Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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0
votes
1answer
59 views

Why doesn’t autocorrect software like “unauthorises”?

I was writing some documentation and trying to write a sentence that ran like this: It then unauthorises the transaction. I soon realised this wasn't a word, and it kept correcting this to ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Is “extrapolability” an existing english word?

I used extrapolability in a Microsoft Word 2010 document and spell checker didn't recognized it. Being a non-native English speaker I wasn’t sure whether it's a real word. Searching for it in Google ...
4
votes
6answers
1k views

Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?

I am working on a project where I need to be able to distinguish between one who is offering something for rent, and one who is renting from someone. The phrases used need to be short and concise. ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word?

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in ...
0
votes
1answer
177 views

Is “preciser” a valid comparative of “precise”?

I encountered preciser as a comparative of precise and thought it was incorrect. However, some reputable online dictionaries (1, 2) return hits for "preciser". But they do not explicitly list the ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
1
vote
1answer
209 views

Pneumonic or Mnemonic? [closed]

So my English teacher gave us some work and we had to write down 'pneumonics' for some words. I'm fairly sure it's spelt 'mnemonic.' Who's correct? Edit: The usage being the "memory" words, for ...
4
votes
3answers
306 views

bemustached versus mustached

I’ve just read an article in The Huffington Post in which the phrase “bemustached 26-year-old” was used: Sex and sword swallowing beg some pretty obvious comparisons, but the similarities aren’t ...
4
votes
2answers
243 views

Is “fillet” a different word in “salmon fillet” than in “leather fillet”

In the question "Is there a name for words which are pronounced differently depending on which definition is being used?" it was suggested by two people that when the word "fillet" is used to describe ...
3
votes
2answers
286 views

Physical object, carried be a person, that represents an encumbrance

I believe a word currently exists that is used as a metaphor to mean something similar to, "a person is (willingly?) carrying a physical object, but there is no benefit to carrying (or transporting) ...
2
votes
2answers
196 views

Could `impliant` be a proper word, meaning opposite of `pliant`?

We have the word impliable meaning the opposite of pliable, but there is no dictionary opposite of pliant. (Shorter OED, Apple Dictionary on Mac, dictionary.reference.com, ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Is “preference” a recently verbed noun?

Apple TextEdit is giving a red line underneath "preferenced", as if it's not a valid word. Wiktionary describes "preference" as being a verb as well as a noun. Is it a recently verbed noun that's ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

One-letter words in English language

The original question that came to my mind was "How many one-letter words are there in English language?". But of course, I did some research and found out there are three: A – an indefinite ...
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is there such a word as staticness?

I want to use the word staticness but can't find it on a dictionary. I've seen it though been used in my google search.
4
votes
1answer
73 views

Can the word mnemonic be used adverbally?

A mnemonic is a memory device for reducing something diverse and complicated to an easily -remembered pattern. For example, for the order of planets in the solar system, I learned as a boy the ...
16
votes
6answers
3k views

Antonym for “discombobulate”

I'm looking for a good antonym to discombobulate. I'm aware that the word is made-up American slang and as such there is no such thing as to be combobulated. If a person is anything but ...
5
votes
5answers
570 views

Can one ever say for certain a word does not exist? [closed]

Can it ever be concluded that an alleged word is not actually a word? Obviously, if a word is not in a particular dictionary, it does not mean the word is any less of a word than the ones that do ...
1
vote
5answers
946 views

Does the word 'incrementation' exist?

An example: "To increment a variable makes an incrementation". One language wiki says it does, while MS Word and several dictionaries say there is no such word.
5
votes
2answers
389 views

Why “pastime” but not “passtime”?

pastime n. An activity that occupies one's spare time pleasantly: Sailing is her favorite pastime. [TFD] Etymonline says that it is from pass + time: late 15c., passe tyme "recreation, ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is “ailer” not a word?

I was playing Scrabble recently and the word ail was on the table. I tried to add an -er to the word to make the word "ailer." My reasoning was that since ail is a verb, one could add a suffix to the ...
-2
votes
1answer
246 views

What is the pronunciation of “ttiwdty”?

ttiwdty Not an initialism AFAIK (as far as I know) but an acronym like LASER and NATO. It's apparently trending on Urban Dictionary, although the down-votes outnumber the up-votes. It stands for The ...
2
votes
3answers
12k views

Is “tnetennba” a real word?

I've seen and heard the word "tnetennba" used, most famously by Moss in an episode of the It Crowd in which he was a contestant on a fake episode of the TV show Countdown. In this episode, no ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “attentioned” a word?

I am often getting things sent to myself and other people. Is it wrong to say: Please send to... [address] attentioned to [name] I often say: Please sent to... [address] and attention it to ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

Is “attemptee” actually a word?

I've seen the word online: American woman jumps into West Lake to save suicide attemptee... But then I tried the dictionary and didn't get any results. Is attemptee actually a word?
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Does the word “dashily” exist in English?

Could someone, please say if the word "dashily" exists? I couldn't find one in any vocabularies. A few hours ago I saw this web clip (The Vampire Diaries), and beginning from 00:40 Damon says: ...
3
votes
4answers
599 views

Is there a generic word for “all of x type of thing”?

I am looking for a generic collective noun that can be acceptably used to refer to all existing things of some particular kind. It would apply to "all existing trees", "all existing vehicles", "all ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Term for organization being sponsored — “sponsee”? [duplicate]

I have seen a few sponsorship agreements and in one of them the term "sponsee" was used to define the organization being sponsored. The context was a company who sponsors a local team. The agreement ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is 'efficate' a word in English? [closed]

I routinely hear the word "efficate" being used. For example, "The most powerful way to efficate a change in the system is to participate." I do not find entries for this word in common English ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

On the Existence of the Word 'Grousily'

Is 'grousily' a word? I would like to use it in a sentence to mean 'grumpily, as if in imitation of a rumpled grouse' but don't think it's okay because of how I couldn't find it in either OS X's ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
1
vote
2answers
628 views

Is “fresher” really a “proper” English word?

I see a lot of folks on Stackoverflow using fresher when describing themselves as beginners at any given topic. I have never really heard of "fresher" as a synonym for beginner. I know "freshman" as ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Is it “re-offend” or “reoffend”? [closed]

I want to know whether there is a hyphen in the word re-offend, or if it is spelt reoffend. I looked in Oxford English dictionary and the word "reoffend" appears, but then I checked Merriam-Webster ...
5
votes
2answers
166 views

Why isn't “innard” a word?

Innards is defined as "the internal organs of an animal". Then shouldn't "innard" denote a single internal organ? Or is this a case where a singular noun looks like a plural?
1
vote
1answer
905 views

Adding a suffix and a prefix to the word “ocean” [closed]

Is it possible to add a prefix to the word ocean? Also, is it possible to add a suffix to it as well?
9
votes
4answers
1k views

Is versionize a real word?

Is the word "versionize" a real word or is it a form of bastardization of English? Additional Info: I came across this word in a software feature tracker. The feature called for something in the ...
-2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the meaning of unhighlight [closed]

What does the word "unhighlight" mean? Alternately, is it even a word? What would be its usage? I can't find it in my dictionary or on the internet. I am using it in the context of if you highlight ...
0
votes
2answers
325 views

Are you familiar with the term “air-conditioningitis”? [closed]

According to this article, "[a]ir-conditioningitis occurs when the body cannot adjust properly to the sharp differences in temperature between the cool air-conditioned indoors and the warm outdoors." ...
2
votes
3answers
129 views

Is “recordee” a word? [closed]

Does recordee exist in English? The word doesn't exist in Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries, but I was hoping to use it as "someone who is being recorded".
1
vote
3answers
6k views

What’s the opposite of “wider”? [closed]

What is the opposite of wide and wider? For instance, is the corresponding opposite to sentence one below really sentence two? The Ipad2 is wider than the iPad Air. The iPad Air is narrower than ...
-1
votes
1answer
116 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [closed]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
3
votes
1answer
269 views

Is “banana” the shortest overlap word?

Banana, alfalfa, entente: these are words containing an overlap, that is, the pattern XYXYX where X and Y are replaced by letters or sequences of letters. The idea is that the two occurrences of XYX ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “irritance” not a word?

I thought the word irritance was a word — but it isn’t one according to Google and my dictionary. It sounds correct; what is the word I should use? By irritance I mean something that’s being ...
77
votes
3answers
7k views

Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
2
votes
4answers
150 views

Is “blog-avatar” a proper word?

I’m envisaging something just like your avatar or profile picture but for a blog entry. Each blog entry has a single picture which will be displayed as a small thumbnail for each item on the list. I ...
2
votes
4answers
114 views

is “merablum” or “merablem” a word?

is there a word "merablum"? maybe "merablem"? It means scrap or remnant of food left on a plate. I always thought it was a word but I googled it and - nothing. Is Google unaware of it or is it a made ...
2
votes
1answer
712 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
3
votes
1answer
462 views

Name of a word where you can continually remove one letter from the beginning or end

This is possibly off-topic here - please redirect me if necessary I am looking for the name of a type of word where you can continually remove one letter from the start or end of the word, until ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

“handy” instead of “mobile phone” (non-Germans) [duplicate]

Does anybody (non-German) ever use the word handy instead of mobile-phone in English?
0
votes
3answers
6k views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?