Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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3
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “tri-quarterly” a real English word meaning 3 times a year?

Is "tri-quarterly" a real English word meaning 3 times a year? Are there any other words that mean 3 times a year?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “scopperloit” a real word?

Bysshe, Bysshe, Bysshe! What are we going to do about you? I hope you'll pardon this mesonoxian and inaniloquent lamprophony from a nihilarian pronk; it is not so much a phenakist scopperloit ...
14
votes
2answers
5k views

How popular is ‘Contrafibularities’ as a day-to-day English word?

I found the phrase “My sincerest contrafibularities, Tim” given to one of the comments to my question about the word, 'Cromulent' in EL&U site. As I was totally unfamiliar with the word, ...
9
votes
3answers
8k views

Is “laser-focused” a new word?

I found the word “laser-focused on the bottom line” in the following sentence of the New York Times (August 6) op ed titled, “Dream, Baby, Dream!” “We also know – look at Syria – dictators who ...
6
votes
7answers
515 views

Is the word “throwee” acceptable?

I wanted to have a word to refer to the thing being thrown, so I decided to use the word "throwee". I can't find this word in online dictionaries, so I guess this word does not exist in the English ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
6
votes
1answer
177 views

Is “postchoice” a well-used word?

I came upon the word postchoice in the following sentence of Time magazine’s (May 28) article titled “The optimism bias,” dealing with the benefits of positive thinking: According to social ...
4
votes
1answer
306 views

Does “bloodripe” actually exist as a word?

I’ve come on the adjective bloodripe in Nabokov’s Lolita (bold emphasis added): . . . it had become quite a habit with me of not being too attentive to women lest they come toppling, bloodripe, ...
3
votes
1answer
291 views

Has the word “Birtherism” gotten the currency or ‘citizenship’ as the received English?

I found the article titled “Birtherism isn’t dead” in today’s Washington Post. It begins with the following sentence: “Discussion of President Obama’s place of birth died down significantly when he ...
8
votes
2answers
26k views

Is “imbedded” a valid spelling of the word “embedded”?

I have seen this used on our marketing materials: The technology imbedded in this solution will help improve productivity. I was going to flag it as a spelling error, however Googling provided ...
6
votes
6answers
18k views

Is “solutioning” a correct word?

My Outlook flags the word "solutioning" as a spelling mistake. According to Urban Dictionary : solutioning: A word many business people misuse to describe the process of creating a solution. ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “jux” a real word?

Urbandictionary.com says it means: To rob. Verb. Present tense of juxt. It has 342 votes but I can't find any evidence of actual usage on a google or COCA search.
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Opposite of subpar… superpar?

If something can be "on par", and "subpar", can something be described as "superpar"? Is there an accepted way to describe something as extraordinary with this term?
6
votes
4answers
657 views

Is “Thisness” an established English word? What is the alternative expression that sounds more natural and familiar?

I came across an unfamiliar word to me, thisness in the following sentence of New Yorker magazine’s (April 19) article titled, What We’re Reading: Buzzfeed, “Pulphead,” Chekhov, and More” James ...
3
votes
3answers
468 views

Is “prepper” a word that an average English speaking person understands?

Is prepper a word that an average English speaking person understands (and also uses)?
2
votes
3answers
851 views

What does “goo up” mean? Is it a well-received idiom?

I found the word, “goo up” in the following statement of New York Times’ (April 2nd) article titled “Desperately seeking synonyms,” which was written by Constance Hale as a series of writing lessons. ...
2
votes
1answer
992 views

Is “payless” synonym of “free”?

Does "payless" mean "for zero price", and "free" (as in beer)? I searched the dictionaries but could not find the word. I also wonder whether "cost-free" means the same.
19
votes
5answers
2k views

Is “iff” considered a real word or just an abbreviation?

I wonder if "iff" is considered a real word (as LEO says) or is it just an abbreviation (as in Wiktionary)?
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Can 'floccinaucinihilipilification' be considered a real word? [closed]

Can 'floccinaucinihilipilification' still be considered a real word? The only context that I have ever seen it used is as an example of one of the longest words in the English language. Also how ...
8
votes
1answer
183 views

Is “outpander” a received English word? Can “out” be used to any verb as one likes?

I saw the word, outpander in the following sentence of Maureen Dowd’s article titled, “Liz: Cheney desist!” in March 6 New York Times: Speaking by satellite to the American Israel Public Affairs ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a verb “refactor” meaning “doing refactoring” in English?

Code refactoring consists of changing the structure of the code without changing its functionality. The term refactoring is currently used by software development industry to refer to this process. ...
-3
votes
1answer
145 views

Meaning of sentence with “vercingetorism” [closed]

This remark was made on an online forum. Preliminary online search was of not much help. (D)id you intend to deal with all this vercingetorism? This is certainly not a word from one of ...
3
votes
7answers
3k views

Real word for “equippable”

Equippable, while not a really a word, seems to be accepted by the gaming community as a term for this can be equipped. Is there a more appropriate word which is real, singular and essentially means ...
1
vote
5answers
4k views

Correctness and spelling of “misscheduled”

I'm sure I've heard the word misscheduled used multiple times in my life. But just now, my spell checker threw a fit. Since I wasn't sure if it should be misscheduled, mis-scheduled, or mischeduled ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “noncompatible” a legitimate synonym of “incompatible”?

I'm working with someone who uses noncompatible often in correspondence. The confusion may be due to English being a second language for them. I think they should be using incompatible instead. Is ...
1
vote
2answers
798 views

Is the word “encomprise” used in modern English? [closed]

If one googles the word encomprises, there are 5K+ pages, that have this word. I personally have heard people in the USA use it with a meaning of include. Official dictionaries, on the other hand, ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “uncollaborative” a word?

I am describing a process as being antithetical to collaboration. To clarify, I'm referring to its quality as being "not naturally collaborative", not "actively anti-collaboration" Is ...
3
votes
4answers
202 views

Is “post-apocalyptically” a valid word?

I found apocalyptically, but not with post-. I'm trying to say in a way that is post-apocalyptic. Example: Post-apocalyptically-scented outdoors.
1
vote
2answers
706 views

Is “shvisle” a real or made up word? [closed]

I've come across the word in this captchart: "Yo, my nizzle, can you pass me that shvisle?". Is it supposed to mean something? I've easly found the meaning of nizzle, but I'm at a loss with shvisle. ...
9
votes
3answers
7k views

Is “embiggen” considered a formal or slang word?

If my memory serves me correctly, I first encountered the word embiggen a year or so ago. I thought it seemed odd, but in context, the meaning was quite obvious. Since that time I've seen this word ...
2
votes
1answer
17k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English ...
5
votes
10answers
1k views

Equivalent word for 'Unfriend' on Social media sites?

I understand that 'Unfriend' is not a valid English word. But, is there an equivalent word for the act of 'Unfriending' someone, like on Facebook? 'Not being on talking terms' is something a friend ...
3
votes
3answers
152 views

Is “constringence” a word?

I would like to express, in one word, the tendency to concentrate excessively rather than disperse. This is applied in a sentence where I describe a set of data, which has too much focus on one aspect ...
19
votes
4answers
5k views

How popular is the word “cromulent”? If I use this word in conversation with native speakers, doesn’t it look out of place?

In today’s post, “What’s the antonym for recommend?” an answerer answered "I discourage the blue sweater" sounds perfectly cromulent.” As I am utterly unfamiliar with the word, “cromulent,” I looked ...
10
votes
4answers
2k views

Why can’t one be “trepid”?

Why can someone be intrepid but not trepid ? The Free Dictionary and Merriam-Webster both consider trepid to be a real word, but my computer’s little spell-checker program does not recognize it as ...
10
votes
3answers
669 views

Is 'compatriate' really an English word?

I recently saw the word 'compatriate' used in a newspaper article. Upon looking it up, suspecting a typo (or even an eggcorn: it is easy to see how compatriot would be mixed-up with expatriate etc.), ...
11
votes
9answers
25k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
0
votes
5answers
17k views

Is “That’ll” a real word?

Is the contraction from that will to that’ll an actual word or not?
10
votes
1answer
526 views

Is “Hissable” a well-received English word?

I posted a question about the receptivity of the word, “non-view” in “views and non-view” a few days ago. One answerer responded me that though “non-view” is not registered in any (or most) of ...
1
vote
1answer
164 views

Is “non-view” versus view a received English word?

I found the phrase, “views and non-views” in the following sentence of the New Yorker article (October 15) titled “Are Debates Good for Republican,” which was written by its senior editor, Amy ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “uncomplete” a word? [closed]

Or would I just use incomplete? Would there be any instance that one would uncomplete?
7
votes
4answers
1k views

Isn’t “Eye-glazing” a popular word? Why isn’t it included in major English dictionaries?

I came across the word eye-glazing in the article of today’s Time magazine (Sept 9) titled ‘Slow Down! Why Some Languages Sound So Fast?’, which I'm sure will interest 'language buffs'. It begins ...
3
votes
4answers
5k views

“Demonstratable” — a dictionary word, or just a well known hack?

Someone has just pointed out a mis-spelling on my site - demonstratable, as in "demonstratable experience of...". I can't see it in the New Oxford American Dictionary or the Oxford Dictionary of ...
7
votes
3answers
311 views

Is ‘USAers’ just an ordinary English word today?

I saw the word, ‘USAers’ in the lead copy of Reuter’s news titled ‘Gippered’ in Time magazine (September 6), which says: “More than 1/3 of USAers say they are worse off under Bam. Warning-sign ...
0
votes
1answer
201 views

What is a better (actual) word for “cloner”? [closed]

According to some research, cloner is not an actual word, and to me it sounds horrible. (To be frank, it reminds me of the German word for toilet, Klo.) What I mean is something/someone that has the ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

If I can say “videos”, can I also say “audios”?

Audio and video seem to me very similar words by usage. I often hear the plural form for video, but is there a plural form for audio? Can I say audios? I've never heard it being used.
6
votes
4answers
35k views

What is the correct word to use instead of else’s?

If I am trying to say “That problem that belongs to someone else,” then what is the correct word to use in this sentence: That is someone else’s problem. My spell checker says else’s and elses ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “submittable” a valid word?

Is "submittable" a valid word to describe something that is eligible to submit?
43
votes
9answers
24k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
3
votes
1answer
437 views

What does ‘Cocktail-party fool’ exactly mean? Is it established English word?

I found the word ‘cocktail-party fool’ in the following sentence of the article in the Book review section of the New Yorker (August 16), which is titled ‘How Do You Say Ralph Fiennes?’ “The ...