Jargon is terminology unique to certain groups or subjects.

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Flights with all inclusive stay/living, some jargon for this?

Suppose a competition has a prize that contains flight tickets, all food and accommodation. Is there some special term in English to describe it? Flights with all inclusive stay or Flights with all ...
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What is the origin and meaning of “racing to a red light”?

During the third episode of the HBO show "True Detective" the following dialogue is exchanged: Cop 1: "Certain linguist anthropologists think that religion is a language virus that rewrites ...
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Is “on someone's view” standard among academic philosophers?

I've recently seen the phrase on his or her view used by two philosophers to mean "according to him or her" — for example, "On Frick's view, we have a disjunctive definition." The phrase seems odd — ...
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What is the military term for calling attention to yourself, in a negative way?

There is a military term or idiom, which I cannot recall exactly, that essentially means calling negative attention to yourself. For example, you are doing something you know you shouldn't be doing. ...
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In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?

I'm genuinely confused about this because at first I thought a spatula was a cooking tool resembling a flat pallet attached at an angle to the handle that could be used for activities such as flipping ...
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What does the punctuation “//” mean?

What does the punctuation "//" mean? For example: I think I owe myself a THWACK. //ashamed ... //run ... //head down I heard this is related to the comment in the programming ...
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Business Jargon “Blue Ocean Market”

What is the meaning of the expression "blue ocean market" used in business jargon?
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What does “10-4 ” mean?

I could have asked this question personally to my respected colleague who gave me a valuable answer to the question, “Is the ‘tame the infinite becoming an idiom or a popular phrase,” which I posted ...
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Origin of “let's take it offline”

When did people start using the corporate jargon "let's take it offline" (let's discuss that after this meeting in private)? According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the origin of online is from ...
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“Build out” as business jargon

I have noticed an increase recently in use of the phrase "build out" when "build" would suffice. This seems to be mainly an American English phenomenon from what I can see. Here are some examples: ...
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Addressing women with “Sir” [duplicate]

In movies, mostly around military personnel, female officers are sometimes addressed as "Sir" (Sometimes also followed by a "Um, ma'am, sorry..."). What would be the correct usage here if not using ...
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meaning of action flag

What is the meaning of "an action flag" in the sentence below? ...your name has an action flag on it, which is directing me to transfer you immediately to the consul general's chief ...
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“log in to” or “log into” or “login to”

When writing an instruction about connecting to a computer using ssh, telnet, etc., I'm not sure what spacing to use in this familiar spoken phrase: "Log in to host.com" "Log into host.com" "Login ...
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What is a jaffer?

I have been reading the cricket commentary today and came across an unfamiliar word: jaffer. Anderson continues, surely figuring that someone is going to get Morkel out soon and it bloody well ...
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Alternative word to the new verb “onboard” [closed]

Apparently HR folk have taken to using the word "onboard" as a verb, to be used as a synonym for "bring up to speed", as in: We need to onboard new staff to our dynamic way of thinking. instead ...
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59 views

Is it correct to say “a context aware modeling of trust”?

Towards a context aware modeling of trust and access control based on the user behavior and capabilities I was reading some documentation and this phrase stopped me! Is it correct after all?
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301 views

An unlikely but very bad event (technical word)

I'm looking for a word that describes an event or situation that is problematic but unusual. The word should indicate that something is theoretically possible, but so unlikely that you could ignore ...
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1answer
89 views

What. Is. This. Style. Called? [duplicate]

I see this style rather frequently and in the past decade many print advertisements have apparently decided that it makes their sentences. have. more. impact. I can tell that the style is trying to ...
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1answer
49 views

Are there specific terms for “point up” and “point down” pentagram?

Pentagrams can have virtually any orientation but the two most common are "point up": And "point down": Is there a more appropriate term used to distinguish between these two variants?
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Is there a single word for the faith a user of magic has in the efficacy of a magical object or act?

I'm writing about art's function of rescuing, redeeming or validating the artist's experience and suffering. Some of my sources have compared this to the functions of magical talismans and power ...
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Hyphens in verb construction containing prefix such as “re”

In semi-formal business writing in the United States, I often observe that writers tend to add a hyphen between a prefix and the root infinitive of verbs. In many of the cases, the resulting verb ...
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Expression for some special SQL queries

While I'm not native English speaker, I often need to express myself in English. For a week, I have been searching for a term which represents a kind of SQL query: SELECT something FROM somewhere ...
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What's the opposite of nominal in the astronaut sense?

If some sub-system is not nominal, what do they say?
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What is the correct pronunciation of “regex”?

The term regular expression is often shortened to regex. What is the correct pronunciation of the g in regex? Is it like the g1 in gallium, or is it like the g2 in giraffe? I’ve heard it said both ...
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The word for “professional system” or “task system”

I work with software engineering and in norwegian (I'm from Norway) we have a word, "fagsystem", which refers to a software system/application that is specialized to handle a certain kind of business ...
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What does “do a take 5” mean?

The context is “We will always do a TAKE 5 prior to undertaking work”. I have no idea what a “take 5” is. I searched “take 5” on Google but I didn’t find an applicable explanation. Here is the ...
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Sixty-nine callback

In the movie 'Fight Club' I heard the phrase 'Sixty-nined you' for calling back. Is that common in American English or special for New York where you can press the 6 and 9 to call the last incoming ...
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Origin of the term “wizard” in computing

In computer user interfaces a "wizard" is a set of screens that guide the user through a process. Does anyone know the origin of this term? I personally associate wizards with magic more than a ...
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You are standing into danger

On lists of nautical flag meanings (one and another), the letter U means you are standing into danger. I am familiar with the phrase from a sailing point of view - it means something like "if you keep ...
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What does it mean in this context by “Gem”?

From here, I found such a sentence: This Gem won't cover hardware details... Besides, I also found a book named: GPU Gems I could not look up the meaning of "Gem". What's its meaning in ...
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Non-obvious or nonobvious?

I've seen both, even in the same Wikipedia article entry. Is there a right and wrong version, or is either version OK as long as I'm consistent? I'm using the word in the context of patent law, as in ...
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119 views

Is there the word “ideotechnical” in English? [closed]

There's a word that I don’t understand the meaning of even in my mother tongue and cannot find in any dictionary — ideotechnical/idiotechnical — not even sure which one. I would appreciate it if ...
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206 views

Name for this particular part of a boat?

In John Dewey's How We Think, there is an example of someone reflecting on the purpose of a particular part of a boat: Projecting nearly horizontally from the upper deck of the ferryboat on which ...
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Why is so much idiotic jargon used in U.S. business communication? [closed]

I heard part of a similar complaint on BBC World Service this morning. The broadcasted example was a thirty-nine word jargon-ridden answer provided by the Starbucks coffee company's CEO to the ...
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Is domain-specific meaning acceptable/advisable when used in a document directed outside the domain?

Here's the problem. Many common terms in the programmer's lexicon--i.e., used in information communication and in published texts--are identical to everyday words; others are slight 'distortions' of ...
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Just once I'd like a PB & PB

Not sure if that has a special meaning but I heard it in a movie: Just once I’d like a PB & PB. What does it mean? Here is a cartoon:
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Emails or memos claiming to be “From the desk of …”

Some people adopt the affectation in a message, memo or email where the sender is identified explicitly in the header of the message that the sender is shown as being "From the desk of Joe Smith" ...
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1answer
336 views

What are some examples of “zombie nouns and verbs”?

This is one of the New York Times writing rules.I don't know exactly what “zombie nouns” and verbs mean here. Can someone give some examples? Rule 6: Write With Non-Zombie Nouns and Verbs ...
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Who is the authority — scientists, or linguists — on the definitions of everyday words referring to types of animals? [closed]

For instance, biologists these days like to say that the word "dinosaur" is inclusive of modern birds, since birds are descended from dinosaurs. This is consistant with biologists' tendency to ...
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Use of the word 'lawmaker' when referring to elected representatives

Over the last few years I've noticed more news stories referring to elected representatives as 'lawmaker' rather than Senator, Congressman, Member of Parliament or whatever specific title they might ...
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An alternative to “stakeholder”

Here's a sentence taken from an executive memo, "Action item: get feedback from stakeholders on SuperDongle 9000". Is there something that can replace "stakeholder"? The word is not being used ...
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jargon for taking leftover budget funds in one calendar year and using them the next year

There's a term for taking leftover budget funds in one calendar year and using them the next year, in the context of government budgeting. I am having a brain freeze and can't remember it or find it ...
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141 views

Using 'Gravity' As A Verb

Does anybody else use 'gravity' as a verb besides people in mining and engineering? Example: We have to move the tank up the hill so water can gravity to the flotation cells rather than needing to be ...
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249 views

What does “any or any” mean in a legal text?

I have been going through several legal documents lately and have realised that a lot of them use the fragment "any or any" within some sentences. Failing to place a guard or fence or warning ...
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“Plugable” or “pluggable”

When it comes to programming copy edits, there are lots of words that would otherwise be thrown out or replaced. Hive uses a plugable design. Should that be plugable or pluggable? If the ...
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What’s the difference between “tool” and “utility”?

I find these two words appear together often, especially mentioned as tool and utility for the Unix operating system. So I am wondering about the difference between them.
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How did the word “lid” come to mean “poor operator” (in the context of telegraphy and amateur radio)?

This sense of lid is still common today in Amateur ("Ham") Radio (in the United States, at least), usually as "they're a lid", meaning "they're being a rude or unobservant person." It doesn't refer to ...
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Example of sentence using “sang-froid”

In which context should sang-froid be used? Can you provide an example?
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181 views

What is the word for a pair of bytes?

Bit is a portmanteau of binary digit. A byte is 8 bits. A nibble is 4 bits (half a byte). Is there a word for a pair of bytes?