Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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votes
2answers
1k views

Is “unmissable” a valid word?

I noticed an advert on TV advertising "unmissable" shows coming up. MS Word marks it as a spelling mistake, but the Mac OS is OK with it. I don't particularly like it.
5
votes
4answers
619 views

Is “ass-wise” an acceptable English word? Is it a noun, or adverb?

I was surprised to see the New Yorker’s (February 26) article titled, “Boehner defends decision to remain on ass,” which was chockablock with the word, “Ass.” “Minutes after telling the United ...
-1
votes
1answer
176 views

Is 'promptus' a valid word? [closed]

I did a Google:define on Promptus and think it has Latin origin. But since I don't see it in the English dictionaries, I am not sure if I can use it at all in my conversation.
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “outstaffing” a real word?

In Russia a lot of companies provide "outstaffing" services , but I am not sure whether it's used outside post USSR countries. Is "outstaffing" a real word? Update: "Outstaffing" is when one company ...
10
votes
6answers
32k views

“Smooths” versus “Smoothes”

I am interested in the rapid rise (since about 1993) in frequency of the spelling smoothes as against smooths. An Ngram Viewer graph tracking the frequency of usage of the two words from 1800 to ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why isn’t “hermeticity” easily found in the dictionaries?

The word hermeticity as (for the lack of better definition, hence the question) “the quality of being hermetic” (not to be confused with mathematical hermiticity, which is also absent from the general ...
3
votes
1answer
823 views

Is “subcopy” a word?

A copywriter just sent me over a copy deck that had the word subcopy to describe the text immediately after the page title. Up until now I had been referring to it as a description. Example: ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
5
votes
2answers
64k views

Can “casted” be the past tense of “cast”?

'The Hindu,' an Indian daily, reports: Leader of Opposition in Rajya Sabha Arun Jaitely casted his vote at Chimanbhai Patel Institute opposite Karnavati club. Does the verb cast has a form as ...
1
vote
1answer
471 views

What are the component words of 'Cliffpocalypsemageddonacaust'? Can this be accepted as a practical English word?

I was amused to find the unusually lengthy word, “Cliffpocalypsemageddonacaust” in Maureen Dowd’s article titled “Watch Out Below!” in December 15 NY-Times. Dowd admits she used a word invented by Jon ...
5
votes
2answers
661 views

Is “re-enqueue” or “reenqueue” a proper word?

This came up while reviewing a technical document: The algorithm could re-enqueue the id associated with the job ... This has generated some discussion as the word does not appear in the ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Is “habitated” a word?

I couldn't find it in multiple dictionaries, but have seen it used by several people. However, I do not know if this is just due to the word "sounding right", or from the word actually existing. Does ...
0
votes
2answers
125 views

“Censorship” as a countable noun [closed]

Is censorships a legitimate word? Obviously it could be used to mean multiple censorships for something.
4
votes
3answers
364 views

Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?

I find Maureen Dowd’s article in November 24 NY-Times titled “But can they eat 50 eggs?”amusing. She compares the leadership and charm of character between President Obama and Robert Griffin III, the ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there the word, “Fortunity”? If there is, what does it mean?

I "think" I clearly heard the word, “Fortunity” in the following statement of the Wall Street Journal Report of this week (November 5th), introducing the unique service of Sanchez Delta Airline via ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

is “purposely” an actual word? [closed]

I grew up in Malaysia and Singapore, and it's taken me a long time to dissect my vocabulary into "local slang, incomprehensible/incorrect elsewhere" and "proper English". 'Purposely' is one of those ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Why is “desperacy” not an English word?

I know one says an act of desperation, but I've heard desperacy much more than I've ever heard desperation, it's like I've almost never heard desperation. Why exactly was desperation preferred over ...
1
vote
2answers
825 views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
4
votes
2answers
330 views

Is “Songify” a well-received word as an English neology?

I came across the word “songify” for the first time in the article of October 23 NY Times titled ‘Yes We Chant’ with the sub-head, “The Gregory Brothers songify the debate, with Gregorian chanting.” ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is esquivalience now a bona fide word?

Today, I came across WP's entry for the word esquivalience: "Esquivalience" is a fictitious entry in the New Oxford American Dictionary (NOAD), which was designed and included to protect copyright ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

What's proper English for 'experimentee'? [closed]

What is the English word / phrase for things / persons that are experimented on? I think of experimentee but I believe there may be more common words.
0
votes
3answers
346 views

A real-word synonym for the non-word “trustedness” [closed]

I always thought that trustedness was a word, but apparently it isn't. What's a real word that means the same thing, namely the quality of being trusted? Note that this is a different meaning from ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “adorkable” mean? How popular is this word? To what kind of objects and occasions can I apply “adorkable”?

I happened to find the paperback book titled Adorkable, by Sarra Manning, on the GoodReads site. There is no entry for adorkable in the Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster dictionaries, or in ...
11
votes
4answers
1k views

What does “randomically” mean?

I've just read an O’Reilly book and encoutered the word randomically. I highly suspect this is a made up word, but a quick google found it in use here, here, and here. Is this some obscure technical ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “tri-quarterly” a real English word meaning 3 times a year?

Is "tri-quarterly" a real English word meaning 3 times a year? Are there any other words that mean 3 times a year?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “scopperloit” a real word?

Bysshe, Bysshe, Bysshe! What are we going to do about you? I hope you'll pardon this mesonoxian and inaniloquent lamprophony from a nihilarian pronk; it is not so much a phenakist scopperloit ...
14
votes
2answers
7k views

How popular is ‘Contrafibularities’ as a day-to-day English word?

I found the phrase “My sincerest contrafibularities, Tim” given to one of the comments to my question about the word, 'Cromulent' in EL&U site. As I was totally unfamiliar with the word, ...
9
votes
3answers
10k views

Is “laser-focused” a new word?

I found the word “laser-focused on the bottom line” in the following sentence of the New York Times (August 6) op ed titled, “Dream, Baby, Dream!” “We also know – look at Syria – dictators who ...
6
votes
7answers
552 views

Is the word “throwee” acceptable?

I wanted to have a word to refer to the thing being thrown, so I decided to use the word "throwee". I can't find this word in online dictionaries, so I guess this word does not exist in the English ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
6
votes
1answer
204 views

Is “postchoice” a well-used word?

I came upon the word postchoice in the following sentence of Time magazine’s (May 28) article titled “The optimism bias,” dealing with the benefits of positive thinking: According to social ...
4
votes
1answer
384 views

Does “bloodripe” actually exist as a word?

I’ve come on the adjective bloodripe in Nabokov’s Lolita (bold emphasis added): . . . it had become quite a habit with me of not being too attentive to women lest they come toppling, bloodripe, ...
3
votes
1answer
306 views

Has the word “Birtherism” gotten the currency or ‘citizenship’ as the received English?

I found the article titled “Birtherism isn’t dead” in today’s Washington Post. It begins with the following sentence: “Discussion of President Obama’s place of birth died down significantly when he ...
11
votes
2answers
40k views

Is “imbedded” a valid spelling of the word “embedded”?

I have seen this used on our marketing materials: The technology imbedded in this solution will help improve productivity. I was going to flag it as a spelling error, however Googling provided ...
8
votes
6answers
26k views

Is “solutioning” a correct word?

My Outlook flags the word "solutioning" as a spelling mistake. According to Urban Dictionary : solutioning: A word many business people misuse to describe the process of creating a solution. ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “jux” a real word?

Urbandictionary.com says it means: To rob. Verb. Present tense of juxt. It has 342 votes but I can't find any evidence of actual usage on a google or COCA search.
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Opposite of subpar… superpar?

If something can be "on par", and "subpar", can something be described as "superpar"? Is there an accepted way to describe something as extraordinary with this term?
6
votes
4answers
770 views

Is “Thisness” an established English word? What is the alternative expression that sounds more natural and familiar?

I came across an unfamiliar word to me, thisness in the following sentence of New Yorker magazine’s (April 19) article titled, What We’re Reading: Buzzfeed, “Pulphead,” Chekhov, and More” James ...
3
votes
3answers
543 views

Is “prepper” a word that an average English speaking person understands?

Is prepper a word that an average English speaking person understands (and also uses)?
2
votes
3answers
1k views

What does “goo up” mean? Is it a well-received idiom?

I found the word, “goo up” in the following statement of New York Times’ (April 2nd) article titled “Desperately seeking synonyms,” which was written by Constance Hale as a series of writing lessons. ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “payless” synonym of “free”?

Does "payless" mean "for zero price", and "free" (as in beer)? I searched the dictionaries but could not find the word. I also wonder whether "cost-free" means the same.
22
votes
5answers
2k views

Is “iff” considered a real word or just an abbreviation?

I wonder if "iff" is considered a real word (as LEO says) or is it just an abbreviation (as in Wiktionary)?
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Can 'floccinaucinihilipilification' be considered a real word? [closed]

Can 'floccinaucinihilipilification' still be considered a real word? The only context that I have ever seen it used is as an example of one of the longest words in the English language. Also how ...
8
votes
1answer
214 views

Is “outpander” a received English word? Can “out” be used to any verb as one likes?

I saw the word, outpander in the following sentence of Maureen Dowd’s article titled, “Liz: Cheney desist!” in March 6 New York Times: Speaking by satellite to the American Israel Public Affairs ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

Is there a verb “refactor” meaning “doing refactoring” in English?

Code refactoring consists of changing the structure of the code without changing its functionality. The term refactoring is currently used by software development industry to refer to this process. ...
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votes
1answer
151 views

Meaning of sentence with “vercingetorism” [closed]

This remark was made on an online forum. Preliminary online search was of not much help. (D)id you intend to deal with all this vercingetorism? This is certainly not a word from one of ...
4
votes
8answers
3k views

Real word for “equippable”

Equippable, while not a really a word, seems to be accepted by the gaming community as a term for this can be equipped. Is there a more appropriate word which is real, singular and essentially means ...
1
vote
5answers
5k views

Correctness and spelling of “misscheduled”

I'm sure I've heard the word misscheduled used multiple times in my life. But just now, my spell checker threw a fit. Since I wasn't sure if it should be misscheduled, mis-scheduled, or mischeduled ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “noncompatible” a legitimate synonym of “incompatible”?

I'm working with someone who uses noncompatible often in correspondence. The confusion may be due to English being a second language for them. I think they should be using incompatible instead. Is ...
1
vote
2answers
957 views

Is the word “encomprise” used in modern English? [closed]

If one googles the word encomprises, there are 5K+ pages, that have this word. I personally have heard people in the USA use it with a meaning of include. Official dictionaries, on the other hand, ...