This tag is for questions about the usage and meaning of mathematical terminology and the names for mathematical entities in English.

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0
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1answer
36 views

When advertisers say product X has N times less 'thing' than product Y, what do they mean [duplicate]

Here is an example: NESTLÉ a+ SLIM Milk has 15 times less fat than regular toned milk. Source:http://www.nestle.in/brands/nestleaplusslim So the question is this: say regular toned milk has 100 ...
0
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2answers
31 views

Difference between “evaluate as” and “evaluate to”

Does the expression 1+1 evaluate as 2 or does it evaluate to 2? Is one (or both) of the above not proper English or misused in this context, or are they both okay?
-2
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1answer
34 views

using amidst in mathematic [closed]

I use a very formal writing style. If I want to say that I calculate a function between 5 times between each two points, can I use amid these ways? The function f(t) is calculated 5 times amidst ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Is there a word that means “derivative-able”?

I'm just curious, so is there a word that you could use to express that a mathematical function has a derivative?
1
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2answers
45 views

Comma and arithmetics

Should one put a comma before an arithmetic operation? What about long expressions? Example: The final distance is equal to the initial distance plus initial velocity multiplied by time, plus half ...
1
vote
1answer
188 views

Do we have to use ordinals with largest/smallest?

In every-day language, I would say, "Give me the fifth largest pumpkin you have"; that is I would use the ordinal. However, this feels clunky in mathematical texts, especially when reading out loud: ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Where does the word “mean” come from in mathematics? [closed]

For the averages, mean, median and mode I can determine that median comes from latin for mid, mode comes from latin for measurement but cannot find where the word mean comes from. Is it an acronym? ...
5
votes
2answers
341 views

What comes after the ducentiquinquagintasexions?

Hypercomplex numbers that use the Cayley-Dickson construction seem to follow a Latin naming convention related to the size of the algebra (which is always a power of two). As an English.SE question, ...
1
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2answers
92 views

Genitive: with or without “the” [closed]

I would like to know which variant is correct: "Decimal expansion of the first generalized Euler's constant" "Decimal expansion of first generalized Euler's constant" "Decimal expansion of the ...
0
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0answers
36 views

Nonabelian or non-abelian?

I asked this question on Mathematics Stack Exchange (here) but I haven't had any luck so far. Allow me to copy the question: If I wanted to be scrupulous about correct spelling, is there any reason ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

I want to write some mathematical sentences in the English language [closed]

I want to write these mathematical sentences in the pure English language: In this paper, for every vertex a v in G, we find a shortest path joining v and w in G. My proposed sentences are: In ...
14
votes
11answers
5k views

What do you call a cylinder with a hole down the center?

Imagine a 3D cylinder, like a can. Now imagine that almost like an axle spot for a wheel, there's a hole shaped in a perfect circle going down the cylinder. That's the shape I have to figure out the ...
2
votes
3answers
71 views

Can “paraxial” mean “axis-parallel”?

The Wiktionary lists under the meanings of paraxial: (mathematics) Parallel to one or more axes of the coordinate system paraxial rectangle The respective information was added ...
4
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4answers
309 views

Admitting a unique fixed point in math

I've noticed that some of my professors seem to like to use the term admit in the following sense (from the contraction mapping theorem): "If F is a contraction from a complete metric space to ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Why must the cent sign come after the value? [duplicate]

Is it pureley by convention that the dollar symbol ($) comes before the value and the cent symbol (¢) come after? For example $1.50 vs $1 and 50¢ Also would it ever be correct to write a value of ...
1
vote
1answer
302 views

What is the general term for “greater than or equal to” and “less than or equal to”?

We call this equation: A = B We call this inequality: A > B A < B What do we call this: A ≥ B A ≤ B ?
0
votes
1answer
63 views

What is the term for representing whole numbers with integers instead of English words?

For example, "I am giving you the ___ form". Where I am using numeric characters e.g., 1 instead of one. I don't think canonical exactly fits here because the English version is seems to be unique as ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

Why do we have “Coulombic” but not “Coulombian”?

In physics, we have Coulombic interaction. Why do we have "Coulombic" but not "Coulombian"? At first, I think that because the letter b from Coulomb decides which suffix comes after it, but when I ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Word for position and direction

I'm looking for a word that encapsulates both an object's position and direction. Similar words: a "point" has just a position. a "vector" has a direction and magnitude an "orientation" has just a ...
2
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3answers
113 views

Term for numbers that have at least one non-zero significant digit after the decimal point?

So, a number that is nothing but fractions is "fractional". A number that has a whole number and a fraction is "mixed", if you want to call it that. And the portion after the decimal point is called ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Use of “recast” in mathematics

Do we write the relationship recast, OR the relationship recasts? ("s" at the end) y = 3x       (1) Relationship (1) recast y−3x = ...
3
votes
1answer
154 views

Does rational come from ratio or ratio come from rational?

Going through law school we often used the latin phrase ratio decideni - meaning the reasoning of a decision. In this context we took the latin word ratio to mean thinking process. Recently I saw an ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What is the etymological history behind the mathematical “induction” versus the philosophical “inductive [reasoning]”? [closed]

Was talking about it in a (particularly off topic) university lecture on Emperical reasoning (deductive - our logic-math course, vs inductive - "gravity gets taken for granted"). A reason we were ...
0
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1answer
32 views

“conal” vs “conical”

Is there any difference in meaning, usage or frequency between the words "conal" and "conical" within a mathematical context, i.e. when talking about cones?
1
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0answers
103 views

Is there a fraction prefix for “(one-)third”?

I am a mathematician, working with things called 1⁄k-regular polytopes, dubbed thus by Conway. For the case of k = 2, as in ½-regular, it is naturally pronounced and written half-regular. However, I ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Use of articles in mathematical writing

I'm writing a section about some mathematical properties and have trouble with the use of articles (indefinite/definite/no). I could come up with the following variants, but don't know which one is ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

what do you call a table that contains counts of items which have 2 characteristic attributes represented by the rows and columns?

What do we call a table that holds counts? A binning table? Frequency table? Unnormalized probability density table? What if, instead of a table, it's just a list? And what if the table has more than ...
-1
votes
2answers
153 views

How to write this sentence about the square root of a matrix [closed]

Suppose in a math paper I formulated the following sentence: The square root of the matrix A is well-defined, denoted by √A… A friend of mine told me that it sounds not correct.
-1
votes
2answers
125 views

“3 times a is increased by b” vs “3 times a increased by b” [closed]

In my thinking: 3 times a is increased by b: This is a SVO sentence. The subject is "3 times a", the verb is "is increased" and the object is "by b". Therefore the correct form in math is 3a+b 3 ...
-1
votes
5answers
224 views

How to read “A = (πr)²” so as not to mistake it for “A = πr²” [duplicate]

None of the 26 answers given here, or the 5 answers given here mentions any similarity between the pronunciation of E = mc² and A = πr², yet I still remain confusioned as to what distinguishes the ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

What is the name of this kind of chart/graph?

The chart that shows the value of every aspect of an entity. It represent properties of an entity visually, with areas so that we can easily regconize the strong/weakness, etc... Here is an example: ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

To be attained at/on?

I'm writing a math paper, so it would probably be easier to answer this question with some background in math. Assume I have a set of "things" and some function turning these things into numbers. I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
181 views

In math, how do you refer to a subscript or superscript indiscriminately?

In a math or physics context, I would like to say the following: In this equation, we subscript or superscript the variables by "eq" which stands for "equilibrium". The "eq" is added as a ...
1
vote
2answers
218 views

Words for north/south and east/west dimensions?

There is "length", "width", "height", "depth", etc but these words are all relative in respect to the current viewer. The width for one person could be the depth for another person (who is at a 90 ...
2
votes
1answer
200 views

“exact soluble model” or “exact solvable model”, “analytic” or “analytical” solutions

In physical science and math, we encounter some models that can be analytically solved. This means that the properties of models are fully understood and determined by the analytical solutions. In ...
3
votes
4answers
488 views

What do you call a fraction that cannot be written as a finite decimal?

For example, the fraction ⅓ cannot be written, because it repeats infinitely (0.33333333... etc). Is there a particular word for numbers that cannot be written directly, but must be expressed as ...
0
votes
4answers
109 views

Math word for an object not centered at the origin?

Is there a word that can describe a geometric figure such as a circle or ellipse that is not centered at origin (0, 0) in cartesian space? I'd like to find an agreed upon mathematical word, but if it ...
2
votes
3answers
99 views

Binary counterpart to decade

In logarithms, a decade is a range of values from N up to 1o×N. What term should be used to describe a range from N to 2×N, when using binary numbers? A musical octave covers such a ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

How is the sentence “The symbol % is used to represent percent” read?

I have three sentences in my math textbook that use the symbol %. The symbol % is used to represent percent. Usually denoted by the symbol %. Most calculators have a key with the % symbol ...
1
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2answers
42 views

Theorem about uniqueness of solution

I want to write down such a theorem. Theorem. Strong existence and pathwise uniqueness hold for Equation (8). A unique solution is a continuous Markov process. I have a question concerning the usage ...
0
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1answer
99 views

Admits the following description

I have a question about the sentence "The evolution of a process admits the following description". I checked then the phrase "admits the following description" in Ngram Viewer and found no ...
2
votes
1answer
323 views

Why are decimals read as fractions by some cultures?

I find it very strange that the top results on Google for "how to read decimal" give me a very strange way to read them - as fractions. I have learnt to read the digits individually and it makes a ...
0
votes
1answer
342 views

Using “of” before “whether” and general usage of “whether”

I was reading a mathematics text, and I came across a phrase which I thought was written incorrectly. There was a part of a sentence: ... it begs the question whether or not A=B. and I feel this ...
1
vote
3answers
215 views

Words or digits? What is good style for numbers in mathematical writing?

What is considered good style for writing small numbers as words or digits in mathematical texts? I have three concrete examples, are there any differences between those? "M is a matroid of rank ...
1
vote
5answers
645 views

What do you call nested circles that are not concentric?

The circles in the image don't have the same center, so they are not concentric. Is there a word to describe circles that overlap (completely or not) so that enclosed circles are smaller than the ...
7
votes
2answers
273 views

Symbol and sign in mathematics

Mathematical notations are usually called symbols in the large, yet particular symbols seem to be blessed, they are often called signs ('equals sign', 'multiplication sign', ...). Is there a ...
31
votes
2answers
3k views

Rhetoric vs. Mathematics: ellipsis/ellipse, parable/parabola, hyperbole/hyperbola

Do ellipsis, parable, and hyperbole from rhetoric have anything in common with the geometric curves ellipse, parabola, and hyperbola used in mathematics? There are three geometric curves known as ...
2
votes
6answers
255 views

A single word adjective for “having only one interpretation; leaving no doubts”

I am looking for an adjective with a meaning: this is definite, clear, and there's no room for misinterpretation; nothing's left variadic. For example: logical statements have only one, very strict ...
0
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2answers
53 views

The property of a variable that is either discrete or continuous

For example, the arity property of a function might be unary or binary. The (???) property of a variable might be discrete or continuous?
1
vote
3answers
98 views

“Let A be a set, [let] B [be] a group”

Math proves often start with "let". For example: Let A be a set. This is easy. But what about introducing several things in that manner? Let A be a set, B be a group, and C be a number. ...