Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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12
votes
3answers
849 views

“Oojakapiv”: what does this word mean?

A lot of people in my family use this word, not regularly, but enough for me to ask what it means. I know it’s not a “real word”, but how come people from different sides of my family use it? It must ...
3
votes
4answers
8k views

“Demonstratable” — a dictionary word, or just a well known hack?

Someone has just pointed out a mis-spelling on my site - demonstratable, as in "demonstratable experience of...". I can't see it in the New Oxford American Dictionary or the Oxford Dictionary of ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a word “dramaticness”?

I want to write the following: This is due to the dramaticness of the day. What other word can I use?
1
vote
2answers
76 views

Is/could “noctophyte” be a word?

Let me preface this by saying that I am trying to come up with an interesting-sounding name for gamedev purposes. I'm looking for a potentially imaginary word that can be given a logical definition. ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Is “whichevereth” a word? [duplicate]

Whichevereth does not appear to be listed in dictionaries. With only a few Google hits, across a selection of informal texts and snippets, it is perhaps used to indicate that the speaker does not ...
5
votes
5answers
11k views

What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself getting mad at people for using it both in ...
6
votes
6answers
505 views

Is “fillet” a different word in “salmon fillet” than in “leather fillet”

In the question "Is there a name for words which are pronounced differently depending on which definition is being used?" it was suggested by two people that when the word "fillet" is used to describe ...
4
votes
4answers
28k views

Is “tnetennba” a real word?

I've seen and heard the word "tnetennba" used, most famously by Moss in an episode of the IT Crowd in which he was a contestant on a fake episode of the TV show Countdown. In this episode, no ...
24
votes
9answers
174k views

Is “actioned” a valid word?

I've just, without much fore thought, used the word "actioned" in the following (example) context, and am now wondering if it's valid (upon a re-read I've decided I don't like the way it sounds, hence ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

Is “amartize” a word?

I am somewhat familiar with the word "amortize" which means gradually depreciating the value of an asset. I could have sworn there is also a word "amartize" which has to do more with proportioning. ...
29
votes
6answers
7k views

Is “legit” a legitimate word?

Is legit an actual word, or is it a slang word that has been shortened from legitimate?
3
votes
1answer
60 views

Local : Global :: Localite :?

Context: I want to indicate people who keep travelling around the world (sometimes as part of their jobs and sometimes to volunteer during a crisis) without settling down at a single country. I came ...
3
votes
1answer
612 views

Name of a word where you can continually remove one letter from the beginning or end

This is possibly off-topic here - please redirect me if necessary I am looking for the name of a type of word where you can continually remove one letter from the start or end of the word, until ...
1
vote
3answers
91 views

I'm looking for a word similar to an abstract concept

I'm looking for a word to describe when you are aware that something is real, however because you've never experienced said-thing firsthand, the thought of the thing seems like an abstract concept ...
5
votes
4answers
374 views

What is the established antonym for “confluent”?

I am not sure if I can use "diffluent" as it sounds incorrect to me even though it has a dictionary reference. Edit: Is the following sentence correct? Consecutive droughts led to the ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “conservativism” a word?

I know that "conservatism" is the more commonly used term, but is "conservativism" a less preferred, but legitimate word, or just a misspelling? www.dictionary.com has "conservativism", but I'm not ...
10
votes
3answers
852 views

Is “to anagram” an established verb?

To his amusement, Jason realized that the words Madam Curie anagrammed to Radium Came. Is the above sentence idiomatic? I am not sure if I can use anagrammed to. If this is inacceptable, what is ...
3
votes
2answers
106 views

“unaccept” Is it a correct word?

Many a times I used the word "unaccept". But everytime our system shows redline (spellcheck). I believe it is the opposite of "accept", correct? If its a mistake, what should I use?
19
votes
6answers
25k views

Is “curiouser” in fact a word (like in the famous phrase “curiouser and curiouser”)?

Is curiouser, in fact, a word?                                 (Yes, this question is very short, but that’s really all I need to ask.)
0
votes
3answers
54 views

Word that describes a 'noun that can be used as an example'?

In my native language, there is a word that is usually said to exceptional people. It is an adjective that means, for example, that you are so great, you could be made an example for others. To make ...
85
votes
11answers
54k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
3
votes
7answers
109 views

What word means both “advantages and disadvantages”?

So I am writing an essay and I can't find the word I want to use. The sentence says: When I travelled to England there were pros and cons. The sentence doesn't sound right and if I change it to: ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

Is “extrapolability” an existing english word?

I used extrapolability in a Microsoft Word 2010 document and spell checker didn't recognized it. Being a non-native English speaker I wasn’t sure whether it's a real word. Searching for it in Google ...
19
votes
9answers
2k views

How do I express “clockwisality”?

Is "clockwisality" a valid word for discussing whether something is clockwise or anti-clockwise? If not, what words if any can express this? For example, In the context of the anime "Bleach", ...
2
votes
2answers
98 views

Is “illitate” a real word, and what is its etymology?

I encountered this word while playing QuizUp today, and did a search for it. However, no major dictionaries listed this word, and Google seemed to only turn up a couple of sites. This is a pity, as I ...
22
votes
5answers
9k views

How popular is the word “cromulent”? If I use this word in conversation with native speakers, doesn’t it look out of place?

In today’s post, “What’s the antonym for recommend?” an answerer answered "I discourage the blue sweater" sounds perfectly cromulent.” As I am utterly unfamiliar with the word, “cromulent,” I looked ...
9
votes
3answers
22k views

Does the word “skyfall” (or “sky falls”) exist in English?

I found the word, “skyfall” being used in the article of April 18 Nikkei.com. under the title, “What the collapse of the gold bubble tells” with the following lead copy “International commodity ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “payless” synonym of “free”?

Does "payless" mean "for zero price", and "free" (as in beer)? I searched the dictionaries but could not find the word. I also wonder whether "cost-free" means the same.
12
votes
3answers
890 views

Is 'compatriate' really an English word?

I recently saw the word 'compatriate' used in a newspaper article. Upon looking it up, suspecting a typo (or even an eggcorn: it is easy to see how compatriot would be mixed-up with expatriate etc.), ...
12
votes
2answers
4k views

If I can say “videos”, may I also say “audios”?

Audio and video seem to me very similar words by usage. I often hear the plural form for video, but is there a plural form for audio? Can I say audios? I've never heard it being used.
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Does the word 'incrementation' exist?

An example: "To increment a variable makes an incrementation". One language wiki says it does, while MS Word and several dictionaries say there is no such word.
7
votes
4answers
116k views

What is the correct word to use instead of else’s?

If I am trying to say “That problem that belongs to someone else,” then what is the correct word to use in this sentence: That is someone else’s problem. My spell checker says else’s and elses ...
7
votes
3answers
407 views

Is ‘USAers’ just an ordinary English word today?

I saw the word, ‘USAers’ in the lead copy of Reuter’s news titled ‘Gippered’ in Time magazine (September 6), which says: “More than 1/3 of USAers say they are worse off under Bam. Warning-sign ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Is “prayerlike” a word? [closed]

It's included the Merriam-Webster dictionary. I'm just curious if it is acknowledged as a proper form of "prayer."
19
votes
3answers
33k views

Is “misconfigured” a word?

I use the word "misconfigured" all the time, but MS Word, Chrome, and the two dictionaries I checked don't list it as a word. I'm going to keep using it instead of "configured incorrectly" because I ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word? [duplicate]

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is 'acronymise/ze' a word? Is it used only colloquially, if at all?

I just sent a text to a friend, who didn't understand an acronym I used for a game: "Ah, I said it in a previous text so thought it was ok to abbreviate it." Though, since it was an acronym I ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “yearslong” a word?

The New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
14
votes
10answers
43k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
3
votes
3answers
401 views

Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word?

Usage: "I would not like to eat that pie as it looks all festy since you dropped it on the ground." Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word? Also, is it used elsewhere in the world? ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Why doesn’t autocorrect software like “unauthorises”?

I was writing some documentation and trying to write a sentence that ran like this: It then unauthorises the transaction. I soon realised this wasn't a word, and it kept correcting this to ...
7
votes
4answers
16k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
0
votes
5answers
3k views

Difference between misfunction and malfunction

Difference between misfunction and malfunction? Is misfunction a proper English word? If it is, what's the difference between the two above?
10
votes
1answer
4k views

UK English: Is “dived” a valid word?

Proofing a manuscript, I found this in the middle of a chase scene: Spotting an opening, I dived into it and was horrified to find it was a dead end. Is “dived” a valid past tense of the verb ...
4
votes
6answers
3k views

Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?

I am working on a project where I need to be able to distinguish between one who is offering something for rent, and one who is renting from someone. The phrases used need to be short and concise. ...
0
votes
3answers
7k views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
12
votes
4answers
14k views

Is “embiggen” considered a formal or slang word?

If my memory serves me correctly, I first encountered the word embiggen a year or so ago. I thought it seemed odd, but in context, the meaning was quite obvious. Since that time I've seen this word ...
16
votes
7answers
13k views

Is “kinda” a word?

I've used "kinda" as a word basically meaning "kind of" just run together. I wouldn't use it formally, but I noticed that Microsoft Word's spellchecker says that it isn't a word. I searched some and ...
79
votes
3answers
8k views

Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
0
votes
3answers
432 views

A real-word synonym for the non-word “trustedness” [closed]

I always thought that trustedness was a word, but apparently it isn't. What's a real word that means the same thing, namely the quality of being trusted? Note that this is a different meaning from ...