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7
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3answers
344 views

What is the name of this rhetorical device involving the use of One. Word. Sentences. For. Effect

I am trying to find the name for the rather recent, I think, rhetorical device of one-word sentences used for emphasis and effect. For example: Columnist Ruth Marcus, writing for the Washington Post,...
2
votes
3answers
58 views

What is the name of the term for character facial expressions showing meaning in a play?

Last year I learnt the term for a character's facial expressions showing the audience what they feel, as well as their tone of voice in the stage directions when reading a play. I am currently writing ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Term used for juxtaposing different meanings of the same word

There is a technique used occasionally in (often comic) writing, whereby two different meanings of the same word are combined in a sentence to create a sense of surprise in the reader. My particular ...
7
votes
1answer
8k views

Literary term for referring to a future event in the story line

Is there a literary term for when an author refers to something that is going to happen later? I am referring to two usages of this technique. The first is when an author says "as will be explained ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Is there a difference between storytelling and narration?

I'm preparing a university homework on Foer's "Eating Animals" and I'm supposed to analyse "the use of storytelling to make food meaningful". However, I have a hard time finding definitive references ...
3
votes
2answers
362 views

Is there a term for the device of titling named chapters in a work of fiction?

Does anyone know if there's a term that describes the device of titling chapters in a work of fiction? That is, chapters not simply called "Chapter 1", "Chapter 2", etc., but chapters with unique ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

Is there a word that describes a somewhat subtle, critical remark that an author uses in their writing?

Here are some examples of what I mean: From Kate Chopin's The Awakening: "'You are burnt beyond recognition,' he added, looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

What language technique is 'She is pure guts and steel'?

I am doing an English assignment where I have to identify the language techniques used in a feature article. I am confused as to what technique is used in "She is pure guts and steel." I first ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Term for word used at end of sentence that can be combined with first word of next sentence [closed]

Example: You do not get a free pass. Words will be your downfall. Notice how the end of the sentence, pass, can be combined with the first word of the next sentence, words, to form: passwords. What ...
5
votes
3answers
176 views

Word for Self-Exemplifying Phrase

Depeche Mode's song, "I Promise You I Will," contains the following lines: I'm sorry, but I'm just thinking of the right words to say (I promise you) I know they don't sound the way I ...
0
votes
4answers
3k views

What is it called when comparing two opposite people or things

Can someone please let me know what is the technique called when I compare two people who are very different? In my case, it is Donald Woods when he first meets Steve Biko in the film Cry Freedom. I ...
2
votes
3answers
175 views

“As powerful as just, as beneficient as wise…” Is there a literary device for this phrasing?

In a letter from Lewis and Clark to the Oto Indians, I read: Know that this great chief, as powerful as he is just, and as beneficent as he is wise, always entertaining a Sincere and friendly ...
3
votes
1answer
8k views

Is there a name for when the same word is used at the beginning and end of different phrases/sentences? [closed]

Is there a name for when one phrase ends with a word that starts the next phrase. For instance: life is a peach and cream Or sunscreen in the eye for detail Or (from Dave Eggers' ...
3
votes
10answers
2k views

Is “The Walking Dead” a personification?

Personification (or anthropomorphism) is attributing human features to non-humans. Technically, a dead human is not a human and we give the attribute of walking to the dead. So, Is "the walking dead" ...
5
votes
4answers
292 views

Term for puns in graphics - “Can”cer be beaten

Is there a name for this construction or wordplay? It can be both: Cancer be beaten Cancer can be beaten ("Can" in "Cancer" is emphasized for the purpose) It can be called a wordplay or a pun ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

A pause that may not signal another clause

I want to know if the last line of this stanza (in Frost's Tree by My Window) is enjambed. I want to pause after it, but would like to know whether that's because of the meter, or there can be a comma ...
2
votes
1answer
163 views

Term for: People acting normally while others disbelieve

Is there a name for the literary technique in which some people act normally about a topic or situation, while others (possibly including the reader) are incredulous? For example, at the end of To ...
0
votes
1answer
140 views

Technique for saying the title of the text

Is there a technique for when the title of the text is explicitly mentioned. For example; Cersei Lannister says "In the game of thrones, you win or you die", even in the 5th season of G.O.T. a dance ...
2
votes
4answers
385 views

Euphemism and Colloquialism as Literary/Speech Devices

Is it possible for something to be both a 'euphemism' and a 'colloquialism'? If so, what would be some examples of this?
4
votes
2answers
4k views

What is it called when a character is portrayed opposite the stereotype for comedic effect?

Many character roles have stereotypically defined behavior, e.g. macho soldiers or helpless princesses. Sometimes authors intentionally defy those stereotypes for humor, and to call attention to ...
0
votes
2answers
277 views

What literary device is this? [duplicate]

I have been stumped in characterizing Medbh McGuckian's style of poetry: she often vividly describes the actions of things in her works to imply what they are. For example, within the context of war, ...
6
votes
1answer
340 views

Is there a term when the final spelling of a word is changed for rhyming purposes?

We see and hear it all the time in commercials, advertisements, poetry, jokes, etc... One classic example is this light and very interesting poem by Ogden Nash, where we can find two instances of ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

On literary techniques

Are there any literary techniques in these quotes? “But a man who comes to power with the support of the common people holds it alone and has no one around him who’s unwilling to obey” and “...
2
votes
1answer
135 views

Is there a term for adjectives that don't, at face value, seem to apply to the noun modified?

There's a verse in Bob Seger's song Mainstreet that has this wonderful little seemingly-nonsensical word pairing: There was this long, lovely dancer in a little club downtown; I loved to watch ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

A word for writings about writing

Is there a word for creating something whose subject is the same as the media used to express it. Such as: books about writing, songs about singing, movies about movies, and so on?
0
votes
1answer
255 views

The Difference Between “not unknown to” and “known to”?

An non-native English-speaking friend of mine came across the phrase "not unknown to" as in "tragedy is not unknown to the Kennedy family" and asked the question, "What's the difference between 'not ...
1
vote
1answer
319 views

A word that describes stories with negative and unfulfilling endings?

I'm trying to find a word or phrase that describes the ending to a story where the outcome is generally negative and unfulfilling. At the end of these stories, the protagonist usually makes a decision ...
3
votes
4answers
5k views

What is a term for describing words that sound similar in a pleasing manner when used together?

I want to describe words which produce pleasure effect as they are similar sounding. For example, I want to describe the similarity in the pronunciation of Vinni, Vijji, Vikki Amit, Sumit
-3
votes
2answers
275 views

Simile dilemma: Do leaves “fly like butterflies”? [closed]

Leaves from the ground fly like butterflies . What are the leaves being compared to? flies butterflies ground other leaves
0
votes
0answers
72 views

Is there a literary/rhetorical term for the purposeful elision of the doer (human or otherwise) of an action in a sentence?

Especially with phrasing that implies the object of the action did the action to itself? For example, one might say "Looks like my gift to you went and threw itself in the trash." It's not always ...
6
votes
2answers
301 views

“Lessen, poisoned gulls, ditcher wander hair annulled furry tell a boarder Slipping Booty?”

This is the prelude to an article published in Sports Illustrated magazine on August 17, 1959: Lessen, poisoned gulls, ditcher wander hair annulled furry tell a boarder Slipping Booty? Hoecake? ...
1
vote
1answer
219 views

Usage of the word “Doggedly”

At the end of chapter 16 of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the author states: After that day, a day rarely passed without her drawing the hammer on her slate, and without Orlick's ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

A word for 'independent episodes'

When we have a series of episodes where every single episode depends on and develops from the previous, we may call that a sequel, or maybe a continuum. Now let us say that we have a collection of ...
0
votes
1answer
187 views

Example of Synecdoche? [closed]

I need some examples of synecdoche!! Can someone post a few examples of synecdoche? I found only these- "lend me your ears" and "the hand that mocked".
2
votes
1answer
192 views

What literary technique would this be?

Abandon all logic ye who enter here, because we are about to start talking Lucy. You might want to leave reason and science by the door while you’re at it, you won’t have much call to use either of ...
0
votes
1answer
212 views

What language technique is “I am gone though I am here”

I am writing an essay about Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' and I was wondering what language technique is used in "I am gone though I am here". Is it a juxtaposition, oxymoron or what?
1
vote
1answer
212 views

Word/phrase for a story in which time passes between scenes

Stories like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn often have large time gaps between narration. Days, weeks, or even years might pass between chapters or scenes in stories such as these. What word or ...
1
vote
1answer
429 views

A literary term meaning reversed repetition?

A quote from The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss lists "actors and acrobats, musicians and hand magicians, jugglers and jesters" My first thought on reading it was that "hand magicians and ...
-1
votes
1answer
89 views

Variation(?) on Antanaclasis

US President Obama in his recent annual State of the Union address to the Congress: In the year since I asked this Congress to raise the minimum wage, five states have passed laws to raise ...
3
votes
3answers
226 views

Does the type of play on words in “Some people are immune to good advice” have a name?

On Breaking Bad, Saul Goodman remarks, "Some people are immune to good advice." Similarly, a friend of mine described a weekend as "a celebration of procrastination". Does word play that juxtaposes ...
1
vote
1answer
741 views

What is a word to describe how something bad looks good because it is being contrasted with something worse?

I was wondering if there was any word or terminology for any such literary device that uses this effect.
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Are these hyperboles? [closed]

I have to write a diary entry in the perspective of Romeo about Juliet. We just finished act 1. so are any of these hyperboles ? When she walks outside, nature stops for a second to admire her ...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

It there a literary technique for when authors create a language within their novel? [closed]

Like in 1984 when Orwell creates newspeak? I'm trying to find techniques to analyse his decision to do this...
0
votes
3answers
389 views

Is it acceptable to use “math” in an admissions essay?

I am writing a college admissions essay and would like to get a professional opinion on whether it is acceptable to use the truncated and informal version of the word "mathematics" as "math". I ask ...
5
votes
1answer
533 views

What type of a literary device is this? [duplicate]

A murdering thief or a thieving murderer. I have looked up all possible literary devices, and can't seem to find one...
3
votes
5answers
168 views

literary or rhetorical definition

Looking for single word definition for a question or riddle that seemingly has no answer. Designed to confuse. Not paradox or conundrum. I.e "What is the sounds of on hand clapping?"
5
votes
4answers
2k views

What do you call it when people mix truth and lies?

A common tactic in the deliberate spread of misinformation such as is common in chain emails, is to state something true and easily proven in order to gain the reader's trust, then follow it with a ...
3
votes
1answer
274 views

Word for one character explaining to another character some important points for benefit of the audience

This is not apostrophe (no, not that kind of apostrophe) or anagnorisis; this is when a character communicates a exposition on some aspect of the story's background or context (e.g. how FTL travel ...
1
vote
2answers
481 views

What is the name of this stylistic device?

There is a stylistic device where you begin and end a text with the same metaphor.I'm sorry I don't have a "real-world" example in English, but I'll try to describe what I mean. Let's say there's an ...
36
votes
12answers
3k views

Is there a word to describe a highly desirable cursed treasure?

Is there a single word to describe an object or idea that is so desirable that everyone wants to attain it but once they have it they are immediately cursed? The idea is often used in literature—some ...