Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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2
votes
2answers
115 views

Could `impliant` be a proper word, meaning opposite of `pliant`?

We have the word impliable meaning the opposite of pliable, but there is no dictionary opposite of pliant. (Shorter OED, Apple Dictionary on Mac, dictionary.reference.com, ...
7
votes
5answers
7k views

What does ‘shpritz’ mean?

I came across the word shpritz in the following sentence of a New York Times article (May 12th) titled, "At 100, Still a Teacher, Quite a Character": At 100 years old, Ms. Kaufman is still ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
19
votes
5answers
2k views

Is “princessship” a real word? Are there any other words which have the same letter 3 times consecutively?

One of my friends argues that princessship is the only word which has 3 identical letter comes together (s) ,but I think there is no word such as princessship. Can anyone tell me whether this is a ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

One-letter words in English language

The original question that came to my mind was "How many one-letter words are there in English language?". But of course, I did some research and found out there are three: A – an indefinite ...
1
vote
3answers
934 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
0
votes
5answers
170 views

Does the word 'incrementation' exist?

An example: "To increment a variable makes an incrementation". One language wiki says it does, while MS Word and several dictionaries say there is no such word.
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is ‘Yes-ish’ a perfect alternative to Yes, or is it 'Yes ‘on condition’? Is it received English?

I found a word ‘Yes-ish’ in the answer (from PLL) to my question about the meaning of ‘Stuck to the script’ I posted today. As it is quite new to my ear, I consulted with Wikipedia before logging out ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
0
votes
2answers
994 views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word? [closed]

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
0
votes
1answer
287 views

Is there such a word as staticness?

I want to use the word staticness but can't find it on a dictionary. I've seen it though been used in my google search.
10
votes
1answer
2k views

UK English: Is “dived” a valid word?

Proofing a manuscript, I found this in the middle of a chase scene: Spotting an opening, I dived into it and was horrified to find it was a dead end. Is “dived” a valid past tense of the verb ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Difference between misfunction and malfunction

Difference between misfunction and malfunction? Is misfunction a proper English word? If it is, what's the difference between the two above?
15
votes
6answers
2k views

Antonym for “discombobulate”

I'm looking for a good antonym to discombobulate. I'm aware that the word is made-up American slang and as such there is no such thing as to be combobulated. If a person is anything but ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
5
votes
5answers
368 views

Can one ever say for certain a word does not exist? [closed]

Can it ever be concluded that an alleged word is not actually a word? Obviously, if a word is not in a particular dictionary, it does not mean the word is any less of a word than the ones that do ...
4
votes
1answer
57 views

Can the word mnemonic be used adverbally?

A mnemonic is a memory device for reducing something diverse and complicated to an easily -remembered pattern. For example, for the order of planets in the solar system, I learned as a boy the ...
9
votes
4answers
831 views

Is versionize a real word?

Is the word "versionize" a real word or is it a form of bastardization of English? Additional Info: I came across this word in a software feature tracker. The feature called for something in the ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Term for organization being sponsored — “sponsee”? [duplicate]

I have seen a few sponsorship agreements and in one of them the term "sponsee" was used to define the organization being sponsored. The context was a company who sponsors a local team. The agreement ...
5
votes
2answers
130 views

Why “pastime” but not “passtime”?

pastime n. An activity that occupies one's spare time pleasantly: Sailing is her favorite pastime. [TFD] Etymonline says that it is from pass + time: late 15c., passe tyme "recreation, ...
-1
votes
2answers
3k views
59
votes
12answers
27k views

Is “I'd've” proper use of the English language?

While reading a book, I came across the word I'd've, as in: I'd've argued against it. While it was obvious what it meant, it left me puzzled. Is I'd've a proper word?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is “ailer” not a word?

I was playing Scrabble recently and the word ail was on the table. I tried to add an -er to the word to make the word "ailer." My reasoning was that since ail is a verb, one could add a suffix to the ...
-2
votes
1answer
185 views

What is the pronunciation of “ttiwdty”?

ttiwdty Not an initialism AFAIK (as far as I know) but an acronym like LASER and NATO. It's apparently trending on Urban Dictionary, although the down-votes outnumber the up-votes. It stands for The ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Has anyone here ever used the word “professionality”? (Or is it even a word?)

I've heard the owner of our school say the word twice. Urban Dictionary even has a definition for it: Professionality: The art of maintaining a professional appearance and attitude while projecting a ...
2
votes
6answers
7k views

Is “coachee” even a word?

If I am Rita's coach, is Rita my *coachee? (yikes) Is that even a word? Would it be correct instead to say she is my ward? What about terms for people at the other end of a mentor, sponsor ...
4
votes
3answers
772 views

Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “tnetennba” a real word?

I've seen and heard the word "tnetennba" used, most famously by Moss in an episode of the It Crowd in which he was a contestant on a fake episode of the TV show Countdown. In this episode, no ...
2
votes
2answers
411 views

Is “attentioned” a word?

I am often getting things sent to myself and other people. Is it wrong to say: Please send to... [address] attentioned to [name] I often say: Please sent to... [address] and attention it to ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Is “attemptee” actually a word?

I've seen the word online: American woman jumps into West Lake to save suicide attemptee... But then I tried the dictionary and didn't get any results. Is attemptee actually a word?
0
votes
1answer
86 views

Does the word “dashily” exist in English?

Could someone, please say if the word "dashily" exists? I couldn't find one in any vocabularies. A few hours ago I saw this web clip (The Vampire Diaries), and beginning from 00:40 Damon says: ...
6
votes
7answers
56k views

Are “w/o”, “w/”, “b/c” common abbreviations?

I remember when staying a few months in the US years ago that I saw some people using the abbreviations below. However, I can't exactly remember in which contexts I encountered them, (whether I saw my ...
17
votes
4answers
29k views

Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
3
votes
4answers
557 views

Is there a generic word for “all of x type of thing”?

I am looking for a generic collective noun that can be acceptably used to refer to all existing things of some particular kind. It would apply to "all existing trees", "all existing vehicles", "all ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “outstaffing” a real word?

In Russia a lot of companies provide "outstaffing" services , but I am not sure whether it's used outside post USSR countries. Is "outstaffing" a real word? Update: "Outstaffing" is when one company ...
0
votes
2answers
482 views

Is “orientate” a word? Does it matter where you are when using it? [duplicate]

Is orientate a word and if so how is it different than orient? I found this definition of it says "Generally considered an error in American English." does this mean it is not wrong for British ...
0
votes
1answer
546 views

Is 'efficate' a word in English? [closed]

I routinely hear the word "efficate" being used. For example, "The most powerful way to efficate a change in the system is to participate." I do not find entries for this word in common English ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

On the Existence of the Word 'Grousily'

Is 'grousily' a word? I would like to use it in a sentence to mean 'grumpily, as if in imitation of a rumpled grouse' but don't think it's okay because of how I couldn't find it in either OS X's ...
2
votes
1answer
197 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
1
vote
2answers
289 views

Is “fresher” really a “proper” English word?

I see a lot of folks on Stackoverflow using fresher when describing themselves as beginners at any given topic. I have never really heard of "fresher" as a synonym for beginner. I know "freshman" as ...
1
vote
3answers
401 views

What is the plural form of “whitespace”?

I ask this because Firefox suggested that whitespaces is not a valid word; rather it gave me whitespace or white spaces.
53
votes
10answers
33k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
4
votes
4answers
7k views

What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself hating people for using it both in English ...
16
votes
5answers
18k views

Is “curiouser” in fact a word (like in the famous phrase “curiouser and curiouser”)?

Is curiouser, in fact, a word?                                 (Yes, this question is very short, but that’s really all I need to ask.)
10
votes
2answers
36k views

Is “imbedded” a valid spelling of the word “embedded”?

I have seen this used on our marketing materials: The technology imbedded in this solution will help improve productivity. I was going to flag it as a spelling error, however Googling provided ...
1
vote
3answers
348 views

Is it “re-offend” or “reoffend”? [closed]

I want to know whether there is a hyphen in the word re-offend, or if it is spelt reoffend. I looked in Oxford English dictionary and the word "reoffend" appears, but then I checked Merriam-Webster ...
10
votes
6answers
28k views

“Smooths” versus “Smoothes”

I am interested in the rapid rise (since about 1993) in frequency of the spelling smoothes as against smooths. An Ngram Viewer graph tracking the frequency of usage of the two words from 1800 to ...
1
vote
1answer
446 views

Is 'acronymise/ze' a word? Is it used only colloquially, if at all?

I just sent a text to a friend, who didn't understand an acronym I used for a game: "Ah, I said it in a previous text so thought it was ok to abbreviate it." Though, since it was an acronym I ...
4
votes
2answers
116 views

Why isn't “innard” a word?

Innards is defined as "the internal organs of an animal". Then shouldn't "innard" denote a single internal organ? Or is this a case where a singular noun looks like a plural?
0
votes
3answers
934 views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?