Tagged Questions

Questions about English spoken in Ireland and by Irish people.

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2
votes
1answer
66 views

“Is himself in?” What does it mean?

Context - A stranger knocks on your door and asks "Is himself in?" himself, a reflexive pronoun, here seems to be used for a nominative pronoun.
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Does the English prefix hiberno- mean that the Irish were associated with winter? [closed]

In Medieval Latin, hibernus meant Irish: https://www.google.com/search?q=hiberno+etymology In Latin, hibernus meant wintry: https://www.google.com/search?q=hibernate+etymology Therefore, can I say ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Telling the time [closed]

In Ireland we say: "Twenty-five to ten" (9:35) (21:35) "Twenty to ten" (9:40) (21:40) "A quarter to ten" (9:45) (21:45) "Ten to ten" (9:50) (21:50) "Five to ten" (9:55) (21:55) "Ten o'clock" or just ...
3
votes
3answers
267 views

What is the origin of the phrase “do a line with someone”?

What is the origin of the phrase "do a line with someone", meaning "have a regular romantic or sexual romantic relationship with someone"? I learnt this phrase from an Irish colleague of mine the ...
5
votes
4answers
853 views

Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?

It's a common stereotype of Irish-English speakers that they end sentences with "at all, at all" as in You want a drink at all, at all? You have any money at all, at all? My question is ...
1
vote
2answers
102 views

Irish English use of “college” for secondary schools?

I've been filtering locations in Ireland from a list that comes with Google Maps location data for each, selecting those that are close to a "college". I just checked on one of those locations ...
1
vote
1answer
144 views

Adjective relating to Great Britain and Ireland

Is there an adjective meaning “from or pertaining to the British Isles” (or if you prefer “from Great Britain, Ireland or surrounding islands”, or “from the Atlantic Archipelago”, or whatever floats ...
0
votes
4answers
278 views

Why do people say “Why don’t you not?”

Why do people say “Why don’t you not?” — what is meant by that? It seems especially to be a Dublin thing.
4
votes
1answer
717 views

Is “mens” a valid word?

I've been living in Ireland for almost a year now and I start noticing they use the word "mens" a lot. I can see it used in: Shops, to denote the area where you can find men's clothes In sport, when ...
15
votes
5answers
2k views

Is there a name for how the Irish use so, so?

There is an Irish English structural usage of the word so, that is I think unique to Ireland. Are we going to the cinema, so? Where is the dog, so? The word so is unneeded and seems to mean ...
5
votes
3answers
237 views

Is “ O’Leary’s’s ” orthographically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Possessive of a word that's already possessive? There’s a bar near me named O’Leary’s Irish Pub—or just O’Leary’s for short. One day, they changed their menu. I ...
6
votes
10answers
963 views

Does Santy (Santa) exist outside Ireland?

It's common at this time of year for adults to ask small children What's Santy bringing you? (awkward as this is for those of us who don't celebrate Christmas). Is this pronunciation of Santa unique ...
6
votes
1answer
791 views

Origin and meaning of “strealish”/“streelish”

I've heard the word strealish (or streelish) used to describe someone with a lost or wan look or someone unkempt or untidy. I know it's an Irishism, but what is the origin of the word and what did it ...
-2
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the correct British / Irish English spelling of Yoghurt? [closed]

Is it youghurt, yoghurt, or yogurt? Is there a correct spelling, or are they all correct?
5
votes
7answers
2k views

What is “lemonade” in American English?

Lemonade is a fizzy drink, strongly carbonated. It comes in two varieties, white (which is actually colourless) and red. I have never known anyone to make it at home. Various things I've picked up in ...
11
votes
8answers
8k views

Does British English use the term “heel” for the end slice of bread?

I'm Irish, and hence speak Hiberno-English. Here is a photograph of some sliced bread: The topmost slice of this (that's crust on the end), is called "the heel". Is this meaning for "heel" ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Sleep in” versus “Sleep out”

Over the years, I have often debated whether the phrase is "In the morning, I'm going to sleep in." or "In the morning, I'm going to sleep out." My best guess is that it is a regional difference of ...
8
votes
4answers
7k views

Footwear: Runners. Sneakers. Trainers

There's a type of shoe which I, being Irish, would call runners. They're comfortable for running or walking in. The British call them trainers, probably because they can be used for sports or ...
11
votes
5answers
21k views

How does one correctly pronounce the letter 'H': “Aych” or “haych”?

What is the correct sound of the letter H when reading the alphabet - is it 'aych' or 'Haych' ?
4
votes
4answers
908 views

Usage of “might” and “would” to indicate doubt

Do the sentences She might be only 28, but Jodie Whittaker.... and My parents would have walked along the Barrow wrongly suggest doubt, or are they normal usage? Are there names for ...