Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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1
vote
4answers
83 views

“corollarily” or equivalent?

A corollary in mathematics is a useful side-effect (with other related meanings, but as it pertains to this question, that's the relevant definition to keep in mind). I want to use the word ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
21
votes
9answers
55k views

Is “receival” a valid word for the act of receiving something?

In the course of reviewing a standard operating procedure, I came across the subheading: "Receival, Costing and Charging of Work". I immediately began to doubt whether the word "receival" was a ...
2
votes
2answers
201 views

Is 'biasedness' a real word?

I am curious about the usage of word biasedness, I am unable to find it in Oxford's advance learners dictionary but on the internet. When tried to consult some expert, he said that it's a colloquial ...
16
votes
4answers
16k views

Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

Is reusal an English word? [closed]

Is the word "reusal" part of the English language? For example, given this sentence: ROS tries to facilitate the operation, development and code reuse of robot systems by organizing the parts of ...
9
votes
5answers
14k views

“Smooths” versus “Smoothes”

I am interested in the rapid rise (since about 1993) in frequency of the spelling smoothes as against smooths. An Ngram Viewer graph tracking the frequency of usage of the two words from 1800 to ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Is “narcotraffic” a real word?

I know the meaning but does this word actually exist in English? Should I use it in a formal paper?
0
votes
1answer
121 views

Is “annoyedly” a word? [closed]

I want to say: "Michael annoyedly turned to face his brother." I haven't found any solid evidence that the word "annoyedly" is an actual word, but I like the way it sounds for some reason. How wrong ...
4
votes
5answers
427 views

Is there a word “issual”?

I have used and come across the phrase "issual of tickets" but when recently writing something my Word dictionary tells me that "issual" is not an actual word. Is that the case?
28
votes
5answers
3k views

Is “legit” a legitimate word?

Is legit an actual word, or is it a slang word that has been shortened from legitimate?
0
votes
1answer
118 views

“Umbrella” as a verb? [duplicate]

One of the meanings of umbrella is a term for other things. So, is it possible (yet) to use umbrella as a verb? To umbrella something? Perhaps an umbrella'd issue? I saw someone used "umbrellered" ...
0
votes
1answer
146 views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
8
votes
3answers
6k views

Does the word “skyfall” (or “sky falls”) exist in English?

I found the word, “skyfall” being used in the article of April 18 Nikkei.com. under the title, “What the collapse of the gold bubble tells” with the following lead copy “International commodity ...
0
votes
1answer
129 views

Is “ignorably” a word?

I would like to use ignorably as the adverb of ignorable but I am not sure whether this is correct. I did not find ignorably in any online dictionary. To give the context: Normally, you cannot ignore ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Adverbial form for a common swear word

Is shittly a word (and if so, how many t's does it have?) or do I have to use shittily?
1
vote
0answers
73 views

Can't , can not and cannot [closed]

Can't, can not and cannot is a bit confusing. I know that can't and can not are both grammatically correct. Is cannot a real word? Is it grammatically correct? Should it be written as one word or ...
5
votes
7answers
190 views

Is “unredactable” a word?

I googled it and even though it's been used on the Web, I can't find any entries for it on online dictionaries. If it's not a real word, then is there a good equivalent? The context is a record ...
2
votes
5answers
13k views

Is “That’ll” a real word?

Is the contraction from that will to that’ll an actual word or not?
0
votes
2answers
818 views

Has anyone here ever used the word “professionality”? (Or is it even a word?)

I've heard the owner of our school say the word twice. Urban Dictionary even has a definition for it: Professionality: The art of maintaining a professional appearance and attitude while projecting a ...
1
vote
4answers
950 views

'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
3
votes
6answers
8k views

Are “w/o”, “w/”, “b/c” common abbreviations?

I remember when staying a few months in the US years ago that I saw some people using the abbreviations below. However, I can't exactly remember in which contexts I encountered them, (whether I saw my ...
29
votes
8answers
17k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (ie it's more performant). Is ...
4
votes
6answers
3k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Speeded vs. Sped [closed]

I think "speeded" may have been the appropriate past-tense form for "to speed" in the past, but I wonder if it is still considered the correct form. In spoken English, one usually hears "sped" to ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself hating people for using it both in English ...
3
votes
4answers
4k views

“Demonstratable” — a dictionary word, or just a well known hack?

Someone has just pointed out a mis-spelling on my site - demonstratable, as in "demonstratable experience of...". I can't see it in the New Oxford American Dictionary or the Oxford Dictionary of ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “noncompatible” a legitimate synonym of “incompatible”?

I'm working with someone who uses noncompatible often in correspondence. The confusion may be due to English being a second language for them. I think they should be using incompatible instead. Is ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Can I use “linkography” instead of “bibliography” when referring to web links?

I’m writing a piece of documentation and I want to add the links I'm referring to at the bottom of my document. Since they are links and not books, I think the section title should not use the word ...
-1
votes
2answers
80 views

Is subaccount one word?

I looked at the Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries online and they don't contain this word. But typing it into google takes me to the Merriam Webster definition. So does this just come down to taste? ...
3
votes
3answers
32k views

Can “casted” be the past tense of “cast”?

'The Hindu,' an Indian daily, reports: Leader of Opposition in Rajya Sabha Arun Jaitely casted his vote at Chimanbhai Patel Institute opposite Karnavati club. Does the verb cast has a form as ...
3
votes
2answers
279 views

Is “kekeke” considered an English word?

"kekeke" is somewhat of an alternative to "hehehe" or "huehuehue". From Urban Dictionary: This is an onomatopoeia for laughter. Its origin is the Korean onomatopoeia ㅋㅋㅋ, in which ㅋ stands for the ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “jux” a real word?

Urbandictionary.com says it means: To rob. Verb. Present tense of juxt. It has 342 votes but I can't find any evidence of actual usage on a google or COCA search.
4
votes
5answers
5k views

Why is “ain't” not listed in dictionaries?

Google finds 52,000,000 matches for ain't but non-natives simply can't look up this word. Wiktionary isn't helpful. Is it some kind of 'wildcard' for "am/is/are not"?
1
vote
1answer
97 views

Is 'acronymise/ze' a word? Is it used only colloquially, if at all?

I just sent a text to a friend, who didn't understand an acronym I used for a game: "Ah, I said it in a previous text so thought it was ok to abbreviate it." Though, since it was an acronym I ...
11
votes
4answers
772 views

What does “randomically” mean?

I've just read an O’Reilly book and encoutered the word randomically. I highly suspect this is a made up word, but a quick google found it in use here, here, and here. Is this some obscure technical ...
2
votes
4answers
4k views

Is 'disabilitated' a real word?

I think not, but look on this Wikipedia link about parental leave in different countries, scroll down to the large table and look under Romania. I don't think this is a real word, I tried doing an ...
0
votes
2answers
269 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
-1
votes
2answers
733 views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
6
votes
4answers
14k views

Is “solutioning” a correct word?

My Outlook flags the word "solutioning" as a spelling mistake. According to Urban Dictionary : solutioning: A word many business people misuse to describe the process of creating a solution. ...
27
votes
9answers
79k views

Is “fastly” a correct word?

Slow has the adverb slowly. I tend to use fastly as the adverb for fast. However, it is underlined in most spell checkers I use, which makes me wonder about the existence of this word. Is fastly a ...
7
votes
4answers
7k views

Is the word “representativity” possible?

I found natural to use the word "representativity" (with regard to a sample population of a survey), but my dictionary does not agree with me. Is "representativity" a valid construction?
1
vote
5answers
3k views

Correctness and spelling of “misscheduled”

I'm sure I've heard the word misscheduled used multiple times in my life. But just now, my spell checker threw a fit. Since I wasn't sure if it should be misscheduled, mis-scheduled, or mischeduled ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

Is funner a word? [duplicate]

I am constantly told "funner" is not a word. Even Google auto corrects. Yet "funner" is used very often in spoken English with people I meet. Is funner a word? If not why? What causes it to not be ...
3
votes
7answers
2k views

Real word for “equippable”

Equippable, while not a really a word, seems to be accepted by the gaming community as a term for this can be equipped. Is there a more appropriate word which is real, singular and essentially means ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Adverb for “friendly” [duplicate]

Some adjectives already end in -ly, e.g. friendly, lovely, silly, lonely. How do I form the corresponding adverb? For example: Sara is a friendly girl. She talks to me [adverb corresponding to ...
-2
votes
1answer
539 views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
3
votes
1answer
119 views

Using pond as a verb to describe the formation of puddles

"The tenant complained that water is ponding in the parking area." or, "Due to the ponding of water in the lower lying areas, mosquitoes became a nuisance." "ponding" is not accepted by spellcheckers ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Can “conversant” be a noun?

Googling amongst the world's online dictionaries produces conflicting results, but on the whole indicates that the answer is "no". However, it feels so natural to say: The conversants conversed. ...