Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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votes
2answers
154 views

Is subaccount one word?

I looked at the Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries online and they don't contain this word. But typing it into google takes me to the Merriam Webster definition. So does this just come down to taste? ...
1
vote
1answer
362 views

Is 'acronymise/ze' a word? Is it used only colloquially, if at all?

I just sent a text to a friend, who didn't understand an acronym I used for a game: "Ah, I said it in a previous text so thought it was ok to abbreviate it." Though, since it was an acronym I ...
3
votes
2answers
579 views

Is “kekeke” considered an English word?

"kekeke" is somewhat of an alternative to "hehehe" or "huehuehue". From Urban Dictionary: This is an onomatopoeia for laughter. Its origin is the Korean onomatopoeia ㅋㅋㅋ, in which ㅋ stands for the ...
0
votes
1answer
338 views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
1
vote
2answers
781 views

Is “yearslong” a word?

New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
-1
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2answers
4k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
7
votes
5answers
27k views

Is funner a word? [duplicate]

I am constantly told "funner" is not a word. Even Google auto corrects. Yet "funner" is used very often in spoken English with people I meet. Is funner a word? If not why? What causes it to not be ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there a word “issual”?

I have used and come across the phrase "issual of tickets" but when recently writing something my Word dictionary tells me that "issual" is not an actual word. Is that the case?
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votes
1answer
2k views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
3
votes
1answer
197 views

Using pond as a verb to describe the formation of puddles

"The tenant complained that water is ponding in the parking area." or, "Due to the ponding of water in the lower lying areas, mosquitoes became a nuisance." "ponding" is not accepted by spellcheckers ...
0
votes
1answer
200 views

Is “ignorably” a word?

I would like to use ignorably as the adverb of ignorable but I am not sure whether this is correct. I did not find ignorably in any online dictionary. To give the context: Normally, you cannot ignore ...
0
votes
1answer
308 views

Can “conversant” be a noun?

Googling amongst the world's online dictionaries produces conflicting results, but on the whole indicates that the answer is "no". However, it feels so natural to say: The conversants conversed. ...
1
vote
1answer
144 views

Can I use “linkography” instead of “bibliography” when referring to web links?

I’m writing a piece of documentation and I want to add the links I'm referring to at the bottom of my document. Since they are links and not books, I think the section title should not use the word ...
4
votes
2answers
150 views

“Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?

Is the word prolers an English word or just rubbish/noise added to the Scrabble dictionary? If it's a real English word, what does it mean? (Not a general reference question by virtue of this word ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Could 'otwards' or even 'hotwards' ever be accepted into the language?

I've just woken early from a vivid dream. (must be the local ale - we are in Yorkshire at the moment). I was in an inferno of an industrial kitchen where they were manufacturing 'ready-meals'. One ...
1
vote
4answers
402 views

Is “inbuilt” a word? Is it alright to use it or should I use “built in”?

I searched and found this: “Built-in” or “In-built”, which says inbuilt is fine. But in a reddit comment, I was told that I should use built in instead of inbuilt. Which is correct? I am using the ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “disclude” a word and what authority says a word is a word or isn't?

So far this is what I found from Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster except the latter doesn't have disclude. Exclude — To keep something out. From Latin excludere, from ex-, “out”, + variant form of the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is “hayway” an English word?

I thought I had heard and seen this word being used. For example, If you do this, things will go hayway. Meaning that things will go out of order in a mess/berserk, something like that. Now I ...
0
votes
4answers
171 views

Is 'handshaking' a legitimate word? [closed]

In microprocessors, handshake signals are issued by a microprocessor in acknowledgement of a request by another device. This process has been repeatedly referred to as 'handshaking' in my lectures. ...
3
votes
1answer
143 views

Is 'somelike' a word?

Never mind the laconic title. It's incontrovertibly a word. What I'd like to know is whether the little bugger has ever been recorded by lexicographers. I've ruffled a dozen dictionaries to no avail, ...
0
votes
2answers
862 views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word?

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
3
votes
2answers
170 views

Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word?

Usage: "I would not like to eat that pie as it looks all festy since you dropped it on the ground." Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word? Also, is it used elsewhere in the world? ...
1
vote
2answers
973 views

Is “revelationary” a word in the English language? [closed]

Is "revelationary" a word in the English language?. If it isn't a word in proper English, then which word, if any, can be used for something that leads to a revelation?
1
vote
2answers
828 views

Is “restructuralization” a word?

I found this word restructuralization on a project report and was wondering whether this word exists in the English language.
0
votes
2answers
125 views

Is “demonstratee” a legitimate word?

Is demonstratee a legitimate word? None of the usual sources think so, but it seems like -ee should be a productive suffix. If it isn't, is there another word that can be used in reference to the ...
5
votes
7answers
43k views

Are “w/o”, “w/”, “b/c” common abbreviations?

I remember when staying a few months in the US years ago that I saw some people using the abbreviations below. However, I can't exactly remember in which contexts I encountered them, (whether I saw my ...
5
votes
1answer
385 views

Is “teh” an English word?

I remember being told that "teh" (a common misspelling of "the") is actually a proper (though very old and no longer in common usage) English word. Teh was used as an example that if every single ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “Plannable” an English (UK) word?

Is plannable, (e.g.: this task can be planned, it is plannable) an actual word in UK English? It's one I see used quite often (mostly in business scenarios, both spoken and in emails) but haven't ...
1
vote
2answers
107 views

Is “mainstream” an acceptable verb?

I recently read the word "mainstream" as a verb and doubted whether it was the best choice in the sentence. Can you say you want to "mainstream" something? Perhaps it is grammatical but just ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Speeded vs. Sped [closed]

I think "speeded" may have been the appropriate past-tense form for "to speed" in the past, but I wonder if it is still considered the correct form. In spoken English, one usually hears "sped" to ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Does the word “simpleness” actually exist? [closed]

I always thought the word "simpleness" didn't exist and this was even confirmed by some American friends of mine. However, I tried to look it up on some online dictionaries and I was surprised to find ...
4
votes
2answers
8k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

Does the word “raytracer” exist?

If not, is it well readable anyway? "Ray tracer" seems to be used more frequently but this is not my question. An example sentence could be: A raytracer is a computer program that uses an ...
9
votes
3answers
12k views

Does the word “skyfall” (or “sky falls”) exist in English?

I found the word, “skyfall” being used in the article of April 18 Nikkei.com. under the title, “What the collapse of the gold bubble tells” with the following lead copy “International commodity ...
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votes
1answer
2k views

Is 'metacogniscent' a word?

I was watching this video and around the 1:05 minute mark the girl said 'metacogniscent', but I'm wondering whether or not that actually is a word, and if so; did she use it correctly (from what I've ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference between misfunction and malfunction

Difference between misfunction and malfunction? Is misfunction a proper English word? If it is, what's the difference between the two above?
-1
votes
2answers
433 views

Is “workflow” a word? [closed]

I'm trying to reference a business process in which a document has to be approved by several different people before it is finalized. I want to be able to say things like: We've modified the ...
-1
votes
3answers
132 views

Is “impurposely” a word?

I want to express the meaning of doing something without an definite purpose: is there a word impurposely? If not, which word should I use?
1
vote
3answers
202 views

Why does no dictionary carry the word 'non-affair', though all carry 'nonevent'?

I came across the word “non-affair” in Jeffery Archer’s novel Kane and Abel, which I just finished reading yesterday. The word appears in the following sentence (p. 544): “She couldn’t recall ...
4
votes
4answers
7k views

What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself hating people for using it both in English ...
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votes
2answers
1k views

Is “unmissable” a valid word?

I noticed an advert on TV advertising "unmissable" shows coming up. MS Word marks it as a spelling mistake, but the Mac OS is OK with it. I don't particularly like it.
5
votes
4answers
540 views

Is “ass-wise” an acceptable English word? Is it a noun, or adverb?

I was surprised to see the New Yorker’s (February 26) article titled, “Boehner defends decision to remain on ass,” which was chockablock with the word, “Ass.” “Minutes after telling the United ...
-1
votes
1answer
152 views

Is 'promptus' a valid word? [closed]

I did a Google:define on Promptus and think it has Latin origin. But since I don't see it in the English dictionaries, I am not sure if I can use it at all in my conversation.
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “outstaffing” a real word?

In Russia a lot of companies provide "outstaffing" services , but I am not sure whether it's used outside post USSR countries. Is "outstaffing" a real word? Update: "Outstaffing" is when one company ...
10
votes
6answers
24k views

“Smooths” versus “Smoothes”

I am interested in the rapid rise (since about 1993) in frequency of the spelling smoothes as against smooths. An Ngram Viewer graph tracking the frequency of usage of the two words from 1800 to ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why isn’t “hermeticity” easily found in the dictionaries?

The word hermeticity as (for the lack of better definition, hence the question) “the quality of being hermetic” (not to be confused with mathematical hermiticity, which is also absent from the general ...
3
votes
1answer
676 views

Is “subcopy” a word?

A copywriter just sent me over a copy deck that had the word subcopy to describe the text immediately after the page title. Up until now I had been referring to it as a description. Example: ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
3
votes
3answers
53k views

Can “casted” be the past tense of “cast”?

'The Hindu,' an Indian daily, reports: Leader of Opposition in Rajya Sabha Arun Jaitely casted his vote at Chimanbhai Patel Institute opposite Karnavati club. Does the verb cast has a form as ...
1
vote
1answer
449 views

What are the component words of 'Cliffpocalypsemageddonacaust'? Can this be accepted as a practical English word?

I was amused to find the unusually lengthy word, “Cliffpocalypsemageddonacaust” in Maureen Dowd’s article titled “Watch Out Below!” in December 15 NY-Times. Dowd admits she used a word invented by Jon ...