1
vote
2answers
56 views

Committee, Association and Assembly — What's the differrence?

I'm confused by these 3 words and I'm not quite sure what the differences are. I know how council, commission and committee differ, but I can't find it for Assembly and Association. I'm using it for a ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

What are the differences and similarities between what “asocial” and “antisocial” mean?

Is an "asocial" guy hostile and destructive or is he just unwilling to interact and avoiding company of others? Is antisocial the same thing? The dictionary says it means opposing established ...
-3
votes
3answers
65 views

“Evocative” vs. “provocative” [closed]

I am starting to use evocative and provocative interchangeably. I would like to understand the difference between these words and when one should be used instead of the other. although the ...
0
votes
3answers
66 views

Difference between “novice” and “newbie” [closed]

I can say "I am a novice in English" or "I am a newbie in English". Is there any difference between these?
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Difference between “Folder version” and “Folder revision” [closed]

I need to know the difference between a "file version" and a "file revision", assuming that they don't have the same meaning, I assume also that a version means that we've modified an existing folder, ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

“brain-cramp” vs “blank-out” [closed]

When mind lapses instantly I call it blank-out. Recently I have come across brain-cramp and it is providing almost same meaning as blank-out. Are both same ? Cramp word is not playing big heavy dice ...
2
votes
4answers
86 views

Being Clever vs Being Wise

A sage is wise. That young woman is clever. Both of them (I think) are good at not getting into unwanted trouble, and both are good at solving problems. So.. Is there a difference between being ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Corresponding vs. appropriate

Let me give you some context first: Germans. We may have similar words with different meanings and use words just because they have a similar spelling. software company, writing software for ...
-2
votes
0answers
53 views

Difference between “lady” and “woman”? [migrated]

Are there differences between "lady" and "woman" ? Google say lady is a polite social woman. But we don't use them just as this. Do we? English isn't my native language so I am better clarifying ...
2
votes
2answers
75 views

“An exclamation” or “An ejaculation” ? Are these words synonymous? [closed]

Exclamations and ejaculations are usually expressions of surprise or anxiety, something said quickly and suddenly. Grammatically they are always interjections and may seem to be the same kind of ...
4
votes
3answers
488 views

“They were seduced” vs. “They were swayed”

I ran across the verb "sway" a little while ago and I was wondering about its usage. See: They were seduced by the low cost of the house. And They were swayed by the low cost of the house. ...
3
votes
3answers
563 views

Difference between “ad hoc” and “impromptu” [closed]

Is there any difference between "ad hoc" and "impromptu"? Can you find sentences where only one of the words is acceptable and the other is not? And where they are interchangeable? What about the ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
votes
2answers
97 views

Upside down vs downside up

Typically when something is reversed or inverted we say it is "upside down", could we also say that it is also "downside up"? For example... "The picture is upside down" could we also say it ...
0
votes
2answers
97 views

Difference between “repress” and “quell” [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between repress and quell? Are they interchangeable?
0
votes
1answer
67 views

“Despising look” vs “despised look”

Peter gave me a despising look. Peter gave me a despised look. Are the two statements above the same? My understanding is that in statement 1, I may have done something that Peter thinks ...
0
votes
4answers
101 views

What's the difference between “title” and “name”?

I'm not sure when it's appropriate to use word "name", and when to use word "title". For example, "file name" feels right, "file title" doesn't; "document name" and "document title" seem ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

Difference between speculation and guessing [closed]

The background to this question is in the comments below this answer on Sci-Fi. Is there a difference between "speculating" and "guessing"? My understanding is that they are pretty interchangeable ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
0
votes
3answers
81 views

Difference in meaning between “booking is amended” and “booking has been amended” [duplicate]

What is the difference in meaning between "booking is amended" and "booking has been amended"?
1
vote
3answers
150 views

Difference between “wedding” and “marriage”

What is the correct usage between the following? A wedding anniversary A marriage anniversary? What differences are there, if any.
0
votes
4answers
112 views

“former” vs “last” as in “my former, only and last husband”

I was reading a book and found this expression: [...] my former, only and last husband. Could anyone tell me what are the differences between former and last in this case? Also, would former and ...
1
vote
1answer
136 views

Simple present or present perfect simple with “WHEN”?

From a native speaker's point of view, are these sentences both gramatically acceptable and equally common in spoken/written English? I'll call you when I get to the gym. I'll call you when I've got ...
3
votes
3answers
176 views

Difference between “larder” and “pantry”

What is the difference between larder and pantry? Is it size? Or content? I found very similar definitions for both terms, something like "a room/place in which food is stored". Which of the words is ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “pure” will(power)?

In English, we use the phrase "sheer force" much more often than "pure force" (Google Ngram). And willpower. What is the difference, in meaning and usage, between the two (and is there a reason for ...
2
votes
3answers
212 views

Is there any difference between “word-for-word translation” and “word-by-word translation” and is the latter actually valid?

First off, some data: According to COCA "word-for-word" has 60 usages, 3 of them are "word-for-word translation". "Word-by-word" has 26 usages, none of them are "word-by-word" (but some with ...
-1
votes
2answers
73 views

coming to the shops or going to the shops? [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? Do you mind COMING to the shops with me? Do you mind GOING to the shops with me?
-1
votes
1answer
83 views

present continuous, be going to, or both? [duplicate]

In Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate (Prodromou, 2005), Chapter 2 covers "the future", "be going to", "present continuous", and "present simple". I put three of the End-Of-Chapter questions ...
-1
votes
1answer
84 views

Difference between “at that time” / “that time”

What's the difference between at that time / that time? When I faced the issue previously, at that time John helped us to resolve it. When I faced the issue previously, that time John helped us ...
1
vote
4answers
79 views

what is the difference between a spy and an informer?

Is a "spy" different from an "informer"? If the answer is yes, what differences are there?
0
votes
1answer
98 views

present continuous or be going to?

In his book, Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate, Luck Prodromou has ruled out the possibility of using 'be going to' to complete the following sentence : 'What .......... you .......... ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

What's the difference between “Conference” and “Meeting”?

See:The meeting will be held in a conference room at 10:00 am. Is there any problem if I change the position of these two words in the sentence like "The conference will be held in a meeting room at ...
3
votes
6answers
799 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
0
votes
3answers
169 views

What's the difference between the words “journey”, “travel” and “trip”?

As they always were interchangeable in an article, I just want to know the difference.
0
votes
2answers
240 views

Difference between mug, jug, jar, etc

When I try to translate the German word "Krug" into English, LEO shows me without further distinction: flagon jar jug mug tankard pitcher But as far as I know, they cannot always used ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Difference between the words of violent criticisms

What is the exact difference between: revile castigate inveigh asperse culminate vituperate vilify In what context are these words used?
1
vote
1answer
69 views

What's the difference between “general” and “generic”?

What is the difference between them? Do they have different meanings? When should I use "general" or "generic"?
0
votes
4answers
152 views

What's the difference between “attendee” and “participant”?

Attendee: Someone who is at an event such as a meeting or a course. Participant: Someone who is taking part in an activity or event. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
1
vote
2answers
350 views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
1
vote
1answer
352 views

What is differences between “Dear and Darling”? [closed]

What is differences between them? Are they similar or not? Dear Mrs. Smith. John, darling, could you pass me the sugar, please? Johnny dear, please listen up. May I introduce my dear ...
7
votes
3answers
190 views

“Criticism” vs. “critique”

What is the difference in meaning between criticism and critique?
0
votes
2answers
136 views

Is there a difference between “keep on doing” and “go on doing”?

Keep on: "to continue doing something, or to do something many times." Go on: "a) to continue doing something or being in a situation. b) to continue without stopping". From Longman Dictionary of ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Difference between “glass” and “shot”

I heard this line in a song: It wasn't a shot of cognac, it was a glass of cognac. Then the crowd listening to the singer started laughing. What is the difference in meaning between these two ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

what's the difference between “Indispensable Amino Acid” and “Essential Amino Acid”?

As I have seen several times of the using of those two words in even the same book. But I don't know what's the difference meaning between those two words.
0
votes
1answer
125 views

“Kafkaesque” vs. “Kafkan”

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives Kafkaesque and Kafkan, or are they synonyms?
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Difference between a “self-serving individual” and “self-centered individual” [closed]

Is being "self-serving" the same as being "self-centered"? While looking for an answer to this question, I saw this previous question on the difference between "selfish" and "self-centered". I ...
-1
votes
1answer
162 views

labour v.s. labourer [closed]

What's the difference between them when I mean "worker"? In other word, which one below is right? Companies can barely find young labours in an ageing society. Companies can barely find young ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What's the difference between “dissatisfied” and “unsatisfied”?

Is there a clear-cut difference between dissatisfied and unsatisfied?
5
votes
3answers
237 views

Limp and Hobble

I have a problem with the word "limp" and "hobble". I do not know which word is appropriately used when it comes to context because I do not know how the words differ from each other. Can we use them ...
0
votes
2answers
285 views

Is there any difference between “student” or “pupil”? [duplicate]

I am a little bit confused, when somebody told me that a student is the same as a pupil. Would it be correct, if I said "He is a pupil of MBA."? Which of the following expressions is the most ...