The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

4
votes
1answer
37 views

What is the word for the gesture when someone takes three fingers and kisses it into the air?

You often see this with Italians, especially when complimenting some food they just ate, but it has evolved into a more universal gesture. Take the thumb, index, and middle finger, gather them ...
4
votes
1answer
130 views

What does “We use the formal lei” mean?

There was the following passage in an article written by Jhumpa Lahiliri, 2000 Pulitzer Prize winner that came under the title, “Teach yourself Italian” in The New Yorker (December 7, 2015): “I’m ...
-1
votes
1answer
77 views

A word for source of energy, enthusiasm, etc [closed]

I need an single awesome word for following features - For these features - the group of person or objects filled with lots of energy source of unstoppable energy the one who start with great ...
1
vote
1answer
147 views

Are there any “fake” Italian words used in English?

Now that we've furnished so many interesting words and ideas in response to @Adrian's request regarding pseudo-Gallicisms, why not do pseudo-Italian pseudo-loanwords in English? To paraphrase Adrian: ...
20
votes
5answers
2k views

How did “lobster” mean two different species?

This live crustacean is called astice in Italian. The one on the right is aragosta. They look very different from one another. The Italian dictionary describes the astice as having a deep (intense) ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

One word for “a one-eyed person”

I've given an English children's story to a small group of Italian kids to read and perform. The story is about a boy who changes into a cat and makes friends with a one-eyed next-door neighbour; a ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Can a car be “naked”?

It's a rare event when I can't find the English equivalent for an Italian expression. It's even rarer when that Italian term consists of one word, but in English I have to build an entire phrase. ...
5
votes
1answer
187 views

“farne di tutti i colori” in English

Does anyone know the English translation for "farne di tutti i colori"? It's an Italian expression meaning "do all sorts of things" The literal translation would be: to do something in every colour. ...
5
votes
1answer
468 views

Etymology of “bizarre”?

bizarre n. "very strange or unusual" I know that it (likely) comes from Basque. Does anyone have a certain knowledge of this? I heard that it comes from Italian from some sources, too.
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is a calzone called calzone?

I was just researching its etymology and turns out that it comes from calceus the Latin for shoe! How did Latin for shoe end up as the Italian (and subsequently, English) for a snack? They seem so ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

If I can “fall in” love, can I “fall in” depression?

In Italian we say essere innamorato (to be in love) whereas the English idiom, to fall in love, expresses the idea of abandonment, of letting oneself go. mi sono innamorato = I am in love, and ...
-1
votes
1answer
80 views

How do I translate this italian locution? [closed]

Often in Italian we use this locution: venire meno Now I wanted to translate it and I didn't come with an 'immediate' translation. Somebody knows the English equivalent?
-1
votes
1answer
308 views

What are typical italian mistakes when it comes to sentence construction? [closed]

Sometimes people say to me that my English is kinda like "translated Italian". They don't know how to put that themselves, anyway sometimes my sentences are not constructed in a "typical English way". ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do The Sopranos leave off the last vowel in Italian words?

For example, they pronounce "ricotta" as "rih-gaht", "manicotti" as "mani-gaht", and "prosciutto" as "pro-shoot". I googled this, and according to this post from Chow.com, this is a common thing ...
3
votes
1answer
528 views

Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?

Is there any connection between the term machination and the writer Niccolò Machiavelli or is it just a coincidence that they are so similar? It seems logical because aside from having similar ...
3
votes
4answers
348 views

What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?

The answer isn't off-keyness, although I wish it were. I am interested in the secondary meaning of something being off-key, in the sense that it is irregular or incongruous, for example: "An off-key ...
8
votes
7answers
984 views

How to say succinctly: “An opinion which is ‘shareable’ and agreed upon by many”?

How would you express the notion: ‘overall many would share that opinion’, more succinctly? For example: It is generally agreed upon that "Breakfast is the most important meal of the day". ...
9
votes
1answer
669 views

Why and how did “a sensible boy” become “intelligent and prudent”?

Italians often get confused by sensible and sensitive. If I tell them He's a sensible boy; he studies hard, saves his money, and plans ahead. They are quite bewildered. To them, sensible is ...
1
vote
3answers
289 views

If I measure myself am I only measuring my size?

In Italy when people say they measure themselves, they are not only measuring their height, or their waistlines. Instead they are measuring how well they do something in a challenging or difficult ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

According to me, it was acceptable, but according to him, it wasn't

I once had a piece of written work corrected by a very experienced English teacher who told me that writing "according to me" sounded weird and nobody who was English/British would ever say it. I ...
12
votes
5answers
3k views

In English you have 'above', 'on', 'over' and 'on top of' but in Italian one word, 'sopra', covers all four meanings

In Italian if I were to say, "sopra l'albero" (albero = tree) you might rightly ask: "Yes but where, exactly?" But "sopra" is a great word to learn in Italian, not only is it a very flexible ...
-2
votes
1answer
567 views

What does “incognita” mean? [closed]

American Heritage Dictionary reads: incognita adv & adj, with one’s identity disguised or concealed. Used of a woman; n, A woman or girl whose identity is disguised or concealed. ...