72
votes
2answers
6k views

Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
2
votes
4answers
94 views

is “merablum” or “merablem” a word?

is there a word "merablum"? maybe "merablem"? It means scrap or remnant of food left on a plate. I always thought it was a word but I googled it and - nothing. Is Google unaware of it or is it a made ...
0
votes
1answer
237 views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
1
vote
1answer
975 views

Is “hayway” an English word?

I thought I had heard and seen this word being used. For example, If you do this, things will go hayway. Meaning that things will go out of order in a mess/berserk, something like that. Now I ...
1
vote
2answers
778 views

Is “revelationary” a word in the English language? [closed]

Is "revelationary" a word in the English language?. If it isn't a word in proper English, then which word, if any, can be used for something that leads to a revelation?
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Does the word “simpleness” actually exist? [closed]

I always thought the word "simpleness" didn't exist and this was even confirmed by some American friends of mine. However, I tried to look it up on some online dictionaries and I was surprised to find ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself hating people for using it both in English ...
-1
votes
1answer
140 views

Is 'promptus' a valid word? [closed]

I did a Google:define on Promptus and think it has Latin origin. But since I don't see it in the English dictionaries, I am not sure if I can use it at all in my conversation.
4
votes
1answer
296 views

Does “bloodripe” actually exist as a word?

I’ve come on the adjective bloodripe in Nabokov’s Lolita (bold emphasis added): . . . it had become quite a habit with me of not being too attentive to women lest they come toppling, bloodripe, ...
3
votes
1answer
202 views

Is “what in hejudas?” a common idiom or phrase?

I noticed the following phrase used in another question: Is this a common idiom? If so, what in hejudas inspired such a phrasing? Obviously, this is similar to the phrases “what in hell” or ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

When does a word become a 'word'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word The rule of thumb used to be that when a word hit the Oxford Dictionary, it was considered to be an accepted word - this, however, seems to have ...