters by Thomas Jefferson

March 24th 1789 In Europe I doubt whether you can; because our government gives it’s offices on it’s own knowledge of persons, and not on the recommendations of others. They give their ...
3
votes
1answer
561 views

“to not get” vs “not to get”

I came across this sentence in an article, "As she speaks of her family, friends and life, it's difficult to not get that 'feel good' mood." I'm wondering if the following sentence could also mean ...
0
votes
4answers
114 views

Restrain vs curb [closed]

In an exam I found this phrase: There was very strong support for the police who were determined to (curb) this kind of crime. There was a choice between restrain and curb. Why was curb the ...
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

it's raining vs. it rains [closed]

I know what does it mean by saying "It's raining" but what about "It rains"? what does it imply when I say "It rains" right after saying "It's raining"? I saw it in a novel and get confused.
-5
votes
1answer
66 views

How to comprehend “The output should be false.”? [closed]

Consider a function in a computer program which returns a boolean value (true or false). The output should be false。 can be interpreted as either of the following two: 1. As we expected, the output ...
5
votes
1answer
320 views

difference between action and live action

In film genres I have seen and heard 2 words: 1) Action Movie 2) Live-Action Movie What is difference between these 2 words? What live represent here?
5
votes
4answers
9k views

“Dignity” vs. “respect”

Today, I read an article, and one sentence talked about treating other people with dignity and respect I had thought I understood the difference between the words dignity and respect. But then ...
16
votes
2answers
2k views

Does the word, ‘peruse’ have a single meaning of ‘attentive reading,’ or double, contradicting meanings of ‘attentive’ and ‘cursory’ reading?

I’m confused to find opposite definitions in the same word, ‘peruse’ in Readers English Japanese Dictionary published by a leading foreign language dictionary publisher in Japan. It defines ‘peruse’ ...
2
votes
4answers
492 views

“Implicate” vs. “incriminate”

I am exploring possible differences in the meanings of 'implicate/incriminate' from using different direct objects. Assume the context is police interrogation: He implicated/incriminated his ...
0
votes
2answers
441 views

“Precondition” vs. “prerequisite”

In conclusion, security is the precondition of political freedom and political freedom is the prerequisite for economic freedom. Do precondition and prerequisite mean the same in the above? Is ...
2
votes
2answers
584 views

What's the difference between “sea port” and “maritime port”?

Road transport is not the only sector concerned. LNG is also used in maritime and inland waterway transport. The Commission therefore proposes the installation of fuel stations in leading ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“I love you for who you are” vs. “I love you as you are” vs. “I love you for what you are” [closed]

I love you for who you are. I came across the line from a BBC Radio’s drama, and wondered what’s the difference from saying “I love you as you are,” or “I love you for what you are.” Would you ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Difference between “focus” and “concentration”

What is the difference between focus and concentration in the following context? High-flow activities require focus and concentration; your mind is actively engaged in what you are doing.
11
votes
3answers
10k views

“I am on it” vs. “I am at it”

What are the differences between I am on it and I am at it? What does the latter mean? I found the definition of the former on Urban Dictionary and understand that it means I'm going to solve it ...
1
vote
2answers
413 views

Dignitary vs VIP(Very Important Person)

Incidentally I have heard the CBS news about the Bulgarian president visit in US. The exact sentence was something like: We can't be too specific about the president's schedule due to security ...
1
vote
1answer
873 views

What's the use of 'with' here? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Usage of the verb “provide” Is the sentence “It provides people an easy way to communicate.” grammatically correct? Can you provide me a mouse pad? and ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

How does “among” vs “between” affect the meaning of this sentence from the Times?

I realize that this has been discussed elsewhere on the site, but I was interested in the use of the preposition "among" in a sentence from a story in yesterday's New York Times: Research done by ...
7
votes
5answers
6k views

Is there a difference between “select” and “selected”?

When flying, I often read phrases like the following: Special Meals only available on select flights […] Then again, wouldn't it also make sense to say Special Meals only available on ...
1
vote
2answers
284 views

Differences between “stupid to the last drop” and “stupid”

My colleague was screaming You are stupid to the last drop at another colleague who accidentally formatted her hard disk. Is there such an expression as stupid to the last drop? Are there ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference in meaning between “on his job” and “in his job”

What does this sentence mean? He is working fifty percent more on his job and fifty percent less in his job. He is 100% happier.
8
votes
4answers
641 views

“Back up data” or “back data up”?

Which is correct? To back up data. To back data up. The context is the following: He was careful enough to perform tests and [back up data | back data up] to avoid any problems.
14
votes
4answers
11k views

What is the difference between “daemon” and “demon” in a religious context?

Is there a difference between demon and daemon in a religious context?
10
votes
5answers
1k views

“Faster, not sooner”

Over the weekend, I watched a talking head on TV saying the following sentence. An economic recovery will come faster, not sooner. I can't make proper sense of this as both are synonymous to me. ...
1
vote
6answers
3k views

Differences between “world-view” and “ideology”

These terms have slightly different nuances in meaning and connotation. Would you use world-view in an academic discussion? What is the correct context? For example, would you say creationism is an ...
10
votes
5answers
5k views

“Known unknown” vs. “unknown known”

I was recently reading a review of Donald Rumsfeld's autobiography. The reviewer cited one of his famous phrases; he quoted it as "unknown known." Now my memory was that the phrase Rumsfeld used was ...
12
votes
5answers
3k views

Difference between “commit suicide” and “suicide”

One of the examples in my English composition book (for learning to write my language's sentences in English) was "Why he committed suicide under such a good circumstance is an unsolved question.", ...
54
votes
10answers
5k views

What's the difference between the adjectives “strategic” and “tactical”?

I recently read this sentence: It was a strategic move rather than a tactical one. I have trouble interpreting it. Can someone help?
2
votes
1answer
228 views

What is the difference between “Prince William and Kate Middleton Marry” and “Prince William and Kate Middleton were married”?

In today’s New York Times (April. 30th) I saw the following line under the caption of “Royal Wedding”: “Prince William and Kate Middleton Marry: Prince William and Kate Middleton were married on ...
0
votes
2answers
999 views

Difference between “keep something on”, “hang something on”, and “leave something on”

I came across three verb + on phrases in today’s New York Times article written by Maureen Dowd and titled “Stripped off Dignity”; it dealt with unpleasant airport pat-down practices. In the ...
4
votes
3answers
412 views

“Two people got hurt and five people died in the tragedy”

Can you say so? In other words, are deaths counted among people that got hurt? Does it make a difference if you say: Two people were injured and five people died in the tragedy. Let's imagine ...
15
votes
2answers
19k views

“X times as many as” or “X times more than”

Suppose John has 5 sweets. Is there any difference between the following two sentences? Jack has 3 times as many sweets as John. Jack has 3 times more sweets than John. I prefer the first ...