This tag is for questions about the usage and meaning of mathematical terminology and the names for mathematical entities in English.

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4answers
331 views

What do you call a sequence of repeating numbers

For example, I have a sequence 77777777777 Is there a word in the dictionary to represent a sequence of repetitive/recurring numbers
1
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4answers
274 views

Is 'times it by' or 'minus it by' correct?

I'm always hearing math instructors, and students, use ‘times it by’ to describe multiplicative operations: “…To find the ratio, you times it by one hundred…” To hear other students phrasing ...
3
votes
3answers
101 views

Name for Variable satisfying an inequality with equality

In mathematics we often have statements like a x <= b, where a and b are constants and x is a variable. Now there may be variables satisfying the inequality (that is the statement is true) as well ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Word for something partitioned into 16 parts?

On a two-dimensional Cartesian plane we can naturally subdivide the space into four quadrants at the origin. In three-dimensions, the partition into eight parts are known as octants. In ...
1
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4answers
121 views

What word am I looking for (similar to “subset”)

If... (A) is a subset of (A) (A,B) is a subset of (A,B,C) (B,A) is not a subset of (A,B,C) because order matters. (B,C) is not a subset of (A,B,C) because I only want to compare the front of each ...
8
votes
1answer
170 views

How to punctuate math fractions?

I was doing the Writing and interpreting decimals exercise on Khan Academy and was asked the following question: What is nine and three hundred two thousandths in numerical form? I read it as ...
1
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2answers
373 views

Antonym of all: none, not all, both?

If you ask someone what the opposite of "all" was, most times the answer will be "none", such as the example of "no one" is the opposite of "everyone". There are three antonyms for "all" on ...
4
votes
1answer
282 views

What is the suffix in indexed math symbols

I've been watching some online courses and I'm having a difficulty understanding what exactly are they saying. The courses are scientific in nature and rather often an indexed symbols appear. The ...
0
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4answers
104 views

Let Ω be a domain in/of Rⁿ

What is the correct preposition in the sentence: Let Ω be a domain in/of Rⁿ. Is there a different meaning for "in" and "of"? Both seem to be commonly used, Google gives about 200.000 hits for both, ...
9
votes
1answer
738 views

Use of an Apostrophe in Maths Place Values

In mathematics, when you're discussing the concepts behind different number bases, it's often necessary to refer to a digit's place. For example, in the following "base 10" number (the number system ...
3
votes
5answers
175 views

Is there a word that means “both micro and macro”

I am looking for a word that means "micro and macro". For instance, if I was describing an economic phenomenon that can be observed on both the micro and macro levels of the economy, I could call it a ...
2
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3answers
539 views

What is the name of the Division line? [closed]

What is the name of the horizontal division line? Is there a name for it other than "division line?
3
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7answers
225 views

Find or invent a term for “Completely intersecting minus one”

I'm writing a paper that frequently references regions on a string, and these regions often intersect. I need to succinctly describe regions that almost completely intersect. For example, given the ...
1
vote
2answers
345 views

Which is the correct form: “Parameter set”, “parameters set”, or “parameters' set”?

I have sets of parameters like (1, 2, 3, 5) or (3.14, 2.73, 1.44, 1.73). They are named, but I do not think it makes any difference. Which form is the correct one to call one general case or example ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Term for pertaining to the polar direction

I am discussing a system (in a scientific context) which is described with spherical polar coordinates. This has a radial coordinate r, a polar angle θ and a azimuth angle φ. A diagram can be found on ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Taking a tenner from neighbour

Let's define the first number as "ab" and the second number as "cd". In "ab"-"cd" proces, if "b" is smaller than "d", we add 10 to "b" and reduce 1 from "a". In Turkish, we called it "taking a ...
1
vote
1answer
332 views

“Function defined on/over the set A”

For the mathematically inclined fellows: If f is a function whose domain is the set A, do you say that f is defined on A or over A? Do both prepositions apply here or is the use of one of them ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

A fraction less than something? [closed]

I encountered a question which is phrased: A book store stocks 1/5 of its books as fiction works, and 1/3 less than the fiction books as self-help books. What fraction of books are fiction and ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

How to interpret polyhedron name “Rhombic Hexecontahedron”? [closed]

How to interpret polyhedron name "Rhombic Hexecontahedron"? What prefixes and suffixes that are generic and reusable? What're some examples to "make up" polyhedron names following the same style?
8
votes
1answer
618 views

The Condition Holds vs is Satisfied vs Obtains

In mathematical/scientific texts, conditions that are true (within context) are said to hold be satisfied obtain (the last one was news for me) My question is whether there is nuance in meaning ...
2
votes
1answer
190 views

Circle is to cylinder as ellipse is to what?

What do you call the geometric shape obtained when you give an ellipse thickness? Or in other words, a circle is to a cylinder as an ellipse is to what?
2
votes
2answers
176 views

Correct phrase for “Chain of equations”

In math, one often writes a = b = c = d to prove that a=d. How is such a sequence of equations called in English? In German, there is “Gleichungskette”, but the direct translation “Chain of ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

Understanding smaller parts without understanding what they mean when put together

I am looking for an which adjective/adverb/phrase which refers to understanding all of the smaller components of something without understanding what they mean when put together. "We understand every ...
0
votes
3answers
195 views

What is a word similar to “multiplier” but for addition (or subtraction) [closed]

A multiplier is a number by which another number is multiplied. What do you call a number by which another number is added or subtracted?
0
votes
2answers
58 views

An expression similar to “frame of reference”

I am trying to explain a mathematical point that is used for comparison such that all values are compared to it, like a "frame of reference". I've also thought of "pivot of comparison". Are any of ...
-1
votes
1answer
392 views

Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects? [duplicate]

Need we use sums in the case that the sentence describes the sum of plural objects? For example, “100 centimeters sums to one meter” versus “100 centimeters sum to one meter”. They both seem make ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

dividend/divisor vs. numerator/denominator [closed]

From Wikipedia: In the expression a ÷ b = c, a is called the dividend or numerator, b the divisor or denominator and the result c is called the quotient. What's most common (in the context of ...
1
vote
1answer
322 views

Capitalization and hyphenation for prefixed adjectives derived from proper names in mathematics

In mathematics, it often occurs that the last names of famous mathematicians are used as adjectives with mathematical meaning. Most of these adjectives are written with a capital letter. Then, ...
4
votes
3answers
230 views

Collection of mathematical formulas

What is the correct term for a collection of mathematical formulas in the form of a (small) handbook? I'm looking for a translation of the German noun “Formelsammlung”. Several dictionarys suggest ...
3
votes
2answers
269 views

Is there a term for “distinguishing between different concepts through the use of different, though synonymous, words”?

Background: A friend mentioned that he wanted to organise a board gaming tournament with 21 players. He opined that there ought to be a way to schedule seven 3-player games so that each player plays ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“integer multiple” vs. “integral multiple”

Nine is an integer multiple of three. Nine is an integral multiple of three. Which is more common? If both are accepted, what's the subtle difference between them?
0
votes
2answers
49 views

“books” vs. “more books”

I have a 2nd-grader and I am trying to help him with his math work but I think I might be making things a lot more complicated than they need to be. The question asks: Meg needs _ books to have as ...
12
votes
5answers
1k views

What is an adjective for a very large negative number?

A number that is very large (but not infinite) such as 1,000,000,000,000,000 could be called huge, enormous, large, big, gigantic, etc. A number that is very small such as 0.000000001 could be called ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Is it appropriate to state a mathematical fact with the word “whenever”?

From time to time, in Math textbook, I encounter the statement using whenever, e.g. on page 12 of Horst Herrlich's Axiom of Choice "A has an upper bound in X whenever each pair of elements of A has an ...
1
vote
3answers
225 views

Noun form of “umbilical”?

In Differential Geometry (a branch of mathematics) there exists the notion of an umbilical point. Is there a noun corresponding to the adjective umbilical? Could I write something like "It follows by ...
3
votes
1answer
364 views

Using the word “difference” in the meaning “result of subtraction” taking into account the negative values

The result of subtraction is called "difference". At first glance it might seem that it shouldn't cause an ambiguity over the value denoted by this word; until we stumble upon subtractions that ...
3
votes
7answers
1k views

Alternative to “minuend” and “subtrahend”

In math, I just learned that when performing subtraction, the terms for each number are as follows: minuend − subtrahend = difference I have never heard of minuend and subtrahend before, and I'm ...
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1answer
7k views

What does “evaluate” mean when used in Mathematical problems? [closed]

When solving Mathematical problems, I usually come across with titles like: Evaluate the expression below. Evaluate this: ∜[(log2(48 / 3) + 1)2 - 9] Evaluate the following integral. When I ...
4
votes
5answers
17k views

Why is “a 100% increase” the same amount as “a two-fold increase”?

and is such interpretation the norm? When something went from 4 units to 8 units, most authoritative sources seem to agree with the use of "a two-fold increase", even though what was actually ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why abbreviation for “Definition” as “Def^n” (math context)

I've seen in math and physics lectures delivered in English, that people use to abreviate the commonly very used word "Definition" by "Def n"(Def superscript n). What's the meaning of this n? That is, ...
2
votes
1answer
300 views

Abbreviation or expression for ‘we will prove that’ [closed]

In German mathematics, the expression ‘Zu zeigen’ exists, which translates to ‘to show’. It is used at the beginning of proofs (or the answers to exercises) to state what exactly will be shown in the ...
2
votes
2answers
695 views

Hyphens after the prefixes “non-” and “anti-” in mathematics

Is there a convention when to attach the prefixes non- and anti- to mathematical terms using a hyphen and when without? One uses non-zero but also noncommutative. Likewise for anti-. I no longer ...
3
votes
2answers
911 views

“Hence”, “therefore” and “so” in mathematical proofs

It seems to me that "so" is seldom used in math proofs. Instead, "hence" and "therefore" are used very often, even repeatedly appearing in several sentences in a row. So I wonder if my feeling is ...
1
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3answers
6k views

What's the difference between perimeter and circumference? [closed]

What's the difference between perimeter and circumference when they mean the total length of the boundary of a two-dimensional geometric shape?
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why don't years have commas?

For example, if one asks "what's two thousand plus two thousand", one could write it like this: 2,000 + 2,000 But when one writes the date: January 2, 2000 So why do we put commas when ...
0
votes
3answers
490 views

Five percent VS The five percent [closed]

Five percent VS The five percent. Which one is correct and why? Because i.e. this page exists http://www.thetwopercent.com/ or the famous slogan ;) "we are the 99%.". However, on the official apple ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

How to read parentheses equation [closed]

I have problems with reading mathematical equations in which there are parentheses; could anybody help me? For example: (x−a) (x+b) = 5 (x−a) + 2 (a+10) = z 2 + (10−a) d ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

What do you call the maximum number of recent values used for calculating an average [closed]

A sensor measures some physical quantity (like temperature). The measured value is tapped every 100ms or so. An average is calculated over the x most recently measured values. I.e. with every new ...
3
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2answers
2k views

“Parametrise” or “parameterise” a curve?

In British English, which one is correct? Does one parameterise a curve or parametrise it?
-5
votes
1answer
358 views

What's the word for the property of being divisible by a particular number? [closed]

Example: Since x is even (i.e., divisible by 2), its --word-- is true. Since y is odd, y's --word-- is false. The description suggests 'moddity', but there was another word for it... BTW, I ...