0
votes
2answers
97 views

Are you familiar with the term “air-conditioningitis”? [closed]

According to this article, "[a]ir-conditioningitis occurs when the body cannot adjust properly to the sharp differences in temperature between the cool air-conditioned indoors and the warm outdoors." ...
2
votes
3answers
64 views

Is “recordee” a word? [closed]

Does recordee exist in English? The word doesn't exist in Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries, but I was hoping to use it as "someone who is being recorded".
3
votes
1answer
126 views

Is “banana” the shortest overlap word?

Banana, alfalfa, entente: these are words containing an overlap, that is, the pattern XYXYX where X and Y are replaced by letters or sequences of letters. The idea is that the two occurrences of XYX ...
0
votes
4answers
261 views

“corollarily” or equivalent?

A corollary in mathematics is a useful side-effect (with other related meanings, but as it pertains to this question, that's the relevant definition to keep in mind). I want to use the word ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

Isn’t “Eye-glazing” a popular word? Why isn’t it included in major English dictionaries?

I came across the word eye-glazing in the article of today’s Time magazine (Sept 9) titled ‘Slow Down! Why Some Languages Sound So Fast?’, which I'm sure will interest 'language buffs'. It begins ...
3
votes
2answers
262 views

Is “unseductive” an established English word, or just coined?

In the article of Time magazine (May 17) dealing with the arrest of IMF Chief, Dominique Strauss-Kahn on alleged charges of assaulting a hotel housekeeper, under the title of “The Seduction myth: What ...
6
votes
7answers
4k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
2
votes
3answers
225 views

Is Administratium an actual word?

We commonly use this word in office, and the definitions point to its meaning. But is this an actual word? It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary.