1
vote
1answer
39 views

On the Existence of the Word 'Grousily'

Is 'grousily' a word? I would like to use it in a sentence to mean 'grumpy, as if in imitation of a rumpled grouse' but don't think it's okay because of how I couldn't find it in either OS X's ...
-2
votes
3answers
153 views

What is the meaning of unhighlight [closed]

What does the word "unhighlight" mean? Alternately, is it even a word? What would be its usage? I can't find it in my dictionary or on the internet. I am using it in the context of if you highlight ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
-1
votes
1answer
131 views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
0
votes
1answer
278 views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
7
votes
5answers
21k views

Is funner a word? [duplicate]

I am constantly told "funner" is not a word. Even Google auto corrects. Yet "funner" is used very often in spoken English with people I meet. Is funner a word? If not why? What causes it to not be ...
4
votes
2answers
145 views

“Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?

Is the word prolers an English word or just rubbish/noise added to the Scrabble dictionary? If it's a real English word, what does it mean? (Not a general reference question by virtue of this word ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “disclude” a word and what authority says a word is a word or isn't?

So far this is what I found from Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster except the latter doesn't have disclude. Exclude — To keep something out. From Latin excludere, from ex-, “out”, + variant form of the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is “hayway” an English word?

I thought I had heard and seen this word being used. For example, If you do this, things will go hayway. Meaning that things will go out of order in a mess/berserk, something like that. Now I ...
5
votes
1answer
353 views

Is “teh” an English word?

I remember being told that "teh" (a common misspelling of "the") is actually a proper (though very old and no longer in common usage) English word. Teh was used as an example that if every single ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Is 'metacogniscent' a word?

I was watching this video and around the 1:05 minute mark the girl said 'metacogniscent', but I'm wondering whether or not that actually is a word, and if so; did she use it correctly (from what I've ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself hating people for using it both in English ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “outstaffing” a real word?

In Russia a lot of companies provide "outstaffing" services , but I am not sure whether it's used outside post USSR countries. Is "outstaffing" a real word? Update: "Outstaffing" is when one company ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why isn’t “hermeticity” easily found in the dictionaries?

The word hermeticity as (for the lack of better definition, hence the question) “the quality of being hermetic” (not to be confused with mathematical hermiticity, which is also absent from the general ...
4
votes
3answers
328 views

Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?

I find Maureen Dowd’s article in November 24 NY-Times titled “But can they eat 50 eggs?”amusing. She compares the leadership and charm of character between President Obama and Robert Griffin III, the ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there the word, “Fortunity”? If there is, what does it mean?

I "think" I clearly heard the word, “Fortunity” in the following statement of the Wall Street Journal Report of this week (November 5th), introducing the unique service of Sanchez Delta Airline via ...
1
vote
2answers
577 views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
10
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “adorkable” mean? How popular is this word? To what kind of objects and occasions can I apply “adorkable”?

I happened to find the paperback book titled Adorkable, by Sarra Manning, on the GoodReads site. There is no entry for adorkable in the Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster dictionaries, or in ...
11
votes
4answers
906 views

What does “randomically” mean?

I've just read an O’Reilly book and encoutered the word randomically. I highly suspect this is a made up word, but a quick google found it in use here, here, and here. Is this some obscure technical ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “tri-quarterly” a real English word meaning 3 times a year?

Is "tri-quarterly" a real English word meaning 3 times a year? Are there any other words that mean 3 times a year?
4
votes
1answer
326 views

Does “bloodripe” actually exist as a word?

I’ve come on the adjective bloodripe in Nabokov’s Lolita (bold emphasis added): . . . it had become quite a habit with me of not being too attentive to women lest they come toppling, bloodripe, ...
6
votes
4answers
677 views

Is “Thisness” an established English word? What is the alternative expression that sounds more natural and familiar?

I came across an unfamiliar word to me, thisness in the following sentence of New Yorker magazine’s (April 19) article titled, What We’re Reading: Buzzfeed, “Pulphead,” Chekhov, and More” James ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “payless” synonym of “free”?

Does "payless" mean "for zero price", and "free" (as in beer)? I searched the dictionaries but could not find the word. I also wonder whether "cost-free" means the same.
-3
votes
1answer
147 views

Meaning of sentence with “vercingetorism” [closed]

This remark was made on an online forum. Preliminary online search was of not much help. (D)id you intend to deal with all this vercingetorism? This is certainly not a word from one of ...
1
vote
2answers
818 views

Is the word “encomprise” used in modern English? [closed]

If one googles the word encomprises, there are 5K+ pages, that have this word. I personally have heard people in the USA use it with a meaning of include. Official dictionaries, on the other hand, ...
5
votes
2answers
452 views

Is ‘Bash-a-thon’ a received English phrase or just a combination of words?

I saw the word ‘Bash-a-thon’ in the headline of the Time magazine article (August 3) - ‘Palin Joins in Romney Bash-a-thon’ followed by the lead coy: “In an interview with Hannity, Palin takes Romney ...
23
votes
9answers
70k views

Is “receival” a valid word for the act of receiving something?

In the course of reviewing a standard operating procedure, I came across the subheading: "Receival, Costing and Charging of Work". I immediately began to doubt whether the word "receival" was a ...
7
votes
5answers
6k views

What does ‘shpritz’ mean?

I came across the word shpritz in the following sentence of a New York Times article (May 12th) titled, "At 100, Still a Teacher, Quite a Character": At 100 years old, Ms. Kaufman is still ...
6
votes
7answers
4k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is “injur” a word? [closed]

Am I going crazy? I think "injur" must be a transitive verb meaning "to cause injury to," as in "the flying debris might injur the bystanders." Yet when I google around and check online ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is “delegable” a word?

Wiktionary defines delegetable as capable of being delegated, which seems correct to the French speaking that I am. However, the same Wiktionary also defines delegable as that can be delegated. Does ...
16
votes
5answers
15k views

Is “curiouser” in fact a word (like in the famous phrase “curiouser and curiouser”)?

Is curiouser, in fact, a word?                                 (Yes, this question is very short, but that’s really all I need to ask.)
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is ‘Yes-ish’ a perfect alternative to Yes, or is it 'Yes ‘on condition’? Is it received English?

I found a word ‘Yes-ish’ in the answer (from PLL) to my question about the meaning of ‘Stuck to the script’ I posted today. As it is quite new to my ear, I consulted with Wikipedia before logging out ...
11
votes
2answers
610 views

“Oojakapiv”: what does this word mean?

A lot of people in my family use this word, not regularly, but enough for me to ask what it means. I know it’s not a “real word”, but how come people from different sides of my family use it? It must ...
15
votes
6answers
38k views

Is “funnest” a word?

We seem to be stuck at an impasse on this issue. Is funnest a word or not? If so, does it mean "most fun"?