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2
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1answer
51 views

What literary technique would this be?

Abandon all logic ye who enter here, because we are about to start talking Lucy. You might want to leave reason and science by the door while you’re at it, you won’t have much call to use either of ...
0
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0answers
18 views

What are some literacy techniques used in here? [on hold]

I was just wondering what sort of literacy techniques are used in this film review? Here's the link: ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

"As powerful as just, as beneficient as wise… Is there a literary device for this phrasing?

In a letter from Lewis and Clark to the Oto Indians, I read Know that this great chief, as powerful as he is just, and as beneficent as he is wise, always entertaining a Sincere and friendly ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

Name of Literary Technique: People acting normally while others disbelieve

Is there a name for the literary technique in which some people act normally about a topic or situation, while others (possibly including the reader) are incredulous? For example, at the end of To ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What language technique is “I am gone though I am here”

I am writing an essay about Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' and I was wondering what language technique is used in "I am gone though I am here". Is it a juxtaposition, oxymoron or what?
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Word/phrase for a story in which time passes between scenes

Stories like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn often have large time gaps between narration. Days, weeks, or even years might pass between chapters or scenes in stories such as these. What word or ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

A literary term meaning reversed repetition?

A quote from The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss lists "actors and acrobats, musicians and hand magicians, jugglers and jesters" My first thought on reading it was that "hand magicians and ...
0
votes
2answers
134 views

What literary device is this? [duplicate]

I have been stumped in characterizing Medbh McGuckian's style of poetry: she often vividly describes the actions of things in her works to imply what they are. For example, within the context of war, ...
3
votes
3answers
108 views

Does the type of play on words in “Some people are immune to good advice” have a name?

On Breaking Bad, Saul Goodman remarks, "Some people are immune to good advice." Similarly, a friend of mine described a weekend as "a celebration of procrastination". Does word play that juxtaposes ...
3
votes
10answers
599 views

Is “The Walking Dead” a personification?

Personification (or anthropomorphism) is attributing human features to non-humans. Technically, a dead human is not a human and we give the attribute of walking to the dead. So, Is "the walking dead" ...
1
vote
1answer
425 views

What is a word to describe how something bad looks good because it is being contrasted with something worse?

I was wondering if there was any word or terminology for any such literary device that uses this effect.
1
vote
0answers
38 views

“She had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.” technique? [closed]

“She had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.” The words are increasing in intensity, is there any literary technique I can use?
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Are these hyperboles? [closed]

I have to write a diary entry in the perspective of Romeo about Juliet. We just finished act 1. so are any of these hyperboles ? When she walks outside, nature stops for a second to admire her ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

It there a literary technique for when authors create a language within their novel? [closed]

Like in 1984 when Orwell creates newspeak? I'm trying to find techniques to analyse his decision to do this...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Variation(?) on Antanaclasis

US President Obama in his recent annual State of the Union address to the Congress: In the year since I asked this Congress to raise the minimum wage, five states have passed laws to raise ...
0
votes
3answers
119 views

Is it acceptable to use “math” in an admissions essay?

I am writing a college admissions essay and would like to get a professional opinion on whether it is acceptable to use the truncated and informal version of the word "mathematics" as "math". I ask ...
5
votes
1answer
253 views

What type of a literary device is this? [duplicate]

A murdering thief or a thieving murderer. I have looked up all possible literary devices, and can't seem to find one...
5
votes
4answers
365 views

What do you call it when people mix truth and lies?

A common tactic in the deliberate spread of misinformation such as is common in chain emails, is to state something true and easily proven in order to gain the reader's trust, then follow it with a ...
3
votes
5answers
131 views

literary or rhetorical definition

Looking for single word definition for a question or riddle that seemingly has no answer. Designed to confuse. Not paradox or conundrum. I.e "What is the sounds of on hand clapping?"
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Word for one character explaining to another character some important points for benefit of the audience

This is not apostrophe (no, not that kind of apostrophe) or anagnorisis; this is when a character communicates a exposition on some aspect of the story's background or context (e.g. how FTL travel ...
1
vote
3answers
324 views

What is the name of this stylistic device?

There is a stylistic device where you begin and end a text with the same metaphor.I'm sorry I don't have a "real-world" example in English, but I'll try to describe what I mean. Let's say there's an ...
3
votes
0answers
50 views

Origin and name for horizontal line hiding date or place name [duplicate]

Does anyone know a) the origins, or b) the name of the convention of replacing dates or place names in 18th / 19th century novels with a horizontal line? I'm not asking for the reasons authors did ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a name for when the same word is used at the beginning and end of different phrases/sentences?

Is there a name for when one phrase ends with a word that starts the next phrase. For instance: life is a peach and cream Or sunscreen in the eye for detail Or (from Dave Eggers' ...
5
votes
1answer
304 views

When the subject of a sentence is the same as the object of the previous sentence

What is it called when the subject of a sentence is the same as the object of the previous sentence? For example: I'm going to Freddy's house. Freddy lives down the block. The block is paved ...
1
vote
1answer
462 views

To say in a threatening way without issuing a threat

Near the end of the movie Mirror Mirror, I heard the following line uttered by the mirror: "Are you ready to learn the price of using magic?" It was spoken as a threat, but the mirror was not ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Is there a technical term for when verbs in a sentence appear as if they have been swapped around? [closed]

Is there a technical term for when verbs in a sentence appear as if they have been swapped around as in the example here? 'her fingers creased in gold [and] her body ringed in folds' In this ...
3
votes
2answers
358 views

Literary device: frequently referenced object which never appears

What do you call an object or a person which is frequently referenced but never actually appears? For example, Godot from ‘Waiting for Godot’?
2
votes
2answers
368 views

Avoiding confusion with multiple use of ibids, how would one do it?

I was thinking and researching about the use of Ibid in footnotes/endnotes etc. and found the following example in Wikipedia: [1] E. Vijh, Latin for Dummies (New York: Academic, 1997), p. 23 [2] ...
3
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2answers
9k views

What is “narrative nonfiction”, exactly? Isn't every nonfiction narrative?

I came across the term “narrative nonfiction” in the New York Times article titled “What should children read?” (November 22). It seems to be a journalist’s and book editors’ favorite jargon from the ...
3
votes
2answers
515 views

Is there a term for metaphors built upon double entendres?

I was thinking deeply about figurative language today, and I read a sentence that must be an example of a specific type of figurative language, but I didn't remember learning about it and couldn't ...
9
votes
1answer
614 views

Searching for a literary term for “if this, then I’m a this” statements

I’m reading Shakespeare’s Henry IV (Part 1) right now and I’m noticing that Sir John Falstaff has a propensity of saying “If this, then I’m a this” sort of statements. A few examples to clarify: … ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

Literary term for an obvious understatement to emphasize excess

I was wondering what the term was for a intentional understatement of an obvious excess to emphasize that excess. For example saying Bill Gates is “doing well for himself”. Anyone familiar with Bill ...
19
votes
12answers
960 views

What is the correct term for a story that sits alongside another one in time and place?

What is the correct term for a book that sits alongside another book in time and universe, sharing some characters and events? Not after (a sequel) or before (a prequel), but parallel. Example: I've ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is a term for describing words that sound similar in a pleasing manner when used together?

I want to describe words which produce pleasure effect as they are similar sounding. For example, I want to describe the similarity in the pronunciation of Vinni, Vijji, Vikki Amit, Sumit
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votes
2answers
242 views

“Lessen, poisoned gulls, ditcher wander hair annulled furry tell a boarder Slipping Booty?”

This is the prelude to an article published in Sports Illustrated magazine on August 17, 1959: Lessen, poisoned gulls, ditcher wander hair annulled furry tell a boarder Slipping Booty? Hoecake? ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Sentence using “hamartia”

Can any one tell me how to use the word hamartia in everyday writing? I have searched a lot but failed to find any sentence using this word. Any help would be appreciated.
2
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6answers
456 views

“commit suicide” In A Literary Way [closed]

They have committed suicide. It sounds too cold. I am not writing a report. They have ended their lives. It sounds too boring. So how can I phrase it such that there is a sense of ...
0
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0answers
51 views

Name of literary device and examples [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a name for inverting word order to accomplish a different meaning? “Some champagne for my real friends, some real pain for my sham friends.” Style of this ...
3
votes
1answer
509 views

What literary device is being used here?

The beginning of prehistoric wars is a disputed issue between anthropologists and historians. Source: http://ask.yahoo.com/20070404.html I was reading that article and I noticed that sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Literary technique from quote in Frankenstein

How much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to be greater than his nature will allow The above quote is taken from Mary Shelley's ...
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vote
0answers
578 views

What is the broader meaning of metonymy in literary criticism? [closed]

I already know the basic meaning of metonymy (e.g. In "Washington passed the bill." the word "Washington" stands in for "the government"). I also know that metonymy is a form of nebeneinander ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What is the literary term used to describe long vowel sounds?

What is the literary term used to describe long vowel sounds? For example in Ted Hughes's "Your Paris" in his Birthday Letters anthology "Eerie Familiar Feeling", what term would be used to describe ...
2
votes
1answer
431 views

Identifying the literary technique

I was wondering if there is a literary technique in the following quote: "Let us be sacrificers but not butchers"
1
vote
6answers
442 views

In literary terms, what's the best word to describe a collection of locations?

I'm translating a book I wrote some years ago from Portuguese to English, and there's a section that describes the locations, spaces and factions from a specific fictional work. Whats the best word ...
2
votes
1answer
317 views

Is there any other literary technique other than metaphor in the following quote?

I'm writing an essay required for school, involving the analysis of texts. “remove the shackles of prejudice and intolerance” I was wondering if there is any other literary technique in the ...
3
votes
1answer
144 views

Suitable description for this type of sentence

Lyrics from The National's Ada Ada don't talk about reasons why you don't want to talk about reasons why you don't wanna talk Is there a word for the structure of this sentence - for me it ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What is it called when a character is portrayed opposite the stereotype for comedic effect?

Many character roles have stereotypically defined behavior, e.g. macho soldiers or helpless princesses. Sometimes authors intentionally defy those stereotypes for humor, and to call attention to ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is there a literary term for the circular nature of a story? [closed]

Is there a literary term for the circular nature of a story, starting in place a, going on to b and c before returning to complete at a again?
5
votes
3answers
374 views

Technique relating environment and emotions/personality

I was wondering what is the technical term for the technique relating a physical environment to the mental state. For example, I am writing about how the dim lighting and cluttered workspace of ...
1
vote
1answer
684 views

A Good Resource (Book, …) For Literary Techniques/Devices? [closed]

What's a good book (Or resource) on Literary Techniques/Devices in English Literature?