Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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13
votes
10answers
37k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
3
votes
3answers
292 views

Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word?

Usage: "I would not like to eat that pie as it looks all festy since you dropped it on the ground." Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word? Also, is it used elsewhere in the world? ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Why doesn’t autocorrect software like “unauthorises”?

I was writing some documentation and trying to write a sentence that ran like this: It then unauthorises the transaction. I soon realised this wasn't a word, and it kept correcting this to ...
5
votes
4answers
13k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
0
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between misfunction and malfunction

Difference between misfunction and malfunction? Is misfunction a proper English word? If it is, what's the difference between the two above?
10
votes
1answer
3k views

UK English: Is “dived” a valid word?

Proofing a manuscript, I found this in the middle of a chase scene: Spotting an opening, I dived into it and was horrified to find it was a dead end. Is “dived” a valid past tense of the verb ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Is “extrapolability” an existing english word?

I used extrapolability in a Microsoft Word 2010 document and spell checker didn't recognized it. Being a non-native English speaker I wasn’t sure whether it's a real word. Searching for it in Google ...
4
votes
6answers
1k views

Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?

I am working on a project where I need to be able to distinguish between one who is offering something for rent, and one who is renting from someone. The phrases used need to be short and concise. ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word?

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in ...
23
votes
8answers
161k views

Is “actioned” a valid word?

I've just, without much fore thought, used the word "actioned" in the following (example) context, and am now wondering if it's valid (upon a re-read I've decided I don't like the way it sounds, hence ...
0
votes
3answers
6k views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “conservativism” a word?

I know that "conservatism" is the more commonly used term, but is "conservativism" a less preferred, but legitimate word, or just a misspelling? www.dictionary.com has "conservativism", but I'm not ...
4
votes
2answers
242 views

Is “fillet” a different word in “salmon fillet” than in “leather fillet”

In the question "Is there a name for words which are pronounced differently depending on which definition is being used?" it was suggested by two people that when the word "fillet" is used to describe ...
2
votes
3answers
11k views

Is “tnetennba” a real word?

I've seen and heard the word "tnetennba" used, most famously by Moss in an episode of the It Crowd in which he was a contestant on a fake episode of the TV show Countdown. In this episode, no ...
10
votes
4answers
12k views

Is “embiggen” considered a formal or slang word?

If my memory serves me correctly, I first encountered the word embiggen a year or so ago. I thought it seemed odd, but in context, the meaning was quite obvious. Since that time I've seen this word ...
16
votes
7answers
11k views

Is “kinda” a word?

I've used "kinda" as a word basically meaning "kind of" just run together. I wouldn't use it formally, but I noticed that Microsoft Word's spellchecker says that it isn't a word. I searched some and ...
77
votes
3answers
7k views

Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
0
votes
3answers
387 views

A real-word synonym for the non-word “trustedness” [closed]

I always thought that trustedness was a word, but apparently it isn't. What's a real word that means the same thing, namely the quality of being trusted? Note that this is a different meaning from ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

Is “preciser” a valid comparative of “precise”?

I encountered preciser as a comparative of precise and thought it was incorrect. However, some reputable online dictionaries (1, 2) return hits for "preciser". But they do not explicitly list the ...
2
votes
5answers
6k views

Is 'disabilitated' a real word?

I think not, but look on this Wikipedia link about parental leave in different countries, scroll down to the large table and look under Romania. I don't think this is a real word, I tried doing an ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Is 'metacogniscent' a word?

I was watching this video and around the 1:05 minute mark the girl said 'metacogniscent', but I'm wondering whether or not that actually is a word, and if so; did she use it correctly (from what I've ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
-1
votes
4answers
7k views

Has anyone here ever used the word “professionality”? (Or is it even a word?) [closed]

I've heard the owner of our school say the word twice. Urban Dictionary even has a definition for it: Professionality: The art of maintaining a professional appearance and attitude while projecting a ...
10
votes
7answers
94k views

Are “w/o”, “w/”, “b/c” common abbreviations in the US?

I remember when staying a few months in the US years ago that I saw some people using the abbreviations below. However, I can't exactly remember in which contexts I encountered them, (whether I saw my ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Is “preference” a recently verbed noun?

Apple TextEdit is giving a red line underneath "preferenced", as if it's not a valid word. Wiktionary describes "preference" as being a verb as well as a noun. Is it a recently verbed noun that's ...
1
vote
1answer
196 views

Pneumonic or Mnemonic? [closed]

So my English teacher gave us some work and we had to write down 'pneumonics' for some words. I'm fairly sure it's spelt 'mnemonic.' Who's correct? Edit: The usage being the "memory" words, for ...
1
vote
5answers
3k views

Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?

I want to create a poster titled "An Incomplex Introduction to Complexity-based Cryptography." As you see, it contrasts the words incomplex and complexity. (Words like simple or easy do not provide ...
69
votes
10answers
44k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “irritance” not a word?

I thought the word irritance was a word — but it isn’t one according to Google and my dictionary. It sounds correct; what is the word I should use? By irritance I mean something that’s being ...
9
votes
4answers
1k views

Is versionize a real word?

Is the word "versionize" a real word or is it a form of bastardization of English? Additional Info: I came across this word in a software feature tracker. The feature called for something in the ...
4
votes
3answers
306 views

bemustached versus mustached

I’ve just read an article in The Huffington Post in which the phrase “bemustached 26-year-old” was used: Sex and sword swallowing beg some pretty obvious comparisons, but the similarities aren’t ...
4
votes
8answers
4k views

Real word for “equippable”

Equippable, while not a really a word, seems to be accepted by the gaming community as a term for this can be equipped. Is there a more appropriate word which is real, singular and essentially means ...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

Is “weightage” an English word?

Is weightage an English word? We use it a lot in India, but I couldn't find it in my Oxford Dictionary.
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Is “uncollaborative” a word?

I am describing a process as being antithetical to collaboration. To clarify, I'm referring to its quality as being "not naturally collaborative", not "actively anti-collaboration" Is ...
3
votes
2answers
285 views

Physical object, carried be a person, that represents an encumbrance

I believe a word currently exists that is used as a metaphor to mean something similar to, "a person is (willingly?) carrying a physical object, but there is no benefit to carrying (or transporting) ...
2
votes
2answers
196 views

Could `impliant` be a proper word, meaning opposite of `pliant`?

We have the word impliable meaning the opposite of pliable, but there is no dictionary opposite of pliant. (Shorter OED, Apple Dictionary on Mac, dictionary.reference.com, ...
7
votes
5answers
8k views

What does ‘shpritz’ mean?

I came across the word shpritz in the following sentence of a New York Times article (May 12th) titled, "At 100, Still a Teacher, Quite a Character": At 100 years old, Ms. Kaufman is still ...
19
votes
5answers
2k views

Is “princessship” a real word? Are there any other words which have the same letter 3 times consecutively?

One of my friends argues that princessship is the only word which has 3 identical letter comes together (s) ,but I think there is no word such as princessship. Can anyone tell me whether this is a ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

One-letter words in English language

The original question that came to my mind was "How many one-letter words are there in English language?". But of course, I did some research and found out there are three: A – an indefinite ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
1
vote
5answers
944 views

Does the word 'incrementation' exist?

An example: "To increment a variable makes an incrementation". One language wiki says it does, while MS Word and several dictionaries say there is no such word.
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is ‘Yes-ish’ a perfect alternative to Yes, or is it 'Yes ‘on condition’? Is it received English?

I found a word ‘Yes-ish’ in the answer (from PLL) to my question about the meaning of ‘Stuck to the script’ I posted today. As it is quite new to my ear, I consulted with Wikipedia before logging out ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word? [closed]

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is there such a word as staticness?

I want to use the word staticness but can't find it on a dictionary. I've seen it though been used in my google search.
16
votes
6answers
3k views

Antonym for “discombobulate”

I'm looking for a good antonym to discombobulate. I'm aware that the word is made-up American slang and as such there is no such thing as to be combobulated. If a person is anything but ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
5
votes
5answers
570 views

Can one ever say for certain a word does not exist? [closed]

Can it ever be concluded that an alleged word is not actually a word? Obviously, if a word is not in a particular dictionary, it does not mean the word is any less of a word than the ones that do ...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

Can the word mnemonic be used adverbally?

A mnemonic is a memory device for reducing something diverse and complicated to an easily -remembered pattern. For example, for the order of planets in the solar system, I learned as a boy the ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Term for organization being sponsored — “sponsee”? [duplicate]

I have seen a few sponsorship agreements and in one of them the term "sponsee" was used to define the organization being sponsored. The context was a company who sponsors a local team. The agreement ...