Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

10
votes
3answers
709 views

Is 'compatriate' really an English word?

I recently saw the word 'compatriate' used in a newspaper article. Upon looking it up, suspecting a typo (or even an eggcorn: it is easy to see how compatriot would be mixed-up with expatriate etc.), ...
11
votes
9answers
29k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
4
votes
3answers
735 views

Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
2
votes
5answers
20k views

Is “That’ll” a real word?

Is the contraction from that will to that’ll an actual word or not?
10
votes
1answer
553 views

Is “Hissable” a well-received English word?

I posted a question about the receptivity of the word, “non-view” in “views and non-view” a few days ago. One answerer responded me that though “non-view” is not registered in any (or most) of ...
1
vote
1answer
175 views

Is “non-view” versus view a received English word?

I found the phrase, “views and non-views” in the following sentence of the New Yorker article (October 15) titled “Are Debates Good for Republican,” which was written by its senior editor, Amy ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “uncomplete” a word? [closed]

Or would I just use incomplete? Would there be any instance that one would uncomplete?
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Isn’t “Eye-glazing” a popular word? Why isn’t it included in major English dictionaries?

I came across the word eye-glazing in the article of today’s Time magazine (Sept 9) titled ‘Slow Down! Why Some Languages Sound So Fast?’, which I'm sure will interest 'language buffs'. It begins ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

“Demonstratable” — a dictionary word, or just a well known hack?

Someone has just pointed out a mis-spelling on my site - demonstratable, as in "demonstratable experience of...". I can't see it in the New Oxford American Dictionary or the Oxford Dictionary of ...
7
votes
3answers
320 views

Is ‘USAers’ just an ordinary English word today?

I saw the word, ‘USAers’ in the lead copy of Reuter’s news titled ‘Gippered’ in Time magazine (September 6), which says: “More than 1/3 of USAers say they are worse off under Bam. Warning-sign ...
0
votes
1answer
211 views

What is a better (actual) word for “cloner”? [closed]

According to some research, cloner is not an actual word, and to me it sounds horrible. (To be frank, it reminds me of the German word for toilet, Klo.) What I mean is something/someone that has the ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

If I can say “videos”, can I also say “audios”?

Audio and video seem to me very similar words by usage. I often hear the plural form for video, but is there a plural form for audio? Can I say audios? I've never heard it being used.
7
votes
4answers
50k views

What is the correct word to use instead of else’s?

If I am trying to say “That problem that belongs to someone else,” then what is the correct word to use in this sentence: That is someone else’s problem. My spell checker says else’s and elses ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “submittable” a valid word?

Is "submittable" a valid word to describe something that is eligible to submit?
48
votes
10answers
29k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
3
votes
1answer
457 views

What does ‘Cocktail-party fool’ exactly mean? Is it established English word?

I found the word ‘cocktail-party fool’ in the following sentence of the article in the Book review section of the New Yorker (August 16), which is titled ‘How Do You Say Ralph Fiennes?’ “The ...
5
votes
2answers
477 views

Is ‘Bash-a-thon’ a received English phrase or just a combination of words?

I saw the word ‘Bash-a-thon’ in the headline of the Time magazine article (August 3) - ‘Palin Joins in Romney Bash-a-thon’ followed by the lead coy: “In an interview with Hannity, Palin takes Romney ...
7
votes
5answers
9k views

Is the word “representativity” possible?

I found natural to use the word "representativity" (with regard to a sample population of a survey), but my dictionary does not agree with me. Is "representativity" a valid construction?
8
votes
1answer
253 views

Is ‘toasty-roasted’ well-received English?

I found the word, ‘toasty-roasted’ in the article of the Art section of Time Magazine reporting the reputation of the recently released movie ‘Cowboys & Aliens’ under the title, ‘Box Office: Why ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Is 'quiescing' a valid word? What does it mean?

What does quiescing mean in the following context? Quiescing a Database http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14231/start.htm
4
votes
3answers
798 views

Are all officially recognized Scrabble words English?

Looking at the official complete two-letter Scrabble word list, I cannot help but wonder whether they are even based on real English words. Are they? Note: I realize the answer to this question may ...
2
votes
3answers
727 views

Is “e'er” a true English word?

Are poetic contractions, such as "e'er", "o'er" and "ne'er" (and other less common ones), English? As in officially recognized?
23
votes
9answers
75k views

Is “receival” a valid word for the act of receiving something?

In the course of reviewing a standard operating procedure, I came across the subheading: "Receival, Costing and Charging of Work". I immediately began to doubt whether the word "receival" was a ...
5
votes
4answers
89k views

Is “conversate” a word?

Conversate: To converse, to participate in a conversation. My parents conversate with me over dinner every night. Is this a word? Spell check says no, but I have heard it used.
3
votes
1answer
207 views

Is “what in hejudas?” a common idiom or phrase?

I noticed the following phrase used in another question: Is this a common idiom? If so, what in hejudas inspired such a phrasing? Obviously, this is similar to the phrases “what in hell” or ...
3
votes
2answers
281 views

Is “unseductive” an established English word, or just coined?

In the article of Time magazine (May 17) dealing with the arrest of IMF Chief, Dominique Strauss-Kahn on alleged charges of assaulting a hotel housekeeper, under the title of “The Seduction myth: What ...
1
vote
3answers
381 views

What is the plural form of “whitespace”?

I ask this because Firefox suggested that whitespaces is not a valid word; rather it gave me whitespace or white spaces.
7
votes
5answers
6k views

What does ‘shpritz’ mean?

I came across the word shpritz in the following sentence of a New York Times article (May 12th) titled, "At 100, Still a Teacher, Quite a Character": At 100 years old, Ms. Kaufman is still ...
2
votes
3answers
560 views

Is “recyclist” a word?

If you are a person who avidly recycles, are you a recyclist?
3
votes
1answer
374 views

Do any print dictionaries admit “everytime” as a word?

I've noticed a tendency for more and more two-word phrases with even slightly idiomatic usage being written more and more as single word compounds. Today when I came across "everytime" written as a ...
2
votes
2answers
369 views

Is ‘misunderestimate’ a received (American) English word?

I found the word ‘misunderestimating’ in the article written by Peter Catapano under the caption 'Don't stop believing' in Opinionator’s Column section of New York Times (April 29). The word is not ...
4
votes
8answers
230 views

Is “unredactable” a word?

I googled it and even though it's been used on the Web, I can't find any entries for it on online dictionaries. If it's not a real word, then is there a good equivalent? The context is a record ...
6
votes
7answers
4k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is “injur” a word? [closed]

Am I going crazy? I think "injur" must be a transitive verb meaning "to cause injury to," as in "the flying debris might injur the bystanders." Yet when I google around and check online ...
-1
votes
2answers
3k views

Is “nerdiosity” a real word?

I originally saw this question here, and it made me wonder.
1
vote
1answer
3k views

What does 'graft probe’ mean? Is it well-received word?

I found the word ‘graft probe’ in the headline of a Associate Press news in today’s Washington Post (April 11) reporting that former president of Egypt, Hosni Mubarak is presently in detention in Sham ...
17
votes
4answers
27k views

Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

UK English: Is “dived” a valid word?

Proofing a manuscript, I found this in the middle of a chase scene: Spotting an opening, I dived into it and was horrified to find it was a dead end. Is “dived” a valid past tense of the verb ...
19
votes
5answers
1k views

Is “princessship” a real word? Are there any other words which have the same letter 3 times consecutively?

One of my friends argues that princessship is the only word which has 3 identical letter comes together (s) ,but I think there is no word such as princessship. Can anyone tell me whether this is a ...
22
votes
7answers
135k views

Is “actioned” a valid word?

I've just, without much fore thought, used the word "actioned" in the following (example) context, and am now wondering if it's valid (upon a re-read I've decided I don't like the way it sounds, hence ...
2
votes
6answers
7k views

Is “coachee” even a word?

If I am Rita's coach, is Rita my *coachee? (yikes) Is that even a word? Would it be correct instead to say she is my ward? What about terms for people at the other end of a mentor, sponsor ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

When does a word become a 'word'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word The rule of thumb used to be that when a word hit the Oxford Dictionary, it was considered to be an accepted word - this, however, seems to have ...
8
votes
5answers
10k views

Is “administrate” a valid English verb? What's the difference between it and “administer”?

We had an interesting discussion yesterday about the use of administer and administrate. I feel that there is a case for both usages -- sometimes you might administer something, and other times you ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “delegable” a word?

Wiktionary defines delegetable as capable of being delegated, which seems correct to the French speaking that I am. However, the same Wiktionary also defines delegable as that can be delegated. Does ...
0
votes
3answers
873 views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
16
votes
5answers
16k views

Is “curiouser” in fact a word (like in the famous phrase “curiouser and curiouser”)?

Is curiouser, in fact, a word?                                 (Yes, this question is very short, but that’s really all I need to ask.)
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is ‘Yes-ish’ a perfect alternative to Yes, or is it 'Yes ‘on condition’? Is it received English?

I found a word ‘Yes-ish’ in the answer (from PLL) to my question about the meaning of ‘Stuck to the script’ I posted today. As it is quite new to my ear, I consulted with Wikipedia before logging out ...
14
votes
2answers
17k views

Is “authentification” a real word?

My professor used the word authentification in a lecture. I have always used authentication. Is it a real word or is authentication the correct term?
14
votes
3answers
25k views

Is “misconfigured” a word?

I use the word "misconfigured" all the time, but MS Word, Chrome, and the two dictionaries I checked don't list it as a word. I'm going to keep using it instead of "configured incorrectly" because I ...
2
votes
3answers
233 views

Is Administratium an actual word?

We commonly use this word in office, and the definitions point to its meaning. But is this an actual word? It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary.