Questions about the strange language of legalese.

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Meaning - 'the sword and the purse'

Because it lacks the legitimacy and accountability that come with election and the power that derives from the sword and the purse, the Supreme Court’s authority rests on public acceptance of its ...
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2answers
51 views

“What about” vs. ”what of”

Example from page 75 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: But what of mandatory authorities? Are they as “binding” as the traditional terminology suggests? The answer depends on what ...
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1answer
59 views

disputant vs disputer

Any differences in meaning? The dictionary doesn't explain. Google Ngrams This dispute between the king and the estate of William Bankes, owner of coastal land including Corfe Castle, concerned ...
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1answer
44 views

'cold finality'

In an American case in 1937, Justice Clarkson said this before delivering his dissent: In those after years when this case, elevated to high authority by the cold finality of the ...
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1answer
89 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
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1answer
34 views

Right meanings of 'form'?

When legal decision-makers like Justice Peckham, who are actually ... making a policy or political choice act as if there were no choice to be made—when they treat a policy choice as simply ...
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Which phrase is better?

"In cases where either party is unable to perform the contracted obligation" or "in the event either party is unable to perform the contracted obligation"? I prefer the second but having used "in the ...
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0answers
46 views

“Damage to the undercarriage; damage caused by water”

Does this phrase mean that damages to the undercarriage caused by water is not covered, OR does it mean damage to the undercarriage is not covered regardless of the cause, and that damage to the ...
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43 views

“vest” as a phrasal verb

Rather than memorising the definitions, how could I intuit and rationalise them: vest in somebody/something = to belong to somebody/something legally. vest something in somebody = to give somebody ...