1
vote
3answers
71 views

“Let A be a set, [let] B [be] a group”

Math proves often start with "let". For example: Let A be a set. This is easy. But what about introducing several things in that manner? Let A be a set, B be a group, and C be a number. ...
1
vote
1answer
270 views

“Function defined on/over the set A”

For the mathematically inclined fellows: If f is a function whose domain is the set A, do you say that f is defined on A or over A? Do both prepositions apply here or is the use of one of them ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“Parametrise” or “parameterise” a curve?

In British English, which one is correct? Does one parameterise a curve or parametrise it?
7
votes
3answers
1k views

When do we use “suppose” and when “let”?

As a matter of fact, these two words are used a lot in mathematical contexts. Often, we use them interchangeably; but I do realize that that might not be correct. What should I do about this matter? ...
9
votes
2answers
8k views

Should I use the singular or plural verb in mathematical formulae (“Two and two make/makes four”)?

I remember somebody correcting me once when I said, "Two and two makes four", since the conjunction and would imply the use of a plural verb. They would prefer I said: Two and two make four. ...